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Chuck,

I think you should make a video and show how to do it. I had a Harbor Freight tire changer, a No MAr bar, and the little nylon clamping blocks for stand. For the life of me, I cold not get the tire changed. I was frustrated and sold it all. I had a local shop do all my tire changes. However, I'm now in a more rural area (we moved out of SoCal) and eventually would like to try doing my own again.
 

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Chuck,

I think you should make a video and show how to do it. I had a Harbor Freight tire changer, a No MAr bar, and the little nylon clamping blocks for stand. For the life of me, I cold not get the tire changed. I was frustrated and sold it all. I had a local shop do all my tire changes. However, I'm now in a more rural area (we moved out of SoCal) and eventually would like to try doing my own again.
Go back to page #2 on this thread. Flexiflier posted the youtube link that I had suggested as a video tutorial. Its a 5 or 6 part video(s). Doug does a couple things different than my technique but his works very well with offroad type tires i.e. KLR. I have different techniques depending on style of bike (heavy cruiser with tubes to sport bike tubeless) Spooning tires over tire balls or even Nutech Tubliss setup all require slight different method/tips. Fact is, if you can install a tire using tire balls or Michelin Moouse Bibs you are an official tire installation expert. Took me a LONG time to get where I could do those easily with basic tools. Technique is mandatory lol.


Over at .net I did a whole review of the Harbor Freight tire changer. Out of the box...not very good but with a couple key upgrades its actually not that bad. I did the same with a couple of the NoMar models. Out of the box they were worlds better than HF even after upgrades but a couple of their supplied 'tools' I didn't care for. With a doz or so tire changes trying different tools/methods I actually kept the basic NoMar model for my own shop. Previously I only used a 15" tire rim on a stand or for many years just a 16" drum. I still do sport bike tires on the 15" rim...still much faster than using the NoMar or any tire changer I've used over the years.
 

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I'm always interested in anything that can make trailside tire changing easier....that's why I brought up the question on the bead buddy.

Sent from my SM-J337W using Tapatalk
 

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I know you addressed this to Dave but like him I've changed hundreds of tires on all kinds of motorcycles. I didn't see the post where someone stated the bead buddy is not very effective but in my experience and using one for decades I can assure you it works exactly as designed....forces the bead to slip down into tire center. I keep one by my tire changing station and one in my fanny pack. Tire changing is 80% technique, 15% having the right tools and 5% effort.
Thanks Chuck.... I ordered one today, along with a couple other goodies for me for Christmas...lol

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Discussion Starter #45
So,,,, I thought I didn't stink at the front, but I also do. This past winter in TX, I had front go slowly flat, now few days ago have front going flat again. Just so happens I ordered the banjo no pinch tire tool, and it should be in any day now.
So ill be testing it out sooner than I thought, as front is getting worn, and I have a new on hand, but other is still good.
If I find another pinched tube, Ill be going tubeless.
 

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I have found dish soap makes a good lube, it also helps clean the rim when I wash it off. Over the years I have pinched a lot of tubes, I keep a good stash of tire patches on hand. Like I said before, if the tire design is made in a tubeless version they are easier. Like others posted, I only move my spoons 1"-2" at a time while keeping the trailing bead in the spoke well. Patience is the key!
 

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Hang in there; tubeless isn't better its only different. Wtih the right tools, decent tubes and proper technique, it isn't that hard. I haven't pinched a tube in 30 years now.

Dave
 

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When I was a wrench at Hollywood Honda back in the late Jurassic period tire and tube jobs came to me daily, sometimes a dozen a week. I got really good and really fast, never pinched a tube in several years. These days I take the sissy approach and run the tire and wheel down to the local shop.

At that time all the guys in our shop used WD-40 as lube. The WD was slick as can be while wet but evaporated quickly. Back then nobody worried that it might have a bad effect on the rubber. WD was also great for sliding on tight new hand grips and slipping switch gear wiring through handlebars.
 

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When I was a wrench at Hollywood Honda back in the late Jurassic period tire and tube jobs came to me daily, sometimes a dozen a week. I got really good and really fast, never pinched a tube in several years. These days I take the sissy approach and run the tire and wheel down to the local shop.

At that time all the guys in our shop used WD-40 as lube. The WD was slick as can be while wet but evaporated quickly. Back then nobody worried that it might have a bad effect on the rubber. WD was also great for sliding on tight new hand grips and slipping switch gear wiring through handlebars.
I still don't worry; I use WD to mount my tires to this day; it's been proven over several decades and thousands of tires IMO. ....and it isn't harmful to rubber. Additionally; Chain O-ring WD-40 exposure effects study and results
 

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That O-ring "study' was interesting. Glad to hear of someone else who uses WD on tires. I never really thought it hurt rubber but we're always hearing about some everyday product that's been around for decades has just been found to have killed a blade of grass once.
 

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Last few inches....thats where the 80% technique comes in. A story I've repeated a few times....tech day and one of the KLR owners was struggling with that last 10". After letting him struggle a bit I walked over and walked thru what you do...seconds later the tire is on. He's all happy and turned and was talking to others. I quickly slipped the tire back off and handed it back to him saying...try again. The look I got was unforgettable lol. A few tech days later he was now helping others with learning how to change tires. He went home and practiced installing his old tire repeatedly till he got the hang of it.


AAA or other services is a waste of time. You should be proficient enough to handle any tire repairs on the trail. Besides, I don't know where you ride but most of mine is in open desert. No cell phone to call AAA and besides...they would never travel off road anyways. Moot point. Learn to do your own tire changes. Great idea to practice with the old tire. I carry all my tools in a fanny pack. Again, if you are struggling you are doing it wrong.
So Chuck B, can you describe your masterful technique? I may have something similar but would love to learn a better way. line6
 

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That's a bummer to hear Dave. Is he ok? You know if he will be coming back, or is he done permanently?
He has had a bad knee for many years and had surgery a little while back......the results of which have convinced him to quit riding. He's in the process of selling off all his bike stuff and is concentrating on his side by side and Jeep and spending time with his young son. ....Happens to all of us eventually; My hips and knees are bad and I'm struggling to ride these days too.....I shake my head thinking it was only 10 years ago that I was racing competitively but I guess those hundreds of crashes are catching up with me quickly....

Dave
 

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I knew of and remember the knee surgery. Family and health are important, no doubt. This may sound selfish, but his knowledge will be sorely missed. I hope you are still able to stay with us a while, meaning on the board here, :). Be well Dave!!
 

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I knew of and remember the knee surgery. Family and health are important, no doubt. This may sound selfish, but his knowledge will be sorely missed. I hope you are still able to stay with us a while, meaning on the board here, :). Be well Dave!!
Thanks for the kind words; I have no immediate plans to quit riding or sell my KLR's.....hoping my stretching and exercise regime gives me a few more years. I agree; Chuck is a wealth of information and will be missed on the forums. I still keep in touch with him.

Cheers,
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #57
Sorry to hear about people with knee problems.
I have no idea why I don't/yet. 32 years doing linework I should.
SO, my banjo no pinch tool wont be in till next week. Its 82-84 and sunny hear. So I took front tire off and dropped it off yesterday, and hopefully it will be done today. New tube and new front tire, and he will do a perfect job on patching the other tube, or reuse it, and ill take the new one back.
( DPelletier ) If you remember, I posted a pick of my trimmed, hacked job of lowering my seat. Today, I am finally going to an upholsterer, to have it looked at, and made to look nice., I like the way I fitted it to my needs, but cant get the skin to fit nice. I think the guy is backed up till September. But can look at it.
For some reason I cant post a pic.....?????
 
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