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Discussion Starter #1
I'm always interested in hearing other peoples' opinions on this subject. Do you prefer regular inner tubes, the heavy tubes or the "ultra heavy duty" tubes and why? Got any opinions on the pros and cons of any of these types of tubes?
 

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I like Heavy Duty tubes.. With a touch of air in them to have them hold shape, I've never pinched one.. And they're pretty easy to find, where the Extra HD's are sometimes tough to locate..
 

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I chose the IRC Extra HD; found them on the Internet somewhere. I carry regular tubes as spares because they're about half the size and weight of the UHD's when folded up and are easier and quicker to change roadside if necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Maybe my choice of tubes is a subliminal psychological thing because I'm big and fat: tend to lean toward "King Size" clothes, "Big Man's" recliners, etc.
 

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I have come to prefer the standard tube over HD. I've also become more interested in tube construction and materials than their thickness. A spike that makes its way through a tire casing won't be slowed down much by a few millimeters thicker tube.

I look for lap-spliced tubes over butt-spliced tubes. Higher rubber content than synthetic content. I just trust the lap joint over the butt joint, although I've never had a separation of either. I tend to believe the higher rubber content tube will take a patch better. I have nothing to base this idea on other than I have had patches come loose from predominately synthetic constructed tubes. I don't recall having a patch not stay adhered on a high rubber content tube.

I wear XL gloves. Getting my paws under a bead to feed a valve stem through the hole is challenging enough without raising the bar by using a tube that won't cooperate. HD tubes are expensive and hard for me to manipulate. I have a Michelin standard 21" tube on the front of the 650, with about 30,000 miles on it. It will be retired after this tire it is mated to wears out. How much more should a reasonable person expect from a dispensable item like an inner tube? If your tire breaks loose in the rough, and you do not use rim locks, that tube is probably going to get shredded, regardless of quality or thickness. I see that as a false security. I think everyone should use what works for them, including what makes them feel more secure about the whole experience. I just can't justify the expense, weight and difficulty in handling anymore.

...and this is about as close to a tire thread as I will get. I truly DGAF what you roll on.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Interesting thoughts about materials and construction that a wise man should consider. I don't think it's a noticeable difference (we're talking a couple psi over a long period of time) but I think I read somewhere that synthetic rubber also loses air (through the rubber itself) faster than natural rubber.

I know what you mean about big hands and valve stems. I simply cannot do it without a fishing tool, but somebody on here mentioned holding the wheel and tire vertically with the stem hole at the bottom and getting the stem to drop down through it that way which I thought was a pretty good idea.
 

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I'm always interested in hearing other peoples' opinions on this subject. Do you prefer regular inner tubes, the heavy tubes or the "ultra heavy duty" tubes and why? Got any opinions on the pros and cons of any of these types of tubes?

If you run reduced pressure for off-road get ultra HD tubes. They don't resist a nail any better but they do resist pinch flats better. A KLR is heavy and softly suspended (compared to a dirt bike), easy to smash the tire on stuff.

The only drawback I've found with ultra HD tubes is that they trend to lose air faster than regular tubes, more natural rubber in the construction I guess.

I've run the same utlra HD tubes through many tire changes so the higher intial cost works out seems like.

BTW if your having problems with the valve stem might want to change your technique. It's shouldn't be a struggle and you don't need a special tool.

Check this thread and part 2 of the video I posted.
 
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