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SO, I have a bridgestone trail wing rear tire, the stock one didn't last very long at all. Front didn't last long either. BUT, the front tire is also a bridgestone trail wing, and went on like a dream.
The rear, first time, pinched the tube, a lot, put in new tube, tried letting sit in sun and still didn't go on. Took It to a tire shop, and it was fine for about 3,000, miles then noticed low rear tire. Took tube out, pinched spot where I pinched it again, the second time installed. Just put in a new tube, couldn't get the last part of tire on, again. Took it to a tire shop, and found I pinched it again. ( my fault for not checking to see if I pinched it again, before going to tire shop.) I have a new tube on the way and will just install it and not try to put tire on, but go right to tire shop for $10 to have them put it on.
What is a softer install tire, I can install next time I need a new rear? Im more 70/30 ,,70 on road.
I don't mind making mistakes, but this is the 3rd time.
 

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Are you putting a little air in the tube before you put it in the tire? Put in just enough to get it round, but not starting to expand. That way it can still be compressed when putting it in between the rim and tire. Then, just go slow and do not push in your irons to far. Make sure the tube is not under the iron before you start to move the bead on to the rim. Using tire lube also helps to get the tire bead into the rim. I use No Mar lube. I used this method and did not have any problems with pinching the tube. Then I got a No Mar changer and it made changing tires much easier.
 

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In the shop, I work on top of a automotive wheel & tire. So that the bike brake disc is protected & down away from my knuckles. This elevates the wheel and allows ones Knees to keep the first 2/3 of installed bead compressed into the spoke drop center so that the last 1/3 of bead can be (more) easily slipped over the rim.
Of course the tire iron flat tip can only be inserted about 1/4 - 1/2 inch over the rim lip. If inserted TOO Far you will still pinch the tube.
Also, only install 2 -3 inches of bead at a time.

Motion Pro tools makes the "Bead Buddy", which 2 or 3 of them could keep the bead down in the drop center also. As I get older & less flexible I may have to purchase a few. They might need a little modifying of the 'spoke hook' to engage on the KLR wheel.
 

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Proper tire installation is a matter of technique more than anything. I haven't pinched a tire for 25 years now (41 bikes so far). There are lots of youtube videos out there - some tips:
- use lube (I use WD40 but you can use a specialty lube like RuGlide or even talcum powder)
- use HD real rubber tubes
- partially inflate the tube (but not too much)
- use tire irons that don't have sharp edges
- make sure the tire opposite of your tire iron has both beads in the center of the rim.
- don't take "bites" that are too big - a little at a time.

IMO, it's best to learn to do it right so you can fix it yourself if/when the need arises.

Dave
 

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For my two cents worth, I’ve decided to try out the zip tie method when I mount my TCK-80 tires. I just haven’t decided on just trying it on my workbench or buying a stand for it. I’m not going to do it on the floor I can tell you that much.
 

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Then I got a No Mar changer and it made changing tires much easier.

When not in use, does it collapse? Or is it easy to store?

I’ve been looking at a couple and at the very least want a fairly quick disassembly method and easy storage as I’ll only change them once a year or so.
 

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For my two cents worth, I’ve decided to try out the zip tie method when I mount my TCK-80 tires. I just haven’t decided on just trying it on my workbench or buying a stand for it. I’m not going to do it on the floor I can tell you that much.
How wide is the spare wheel on your car, truck, jeep, trailer? A 15 inch rim is large enough ID for the biggest of sport bike brake discs. With a tire mounted, it protects mag wheel spokes from damage. One can even stack 2 automotive wheel assemblies if you have back issues.
 
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I use one of these that I made a stand for; welded to a 2.5" sched. 40 steel pipe and a spare car rim;



Dave
 

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....but it only makes life a bit easier now that I'm old; I've changed dozens if not hundreds of tires just kneeling on the floor/ground.:46:
 

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How wide is the spare wheel on your car, truck, jeep, trailer? A 15 inch rim is large enough ID for the biggest of sport bike brake discs. With a tire mounted, it protects mag wheel spokes from damage. One can even stack 2 automotive wheel assemblies if you have back issues.

My car doesn’t have a spare tire. Just a bottle of slime and a 12v compressor. More and more vehicles have been moving this way.
 

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I use one of these that I made a stand for; welded to a 2.5" sched. 40 steel pipe and a spare car rim;

Ive seen these and initially it’s what I was going to buy. Still might, but I’d have to find a place to put it when not in use. I’ve also heard the bead breaker can be fairly flimsy and bend on you depending on what model/vendor you buy.

So, I’ve been thinking of the No-Mar and the Rabaconda IIRC. Both are at working bright and the latter packs away into a bag when not in use.
 

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Ive seen these and initially it’s what I was going to buy. Still might, but I’d have to find a place to put it when not in use. I’ve also heard the bead breaker can be fairly flimsy and bend on you depending on what model/vendor you buy.

So, I’ve been thinking of the No-Mar and the Rabaconda IIRC. Both are at working bright and the latter packs away into a bag when not in use.
to be honest, I've only used it a couple of times. The bead breaker is OK.....but it's mostly just a nice stable platform to work on at a height that doesn't anger my old back. The Rabaconda looks pretty similar, the No-Mar looks much nicer but it's $$$. I also tried the Baja no pinch tire tool but wasn't that impressed.


