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Discussion Starter #1
SOOOO, new rear tire time. Pinched tube taking it off, pinched new tube putting on.
Dropped off to nice place to have it done. I will check psi before leaving to make sure they didn't pinch after patching.
( really!!! really) want to go tubless. Front and back. What do I need?? Please?
 

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Common question and desire.....particularly amongst the "tire changing challenged"! LOL

Honestly, I like tubes; if you've ever had to try to reseat a tube-less tire in the bush, you gain an appreciation for them. They are also a bit more flat resistant - particularly with a decent HD tube. I'd point out that all offroad bikes have tubes. Honestly, it's a matter of practice and technique more than anything, I haven't pinched a tube in 20+ years.

There are several ways to turn your spoked, tube type rims to tubeless but make sure whatever you use isn't just sealing the spoke nipples up as they have to remain adjustable. The high end adventure bikes with spoked rims and tubeless tires have special rims where the spokes don't penetrate the interior of the rim - I'm sure you could retrofit those but it'd be big $$$$

Another option is the Tubliss system which uses a high pressure inner tube in the bead area which seats the tire, acts as a rimlock and seals the rest of the "air bladder". It works great, but they don't make them in a 17".....which is why I have two 18" Excel wheels on my shelf awaiting me getting the energy to do the swap.

2 cents,
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So no one makes a tubless rim that would fit the klr? I dont offroad much.
Sealing the spoked rim is easy. As I have camper roof repair stuff called eternal bond ( I beleave) and once stuck, its stuck. I have every thing to do pull and plug tire repair and like that best
What options is there for the home dude and no tire irons.
Like mounting tire taking an hour with 3 mechanical bead breakers?? That might press tire on rim?
 

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So no one makes a tubless rim that would fit the klr? I dont offroad much.
Sealing the spoked rim is easy. As I have camper roof repair stuff called eternal bond ( I beleave) and once stuck, its stuck. I have every thing to do pull and plug tire repair and like that best
What options is there for the home dude and no tire irons.
Like mounting tire taking an hour with 3 mechanical bead breakers?? That might press tire on rim?
1) I'm sure they do; plan on spending $1,000 unless you can re-lace hubs yourself.

2) again, sealing may be easy but now try adjusting your spokes.....what does that do to your seal?

3) A good friend of mine who is a mechanic says this: tire changing is 5% effort, 10% tools and 85% technique. Having had to maintain 3 racebikes at a time for several decades has provided me with more practice in this regard than I would like. Changing a tire takes me about 20 minutes, I use two large spoons and a can of WD40.....I have bead breakers and the Motion Pro Bead Buddies but, honestly, I seldom use them.

This may be of interest to you, I tried it but it didn't save me much time and effort.....but then I don't have problems with the traditional way;

Dave
 

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I wont call myself good at changing tires, but here are some musings. 1) good tire irons if they are not the long handle spoon type then find at least on (2?) cheater bars to turn the iron into a long lever (2 foot?) If you do not turn what I will call the "middle iron" into a long lever then you better bench press 325lbs.

Use a lot of lube WD40 is popular - I use 303 protectant as is too is slippery and 100% UV so the sun will not weather your tube once inside the casing of the tire.

Inspect and squeeze to ensure tube is not stuck in the trough of the unseated bead. Pull valve core. Use compressed air if possible. begin to air up until movement is detected to and release the air. then air up until a bit more movement is detected- then stop and release. the idea is to allow the lubed up (and UV protected) tube to slide home into its pocket clear of the beads pinching. then after a few of these pre inflations, air up to set the bead - she will eventually pop home - hopefully clear of tube. I would again release one last time after bead is set. reinstall value core. inflate 34psi. Ride fearlessly knowing your tube is not pinched and is 100% UV protected
 

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It always looks so easy on the internet, doesn't it? They must get lots of practice doing it every time someone clicks the button...

I feel your pain and I don't like changing the rear tire if I can avoid it; the advice/guidance I got from an experienced off-roader was to use a lot of lube and baby powder, inflate a few pounds before mounting, and to take really small "bites" with the irons. The best thing about it is when it's finally done (and holds air).
 

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That last vid, the Quick Change one... Not to belittle that dude's skills, I'm sure he has changed hundreds more tires than I have... but that is a front wheel. Those are traditionally easier than the rears. See the other dude at the end of the video? He is still trying to fight the tire off that rear wheel. (jk, that was pretty impressive).

Kidding aside, I want to point out something that I saw him doing that I suspect gets many folks in trouble with pinches. Notice that each time he takes a bite w the spoons, just as he passes the vertical point, he leans/pivots the tire iron over to the side. That will help you to not pinch the tube.

And, on a personal note. I want to believe Kawasaki when they say the KLR has a 17 inch rear wheel, but I think they've rounded down and that sucker is like 17.25" that last bite is a mother!!!!! I won't buy the Dunlop 606 anymore because they're just too hard on me to get them over the rim. I really like the way they look and work, but don't want to deal w breaking or setting that bead on the side of the road.

sre
 

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That last vid, the Quick Change one... Not to belittle that dude's skills, I'm sure he has changed hundreds more tires than I have... but that is a front wheel. Those are traditionally easier than the rears. See the other dude at the end of the video? He is still trying to fight the tire off that rear wheel. (jk, that was pretty impressive).

Kidding aside, I want to point out something that I saw him doing that I suspect gets many folks in trouble with pinches. Notice that each time he takes a bite w the spoons, just as he passes the vertical point, he leans/pivots the tire iron over to the side. That will help you to not pinch the tube.

