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That's a loaded question if I ever heard one! Here's my list of completions so far (Thermo-Bob is on the to do list):

• Center stand – (Happy Trail)
• Explorer Lite Tank Bag – (Wolfman)
• Adjustable Touring Windshield – (Cee Bailey)
• Headlight Guard – (Cee Bailey)
• Master Cylinder Guard – (Dual Star)
• Low Profile Magnetic oil Drain Plug – (Dual Star)
• Serrated Foot Pegs – (Dual Star)
• Teton Aluminum Panniers / SU Rack – (Happy Trail)
• PD Crash Bars / Skid Plate – (Happy Trail)
• Bark Buster Storm Hand Guards – (Twisted Throttle)
• Doohickey w/ Torsion Spring – (Eagle Mike)
• Sub Frame Bolt Upgrade / Drill Through – (Eagle Mike)
• Fork Brace – (Eagle Mike)
• Fuzeblock

FYI: Beware of Dual Star. I won't buy from them again. Been waiting on some parts since January and they outright lied to me about the parts already being shipped.

FIRST: Crash bars are cheap, fairing parts are expensive! KLR's fall over like those fainting sheep do when threatened, get some protection!

Anyway, remember that the journey is the destination, take your time, do it right and enjoy the heck out of it!
 

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I would do the doo, swap out the front fender, ride it a while and see what you want. Thermo Bob, too maybe. The rest can easily wait.
 

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An accountant to tell you how much that list will cost. LOL
Oil plug is good to do at the first oil change, Do Hicky before 10,000mi, and the rest depends on how you ride, what changes in preformance you want and what you want the bike to do. Make it your bike! :)
 

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Since you have such a short (<2 mile) commute to work, it might not be a bad idea to invest in a battery trickle charger and install a charger jumper harness for easy access. Such short trips will not do much to keep the battery charged.

The Kawasaki tail bag is actually pretty nice and can come in very handy. Easy to take on and off.

Since you plan on using the motor for year-round commuting, heated grips will help to keep you happy.

The commute is short, but a brake light flasher and /or rear turn signal flashers will help to alert the cagers to your presence.

A nice LOUD horn can come in very handy.
 

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Obviously, I'll get a Doohickey, but also a Thermo Bob?

Magnetic Oil plug? What else?
Many people replace the "Doohickey" [Balancer Chain Adjuster Lever]. There was a time when the KLR 650 had an inadequately designed "Doohickey". The time frame of the known, problematic balancer levers began with the KLR 600, the predecessor to the KLR 650, and continued until the KLR 650 design change in the 2008 model. The early doohickey was made from two pieces of stamped steel with a very crude welding job that maintained tensions on the balancer chain system. There were many cases of broken components and broken welds, as well as tensioning spring failures. The springs broke, allowing the spring to float around the oil sump.

With the introduction of the 2008 model, we found that the new styled KLR 650 had a redesigned balancer lever, machined and more durable than the earlier levers, found in the pre-08 models. To the best of my knowledge, we have no verifiable reports of a balancer chain adjustment lever failure occurring in the Generation II [2008 and newer] KLR 650. No reports of catastrophic failure. Machine shops are not overwhelmed with KLR's with wore concentric shafts. Left engine case sales have not skyrocketed, due to balancer chain wear on the Gen II bikes. We are rapidly approaching the fourth year of production of this bike with this internal component. I believe it is safe to say that the issue has been resolved by Kawasaki, and replacement is fueled more by urban myth, than by actual need.

There remains, however, a tensioning spring issue. Many reports surface that the spring that applies the tension to this lever, doesn't. The spring is too long to supply adequate tension to the lever, and is under designed, loosing the little tension it supplied to begin with. There is a solution. There are replacement spring options available from a number of sources. It is a commonly held belief that this spring should be upgraded. There is little objective, rational support for replacement of the Gen II Doohickey. It is a solution for a problem that no longer exists. Invest the money in gasoline. I swear before all that is Holy and true that you will get more appreciable return for your money.

EDIT: I truly believe the best thing a new owner with any new bike can do, is put a thousand miles on it before they do anything. This will reveal what is needed much more so than the decisions made while under the influence of infatuation and / or Kool Aid.
 

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Paper, I purchased the Fuzeblock direct from direct from the company owner Curt at Fuzeblock.com. Very good person to deal with. Turns out that the item is made right here in Wisconsin! When I get some time, I'll post some pictures of the install.
 

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Upgrade suspension if your weight is greater than 160lb. It seems to me that suspension is overlooked by many, and not really understood by most.Yet proper suspension is what keeps our bikes on terra firma and makes for an enjoyable ride.(I am still figuring it out)
 

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If you are thinking about a windshield read what I just posted. I used to have a Goldwing and a full dress Hawk 400 both had fairings. After years of being spoiled by riding with a full fairing I don't like going without. The Cee Bailey I bought is pretty tall and I am not sure if I would like it off road.....time will tell.
 
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