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Discussion Starter #1
I watched as they worked, two big guys manhandled the tire on by pushing it down on the rim while the rim was being supported by the spokes on a tire mounting stand. I now have a "high speed wobble" at 85 MPH. The bike did not have this problem previously. I normally put my own tires on but the bike is still under warranty.

The spokes appear to be fine. Is it the tire?
 

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Was the tire balanced?? You didn't say. I've mounted lots of 761's and never had an issue. I don't however, have a need to drive at 85 MPH. I think the KLR would wobble at that speed no matter the tire.
 

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Was the tire balanced?? You didn't say. I've mounted lots of 761's and never had an issue. I don't however, have a need to drive at 85 MPH. I think the KLR would wobble at that speed no matter the tire.
Probably a balance issue. I found out NOT to ride at higher speed as I get a nasty wobble. Front is just too lite for those speeds unless all else is darn near perfect.
 

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What's the pressure?

Was the wheel static balanced or dynamic balanced?

How is your head bearing?

Is your preload high enough or rear spring strong enough?

Did you have the rear wheel out at the same time? Is the rear wheel aligned?

New front only? Seems like high-speed wobble affects KLRs with low rear and high front. Sometimes that's luggage on the back only, sometimes that's not enough preload. It could be that the new tire is tall enough to make handling marginal.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
They did not balance the tire, the rear tire was replaced a month or so prior, it is also a K761. 40 psi pressure on the front. Bike has 4500 miles on it. No load on the back, and the rear shock is at it's stiffest, as I normally ride 2 up, just not fast. I guess I should not be going 85 anyway, eh?

Thanks for the replies.
 

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Does the tire look evenly seated around the rim?
Do the rim and tire each run straight and true if spun when elevated?
I look at the Left / Right / Left / Right staggering of the center tread blocks on the K761 (Front and Rear tires) and wonder if it might could create a wobble? Compare to an Avon Gripster pattern maybe.

Might check for proper steering bearing adjustment.
Might read this old posting,
http://www.klrforum.com/54914-post25.html
from this thread,
http://www.klrforum.com/1987-2007-wrenching-mods/1739-klunking-noise-front-end.html
 

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I really like K761s; they are my preferred tire because they are inexpensive, long lasting, and work pretty well. Like the KLR, they are excellent at nothing (except wear) but pretty good at everything.

That said, I have some views that some think are controversial. Take the following with a grain of salt. Or, if you know me, go steal a salt lick from the pasture...

I mount the K761 'backwards' on the front. That is, the rotational arrow points the wrong way. I found that, regardless of pressure, that tire will cup badly if mounted according to the arrow. It will also hunt and wander something fierce on rain grooves and will follow any line in the road like Mary's little lamb. It also won't turn in worth a damn. Granted, this is my experience only and could well be a result of how I ride and how I load the bike. In fact, it probably is.

Mounted the wrong way it will work wonderfully. I find them to be good for well over 15k miles and they'll still have life left in them but they get changed out from a sense of guilt over being so damn cheap. (sorry Mark, nothing personal)

My lawyer tells me that I need to advise you not do do as I do but to merely read the above as an interesting anecdote, for following my advice you will surely die in a crumpled ball of twisted steel and mangled rubber (though I note that I have never been killed, not even once).

I also believe that any front tire should be balanced. It should be mounted with attention paid to any weight dot it might have and then checked for balance.

Paul's advice of setting the front tire up with 2psi more pressure than the rear is also good and helps with most any issue you might see in the tire.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I did notice that once they man handled the tire on the rim, they lubed up the tire very well and then slid it around on the rim, Probably to align said marks. I went out today to work in the "shop" had to move the bike, and it has a front flat now. Maybe 100 miles on the front tire. There is also all kinds of slime coming out of the thing. Do these bikes come with stop leak in the tires already? Oh well, I should have put the tire on myself. This happens almost every time I get lazy and pay someone to do a simple job.
I just like for factory folks to work on stuff under warranty still.

The tire may have been going low on me and causing the wobble for all I know.
Thanks for all of the help, I too like the K761's.
 

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I went out today to work in the "shop" had to move the bike, and it has a front flat now. Maybe 100 miles on the front tire. There is also all kinds of slime coming out of the thing. Do these bikes come with stop leak in the tires already?
They pinched the tube. The "slime" is likely the tire lube that's inside the rim and carried out by leaking air. Take it back and have them try again.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Not likely, it's 40 miles from home(each way). I'll bite the bullet this time and learn, again.
I am pretty confident that they did pinch the tube though. I'll know when I get it apart.
Besides, they don't like me anyway, as I provide my own tires. They charged $35.00 for the rear tire installation, and $30.00 for the front, which I thought was kind of high.
 

