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Discussion Starter #1
On the Gen 2 KLRs what is the distance from the bottom of the fork tube (straight down,as if you hung a plum bob ) to the floor/ ground. Also I need the distance from the front tire up to under the fender @lower triple tree. Unladen, but bike level. I read some one used an 8” block between when using tie down straps ( as when hauling the KLR on a trailer or in pick up bed) I hauled bikes in the past without a block or brace, but prefer to not put undue strain on the seals. Especially if I have to haul it 150-200 miles. Besides I have one of those nifty heavy plastic ones I used with my KDX or DRZ, but think it may be too long. Thanks.
 

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I'm getting 10" for ground to fork, and 8" from tire to fender.

When I picked up my 2nd gen, it rode with forks compressed from Florida to NC, to TX. I was mildly worried, but no ill effects from it. Enjoy your new ride!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The PC Racing and MSR brand mini MX'r fork spring saver works perfect on Gen 2 KLR's.
Thanks, The one I have is like 10” or 11”. I think I seen the mini fork spring saver, at the MC accessory store in town. Might need to visit them.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Not a space-walk, rodent!

:)

How did you transport your Indian Scout home from the dealership/seller?
I hauled it home from the dealer on a rental ( U-haul) “V” front trailer. I used a Canyon dancer bar strap from the bars ( not too tight) and soft ties looped around the forks right above the lower tree, pulled them down tight. Then soft ties looped through the frame right below seat to the center tie down rings, and the last set of soft ties looped at the top shock mount to the rear tie down rings. Then (2) more soft ties looped around frame on either side below seat to the upper trailer side rails. It did not move, but with that many ties I really did not have to compress the forks much. Had to haul it about 160 miles.
 

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I've never ever had an issue with strapping a bike to a trailer , hauling it 1,000+ miles and seen anything detrimental to the fork seals. When I worked on the road in construction, I took my bike with me wherever in the country I went and never blew out a fork seal. Probably trailered different bikes at least 25- 30,000 miles over the years.
The key is to NOT cinch it down so hard as you're overly compressing the springs. Think about it. hauling a bike with no rider as long as you leave at least 3/4 the travel of the tube available after tying it down couldn't be compressing the springs and fluid inside the forks any more than riding it off road with a 200 lb rider and a load of gear. The trailer springs also help to reduce suspension travel while hauling too unless you're hauling it on a car hauler with extra heavy springs.
I followed my cousin as he hauled his road glide to Florida one fall. he had the frame blocked so as to save his seals and with all the weight rigidly strapped to the trailer with none of the bike's suspension in play that trailer was the roughest ride that bike ever had.. Trailers float down the road with a bike on them if you let the bikes suspension help the trailer. Just be sure to use ties on the hooks so as the forks compress the straps won't come unhooked.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the advice. I had hauled many a bike in trailers, and I never had a fork seal problem either. On my trailers I had floor and side tie down locations. I felt 100% sure nothing was going to fall or slip. Even if one tie down failed, I’m sure nothing would have happened. Here’s my take on this issue now. First I’m hauling in a short bed truck. I had front, center, and rear floor anchor points. The bed is a heavy composit bed. I’ve reinforced my tailgate, so it’s good. I don’t want to rely as much on the perimeter rail tie downs. What that means is I’m going to chinch down the floor anchors a little more than I would otherwise. I’ve used my head and have tied down and hauled all sorts and sizes of MCs for at least 40 yrs now, mostly in trailers I built. Never an incident. Overkill ? Maybe so. Either way ,having a block or brace between the tire and up under the fork tree makes me feel better. Thanks.
 

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Please post a picture of the transport rig you're fabricating, with the KLR650 loaded, rodent64. Safe transit appears assured by your meticulous, detailed planning and execution.

You mention, "short bed." A REALLY short bed, like a Honda Ridgeline's, or a Chevy Avalanche's, or a Cadillac Escalade EXT's, a Subaru Brat's, a Ford Explorer Sport Trac's, or a Lincoln Blackwood's? I've loaded motorcycles somewhat cross-wise, when available bed length was limited because of toolboxes, cargo, etc., avoiding loading packed weight on tailgate.
 