Dave
 

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The first time I changed a tire, I struggled with it for hours, and I was doing it wrong. Then I watched a video by Rocky Mountain ATV/MC, and I've had very little trouble since then. I don't even have all the fancy tools; I only have two bicycle tire spoons, but I can still do it, and I've even used them to change ATV tires.

For me, it's about having a good solid place to work (Black & Decker Workmate allows the sprocket and brake rotor to avoid pressure), a warm tire, and some slickum. I just use diluted Simple Green for my slickum. The hardest part is the bead lock. Push the tire bead as deep as you can into the spoke valley, and you should have no trouble getting the tire on and off.
 

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Tire changing is 80% technique, 15% the right tools and 5% effort. At my tech days we will often do Tire Changing 101. Watching others try it becomes obvious they think its 80% effort, 15% right tools and 5% technique lol.

I'm picky about my tire irons. I like MotionPro old school short narrow tip for my working spoon and the other two spoons I don't care what type; narrow tip, large spoon, short, long etc. Next helpful tool is MotionPro bead buddy. Lube (RuGlyle from Napa or gel from NoMar) is always used in the shop. On the trail its nice to have but technique becomes more important without. You can pick up a 15" auto rim for free easily. There are several methods and you can try several and/or develop you own.

I often refer others to a 5 or 6 part short video by searching youtube - 'Bridgestone Doug Schopinsky' For one method.
 

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I often refer others to a 5 or 6 part short video by searching youtube - 'Bridgestone Doug Schopinsky' For one method.


My oldest had a hell of a time learning spoons and not pinching. Mainly from bull in a china shop mode. he had trouble learning the finesse/feel. I bought him some MP T6 spoons to try. I didn't know it until I had them in my hand but the one with the 10/12mm end for the adjusters has a tiny lip on it. You slip the spoon in and rest it the lip on the rim edge and it wont let you pinch. Using this he figured out how to do it. Its pretty foolproof provided you arent mounting a seriously stiff obnoxious sidewall tire.

Then I took the tool back for myself :laugh3: and made him buy his own

I use the No Mar lube as Chuck mentioned.

https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0588
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I do have the bead buddy, it helps a lot, and a set of 3, spoons, use dawn dishsoap to lube. Tire goes on fine until the last 10-12 inches, then its a no go. Everything for me needs to be portable. I have a manual bead breaker that works great.
I thank all for the responces. Ill have it mounted this time when the tube comes in. Then when I need a new tire, ill remove tube and try to install the tire back on to see if I can get it on, as it is junk anyway. Off road is one thing, on road I have AAA, and can be towed up to 250 miles.
their is a couple simple cheep mounting, manual, machines, that I could break down and store in the back camper storage. I like the one that has the hitch mount to give leverage. That ones $400, I could get the $130 one and make the hitch mount when I get to my friends farm this spring.
comparing the stock soft tire to the bridgestone, is like a sponge to a rock.
 

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When not in use, does it collapse? Or is it easy to store?

I’ve been looking at a couple and at the very least want a fairly quick disassembly method and easy storage as I’ll only change them once a year or so.
It does not break down at all. I got the receiver hitch mount so it slides into the hitch on my pickup. When I am done with it, I move it into the corner of the garage. It takes up a little space there, but better than being mounted to the floor and in the way.
 

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I do have the bead buddy, it helps a lot, and a set of 3, spoons, use dawn dishsoap to lube. Tire goes on fine until the last 10-12 inches, then its a no go. Everything for me needs to be portable. I have a manual bead breaker that works great.
I thank all for the responces. Ill have it mounted this time when the tube comes in. Then when I need a new tire, ill remove tube and try to install the tire back on to see if I can get it on, as it is junk anyway. Off road is one thing, on road I have AAA, and can be towed up to 250 miles.
their is a couple simple cheep mounting, manual, machines, that I could break down and store in the back camper storage. I like the one that has the hitch mount to give leverage. That ones $400, I could get the $130 one and make the hitch mount when I get to my friends farm this spring.
comparing the stock soft tire to the bridgestone, is like a sponge to a rock.
Last few inches....thats where the 80% technique comes in. A story I've repeated a few times....tech day and one of the KLR owners was struggling with that last 10". After letting him struggle a bit I walked over and walked thru what you do...seconds later the tire is on. He's all happy and turned and was talking to others. I quickly slipped the tire back off and handed it back to him saying...try again. The look I got was unforgettable lol. A few tech days later he was now helping others with learning how to change tires. He went home and practiced installing his old tire repeatedly till he got the hang of it.


AAA or other services is a waste of time. You should be proficient enough to handle any tire repairs on the trail. Besides, I don't know where you ride but most of mine is in open desert. No cell phone to call AAA and besides...they would never travel off road anyways. Moot point. Learn to do your own tire changes. Great idea to practice with the old tire. I carry all my tools in a fanny pack. Again, if you are struggling you are doing it wrong.
 

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No cell phone to call AAA and besides...they would never travel off road anyways. Moot point. Learn to do your own tire changes. Great idea to practice with the old tire. I carry all my tools in a fanny pack. Again, if you are struggling you are doing it wrong.

Yep. Found this out on my first fall on the KLR. Not even half a mile of gravel & dirt, but no AAA service. The driver would have done it I paid him directly though. I dropped it on a slight hill and couldn’t get it up after I hit the dirt.

I have a Dirt Napper on order to help me get it up if I take a tumble like that in the future if you ride by yourself, be prepared to get yourself back on the trail by yourself too. Pavement, AAA is just fine.
 
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