And, on a personal note. I want to believe Kawasaki when they say the KLR has a 17 inch rear wheel, but I think they've rounded down and that sucker is like 17.25" that last bite is a mother!!!!! I won't buy the Dunlop 606 anymore because they're just too hard on me to get them over the rim. I really like the way they look and work, but don't want to deal w breaking or setting that bead on the side of the road.

sre

Yes rears are harder.....but D606's are my tire of choice for my two KLR's and I change them a couple times a season - no problem. Maybe try that zip tie method, it does take some of the effort out.

Dave
 

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I use baby powder on the tube, and windex as lube when i mount the tire.

Slightly put air in the tube so you avoid pinching it with your tire iron.

I use two big C-CLAMP to compress the tire, the bead must slip inside the rim when you work on the other side. If not you will never be able to mount your tire.

If the bead slip correctly inside the rim you don't have to use much force.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ill have to try the zip tie thing again, as I did it last year and still pinched the tube. The front is very easy, on and off.
What is the softer type rear tires, as they should wear quicker, but go on easier.
Tire wasn't done today by 4pm, so ill go back tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Just came across this thing called a Baja no pinch tire tool, about $165, looks simple to use. It may save my little sanity.
Not sure how to post it, it has a guy doing a vid and looks very portable. ON only, tire irons to still take off.
 

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Just came across this thing called a Baja no pinch tire tool, about $165, looks simple to use. It may save my little sanity.
Not sure how to post it, it has a guy doing a vid and looks very portable. ON only, tire irons to still take off.
I used one last year (buddy bought one)......I can see how some like it but I found it cumbersome and I could see damaging it if you aren't careful since it's made light enough to pack.

Dave
 

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of course the really good guys can do it in FAR less time:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7jOKy8AzLc
Even tho he can out ride either of us, I'll tell anyone that will listen, that without supporting the rim up off of the ground, one should NEVER change a tire on flat ground with the DISC on the ground! TOO Easy to tweak a disc even .020 inch and create hydraulic brake issues.

If having to work on the ground, work with the disc brake UP, to prevent bending of the disc.
In the shop, I dis-mount / re-mount M/C tires working on top of an old used 14" spare wheel & tire from a boat trailer. Then the disc can go DOWN inside the wheel and Away from my knuckles.

On real dirt bikes with bolted sprockets, the sprocket goes down inside the trailer wheel. Disc brake is kinder to knuckles than sprocket teeth. ;)

And working on top of a 6 to 10 inch elevated wheel is kinder to ones knees & ankles. I use my knees to keep the side bead compressed into the wheel spoke drop center, to allow the bead to be more easily spooned onto the rim. (Working from my knees which are opposite from the valve stem, towards the valve stem, on alternating sides. 2 inch increments.)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I will travel to a KLR seminar, when the world opens back up some day. (to learn)
Im still going to get the other tire iron free thingy to see if that's for me. For next time.
Got tire around 10am this morning, and reinstalled.
Got tire mounted and balanced and the other tube/both tubes I pinched fixed for $20, I gave $30 and still felt bad. (that's cheep)
Same place, got a bad valve stem replaced on my 2500 dodge for $10,, I had the valve stem and took tire off. That's cheap.
Took bike down gravel roads 90% to the North Dakota side, as im on the MN side, and MN is still closed, but ND is back to kinda normal. Can go out to eat and or gamble if one wants.
Nothing cooler/funner, than a sigh that sais minimum maintained road. Kinda makes ya take it. I do like the shinko 705, so far, just 120, most gravel, just don't like mounting it.
As always,,, thanks all for the help.
 

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Common question and desire.....it's a matter of practice and technique more than anything, I haven't pinched a tube in 20+ years...
Dave
20 years! I wish I had your skills. Sadly, I pinched a tube 2 weeks ago for the 1st time in approx 13 years (Maybe 10 tires?) AND I broke a Motion Pro Tire spoon trying to mount a rear Shinko 700 to my KLR. This was my 3rd Shinko 700 and I don't remember any previous ones being such a PITA, but at my age my brain seems to be offloading painful memories, I hope as a self-preservation mechanism... FWIW, I don't have a tire changing stand. I just do them on my knees on the garage floor kinda like I would if I ever had change it on the road or trail. (Which has never happened to to me so I should probably just buy a stand or that Baja thingy...) Hope this doesn't discourage anyone from learning to change their own tires. I think my tube probably deserved to be pinched as it was living on borrowed time. I believe my 1 spare rear tube is about 5 years old this year.
 

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20 years! I wish I had your skills.
Oh, it's easy; you just have to enter a hundred races or so; teach your wife and kids how to ride and then spend every weekend from April to October out camping and racing/riding for a few decades. Simple! LOL

I had a very similar conversation with a buddy years ago; we were riding in Baja on parts of the old race course and he was an accomplished street rider but didn't have much offroad experience. I was riding a clapped out, stock 1989 KLR650 and he was riding a brand new 2001 DRZ400. He was also a firefighter and was in excellent shape while (at the time) I was packing 10-20 extra lbs. Anyhow, we came to an old dried out creek bed full of head sized rocks and I let him go first - he was having a hell of a time and fell, cursing. .....I stood up and rode the old KLR to the top of the hill......man, was he mad! ...he was ranting and raving and saying "how did you do that, out of shape on that old POS bike?!" .......I told him the same thing; first, enter a local harescrambles or enduro race....and then keep doing that for 10+ years and you too will develop the necessary skills!


Dave
 
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