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I like that you're getting all your ducks in a row before the purchase, Rodent64. It's weird, but I notice that for some reason I have the impression like you've been here a while already, even though you're kinda new (as am I). I hope you score an awesome bike.
 

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Just be sure to use ties on the hooks so as the forks compress the straps won't come unhooked.
I personally prefer to use a simple bunjie strap or rubber snubber between the eyes of the 2 tie-down hooks to ensure that the Lower hook Can Not disengage, when the truck or trailer hits a pot-hole or when driving around corners or entering/exiting driveways or alleys.
 

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I personally prefer to use a simple bunjie strap or rubber snubber between the eyes of the 2 tie-down hooks to ensure that the Lower hook Can Not disengage, when the truck or trailer hits a pot-hole or when driving around corners or entering/exiting driveways or alleys.
I've found the cheap zip ties work great.
 

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I've broken so many cheap zip-ties that I won't trust any of them to hold anything heavier than a feather. Too damned brittle.

I can see when a bunjie cord or rubber snubber has been chaffed or sliced. They can easily absorb 6 inches of compression or sway on a tie down strap and keep the lower hook engaged.
 

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I'm thinking you're misunderstanding my method. You put the hook through the eye, then zip the hook tight to the eye so if the strap goes slack momentarily, the hook stays in place as though the strap is still tight. There is zero strain on the zip ties.
 

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Bunjie cords are re-usable 1000 times and for other purposes. Zip-ties are not usually re-useable. I've always got 2 bunjies on my rear rack & 2-4 more in my tank bag. With probably 6 more in my saddlebags or riding gear bag at any one time. Usually 4-6 rubber snubbers in the pick-up truck.
 

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whatever works for ya. Main thing is to find a way to make sure the hook won't disengage from the eye when the straps go slack. I've done it several ways. Just found the zip ties got the job done OK and didn't cost enough to worry about re usability..
 

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Bunjie cords are re-usable 1000 times and for other purposes. Zip-ties are not usually re-useable. I've always got 2 bunjies on my rear rack & 2-4 more in my tank bag. With probably 6 more in my saddlebags or riding gear bag at any one time. Usually 4-6 rubber snubbers in the pick-up truck.
You're not in a preparedness/readiness contest with rodent64, are you?

:)
 

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I've broken so many cheap zip-ties that I won't trust any of them to hold anything heavier than a feather. Too damned brittle.

I can see when a bunjie cord or rubber snubber has been chaffed or sliced. They can easily absorb 6 inches of compression or sway on a tie down strap and keep the lower hook engaged.
I only use Walmart zip ties for noncritical uses like bundling wires hidden away from the sun. The UV makes them brittle in less than 12 months. For real outside work I buy zip ties at an electrical supply house. Those are UV rated and will last years outside. I have some on my TV antenna mast that are 10 years hold and holding strong.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I only use Walmart zip ties for noncritical uses like bundling wires hidden away from the sun. The UV makes them brittle in less than 12 months. For real outside work I buy zip ties at an electrical supply house. Those are UV rated and will last years outside. I have some on my TV antenna mast that are 10 years hold and holding strong.
Agree, the good ones have the little metal tongue that bites into the strip part. Good one time, best for mc handlebars, holding wires and such and sun won’t break down, and you can tighten the hell outta them. I believe the last pkg was $25 <> for 100 of the 7 or 8” ones from Home improvement store. I do use the lesser ones from HF for other applications where not critical or temporary.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I'm thinking you're misunderstanding my method. You put the hook through the eye, then zip the hook tight to the eye so if the strap goes slack momentarily, the hook stays in place as though the strap is still tight. There is zero strain on the zip ties.
I have used black electrical tape many times to run through the anchor loop and around the hook seems to work good ,for me anyway . Cheap @ $5 for 8or10 rolls from HF.
 
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