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It is strange that you are surprised by the non stock Slime in the tube.

I would get the tire up and spin it around to look for a nail, screw ... . I don't mind using Slime to get out of the woods, but I wouldn't want to start off with a new tire and a Slime repaired tube.

Did you get the bike new? Have you had other flat repair, new tube or new tire work done by others who may have used slime?

On the occasions when I have had a new tire installed while on the road the dealer would not install the tire without a new tube even though it was not a flat repair. Just a tire replacement. I don't know if that is a legal requirement, an insurance requirement or just a way to increase sales.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Bought the bike new, this is the first replacement tire. I am not surprised by the slime, just curious if it is standard equipment. It should be, If it is not. Yes, I'll pick up a new tube before I pull it apart. I'll definitely look for the culprit, and I usually find them the hard way, with a poked finger. I truly suspect the installation was done poorly though.
 

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Gadzooks, your lucky that thing didn't blow out when you were doing 85!
I'd chalk it up to a pinched tube as well, possibly when they were repositioning the tire with the tube in already. Guessing the low tire was causing your wobble as well.
 

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Rather than using your hand to "look" for a nail, use a wadded up women's nylon. it will catch on any sharp protrusion saving the wear and tear on your fingers! Get your heads out of the gutter you guys!!

This one wasn't too hard to find! Notice the head of the screw near the center of the tread and the point exiting the sidewall!


The inside view! That is a 3" deck screw I found on my way home from work one evening. The tube was trashed.

JJ
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Been there done that, I had one similar to that when I was coming home from work, and I was toting a 50# bag of dog food. That was fun! I pushed about 2 miles before a friend came by.

That was on a previous bike, a 2000 WR400Fm
 

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Tires

From the way they were doing the change, i'd probably not let then touch my bike again.

I had 2 consecutive flats on my KLR. It turned out to be a piece of small wire, like from a steel wire brush. It got missed on first change.

As for balance, I like my tires to be well balanced. That's why I do my own now.
I also had 2 different Kenda K-270 tires ( for the front ) that made my front end bounce up-&-down. Returned them both, and put a Midas on front. No more bounce. ( My son also had a K-270 bounce on his Honda 650. I won't put Kenda K-270's on my bike any more.
I like a nice smooth ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I'd sure like a tip on "home balancing" a tire. Those guys are done with my bike, for sure, especially if the tube is damaged from them. I was taught, and I still will air up the tire and totally deflate it to allow for the tube to find it's home, so to speak. These guys did not do that either.

Thanks for the tips. Another trick I have used, is I keep track of the position of the tube in the tire, so that when I find the leak, I can go straight to the same area on the tire and concentrate my search there.
 

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Home balancing is really easy.
Remove the wheel from the bike. Insert the axel through the wheel and rest it across two jackstands. GENTLY/SLOWLY spin the wheel. The heavy side will sink to the bottom and stop.Temporarily affix whatever weight you are going to use(stick on or spoke weights) to the top side on the rim or spoke and spin the wheel again.
If the wheel stops with the weight to the top you need MORE weight. If the wheel stops with the weight to the bottom you need LESS weight.
With the correct amount of weight in the correct position the wheel will stop in a relatively random fashion. The weight may end up at 10o'clock one time then 5o'clock then somewhere else next time.
You don't need to spin the wheel very fast, slow is better.
This is a type of static balance. I find it good up to about 100mph. If you ride faster you may need the tires balanced on a dynamic balancing machine that spins the assembly at high speed.
I did an experiment. Before balancing the rear one time, I put the bike up on blocks securely and started the engine. I ran it in top gear at 4500rpm or about 60mph. The rear wheel was hopPpPing up and down over an inch. After balancing the wheel it was dead smooth. You feel all that out of balance as vibration through the frame and bars. That is why I always balance my tires and wheels.
JJ
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I had to read through the explanation twice, but I get it. Rest it on the stands as it sits on the bike. I was trying to understand it in the sense of the old car bubble balancers.
I'll get some weights and try it. Thank you.
 

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Yes you have it.
It took me much longer to write it than to do it! Experiment a bit at first spinning the tire and watching what it does as it comes to a stop. Sometimes it will stop then go the other direction. This is just the heavy part sinking to the bottom.
JJ
 
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