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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone install one of these on their KLR? I figure it would save clutch wear and probably help in mud and on hills.
 

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The clutch is there to reduce the abuse on the transmission, not just for starting from a stand still, IMHO.

The KLR is not a high performance road racer, drag racer or motocrosser to be used pursuing a pot of gold at the finish line. But rather a usually durable, reliable pack mule. Some of the newer Gen 2's like yours have broken a gear engagement dog off of third gear, but no one seems to know Why or How that occasionally occurs.

I wouldn't encourage the use of a component which will make life even rougher for your transmission. The clutch plates can last up to 200,000 miles, or be roasted in 20 miles of sticky, gooey mud. The clutch is relatively cheap & easy to rebuild. Total engine disassembly to rebuild a transmission in neither cheap nor easy, for most owners.
 

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I'd think a REKLUSE CLUTCH (q.v.,) an autoclutch, manufactured for motorcycles) would be an installation superior to ignition-disabling and clutchless shifting.

When rpm approaches lower limits, the clutch automatically disengages; when rpm exceeds a limit, the clutch engages, without rider participation.

Not good for bump-starting, but eliminates engine stalling in difficult going.

Rode one once; motorcycle was "built" for a man who lost his left arm in a hit-and-run automobile accident (Yes, they caught the perpetrator. Light sentence, although (as far as he knew) he left the victim to die.).

Would take some getting used to; "manual" transmission drivetrains on ATVs have similarly-functioning autoclutches.

Enduro riders in my motorcycle club who have Rekluse clutches love 'em.
 

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The rekluse is a solid device and would certainly make the rougher stuff easier, particularly for a beginner. For the record you can push/bump start a rekluse equipped bike but you have to adjust the clutch first. I believe GoMotor has one on his.

Dave
 

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From my one and only experience with a customers KLR650 Recluse clutch, one Should Use the manual hand lever for Both up & down shifting for longest transmission life.

Its only advantage is non-stalling of the engine at low speeds. It does NOT Automatically dis-engage from the transmission during shifting. A local KTM rider who read his Recluse info confirmed it for me recently.
 

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It does NOT Automatically dis-engage from the transmission during shifting.
Quite so!
When rpm approaches lower limits, the clutch automatically disengages; when rpm exceeds a limit, the clutch engages, without rider participation.
As mentioned above, the "ignition interruption" doesn't automatically disconnect the engine from the drivetrain upon shifting.
. . . "manual" transmission drivetrains on ATVs have similarly-functioning autoclutches.
Similar, except . . . on "manual" ATVs, the shift lever mechanism momentarily disengages the engine from the clutch when shifting gears. Unless I'm mistaken, that's how our KLF300s work, anyway! :)

I'm surprised no CVT (Continuously Variable Transmissions) have made any significant inroads into motorcycling AFAIK (I'm unfamiliar with latter-day Honda "automatic" shifting). The Polaris-type variable-effective-radius belt sheave system delivers a versatile and truly automatic transmission; oughta be adaptable to motorcycles, seems to me.
 

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Quite so!As mentioned above, the "ignition interruption" doesn't automatically disconnect the engine from the drivetrain upon shifting.Similar, except . . . on "manual" ATVs, the shift lever mechanism momentarily disengages the engine from the clutch when shifting gears. Unless I'm mistaken, that's how our KLF300s work, anyway! :)

Most of the automatic clutch, foot shift ATV's from the Big 4 Japanese companies had a wet centrifugal Primary clutch (think very large chainsaw) and a common Multi-Plate wet clutch like a KLR. The multi-plate clutch was connected via mechanical linkage to the gear pedal. The first 2/3rds of pedal stroke dis-engaged the multi-plate clutch, the last 1/3rd of pedal stroke rotated the gear change drum. This allowed dis-connect between the engine and the transmission even if the throttle was still open. pdw

I'm surprised no CVT (Continuously Variable Transmissions) have made any significant inroads into motorcycling AFAIK (I'm unfamiliar with latter-day Honda "automatic" shifting). The Polaris-type variable-effective-radius belt sheave system delivers a versatile and truly automatic transmission; oughta be adaptable to motorcycles, seems to me.
The makers of the Rokon Trail-Blazer 2wd 'tote-goat' made a 250cc motocrosser back in the '70s. It did have CVT drive to the counter-sprocket. I think it made the wheelbase a little too long for a motocross bike. It even had moulded plastic wheels the 1st year.
 

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The makers of the Rokon Trail-Blazer 2wd 'tote-goat' made a 250cc motocrosser back in the '70s. It did have CVT drive to the counter-sprocket. I think it made the wheelbase a little too long for a motocross bike. It even had moulded plastic wheels the 1st year.
Interesting and useful motorcycle historical fact!

On Rokon wheels:

Some 2WD Rokons, I understand, had liquid (water or fuel) reservoirs.
 

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For a bike as "simple" as a KLR, I'd think that any CVT, HST or DCT would: A.) Be prohibitively expensive, and B.) In the case of HSTs and to a lessor extent CVT's the loss of efficiency would almost kill the performance of a 30-40 hp, 400+ lbs Bike. However, a DCT such as on the Honda Africa Twin and their new Goldwing might be fun without loosing any efficiency (in fact gaining a bit) . . . . OTOH, some might miss the ability to break the occasional Clutch and/or Shift Levers . . . .
 

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I agree the bike is pretty simple..... but then again I find that more fun. You don't have all that extra electronics and assistance. Its sometimes nice too be all me controlling the bike. Just my opinion though.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The speed shifter seems like a good idea because it doesn't really add a lot of complication and 1 wire would disconnect it. Sometimes you need to downshift in the middle of a hill and using the clutch is a non starter. Mud not so much but it would be nice not to loose momentum. On the road it would just be nice to not need to clutch for every shift.
 
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