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I am getting spares and tools put together for an upcoming week long ride in the ID/MT back country, and would like to have a spare set of tubes to bring along.

My question is whether there is an advantagedisadvantage to the heavy duty tubes, and also if anyone could recommend a high quality brand. I don't necessarily want the cheapest. Did some searching but not a lot of info out there that I could find.

thanks in advance!
 

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Personally I don't spend the money on heavy duty tubes and have never had an issue other than one I caused myself. Kenda, Bridgestone, Moose - all make good tubes. Check Rocky Mountain ATV and see what they sell.
 

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I just installed new tires for a 5-6,000 mile trip. I also bought spare tubes. I got the thinnest and thus smallest packed size I could find because they are just backups taking up space in my bags.

I also carry a patch kit but, a quick flat as opposed to a slow leak can pull the stem out of a tube and that can't be patched.

If you are ridding really hard with really low pressures over sharp rock ledges, heavy duty tubes are good. I ride lots of dirt roads, two tracks and trails but, not at high speeds like a racer.
 

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Sounds like just a standard tube is the favored way to go. I won't be running really low pressures over sharp rocks, and being as they are spares, the weight savings is a good consideration. Thanks for the feedback.
 

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HD tubes in the bike; Moose, Bridgestone, Dunlop, Michelin......usually Bridgestone for me and standard tubes in the pack (big difference in size and weight). Avoid the "extra HD" tubes as they are said to increase heat and friction during sustained high speed use.

Dave
 

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HD tubes in the bike; Moose, Bridgestone, Dunlop, Michelin......usually Bridgestone for me and standard tubes in the pack (big difference in size and weight). Avoid the "extra HD" tubes as they are said to increase heat and friction during sustained high speed use.

Dave
Obviously I agree about carrying smaller and lighter tubes in my bags. There is a large difference between the lightest and the heaviest. I only get a flat every 12,000 miles or so and the flats have never been pinch flats that heavy tubes help protect against, but from nails, screws, wires and staples which will puncture a heavy tube as easily as a light one.

I also have heard that heavy tubes cause more heat, but have never seen any information on why, how much and the extent of the consequences. Running low pressure makes the tires run warmer, but we do it. Maybe low pressure and heavy tubes would run a little warmer, but how would that affect the heavy tube. Notice how much better "a little warmer" sounds than "hotter"?

Has anybody seen specific information on this?
 

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Obviously I agree about carrying smaller and lighter tubes in my bags. There is a large difference between the lightest and the heaviest. I only get a flat every 12,000 miles or so and the flats have never been pinch flats that heavy tubes help protect against, but from nails, screws, wires and staples which will puncture a heavy tube as easily as a light one.

I also have heard that heavy tubes cause more heat, but have never seen any information on why, how much and the extent of the consequences. Running low pressure makes the tires run warmer, but we do it. Maybe low pressure and heavy tubes would run a little warmer, but how would that affect the heavy tube. Notice how much better "a little warmer" sounds than "hotter"?

Has anybody seen specific information on this?
Sorry, I don't. I read the opinions about the subject from some people I trust but it could well be urban myth.....it was never an issue in my background (offroad motorcycle racing).

Low tire pressures for offroad and rocky conditions are why I run HD tubes.....I've even ripped the valve stems out of cheap tubes due to low pressures. Rim locks would prevent that, but I haven't bothered with them (yet).

I'm interested in anything anyone can add on the subject.

Cheers,
Dave
 

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I did find this on a motorcycle forum where the poster had written to Michelin about using heavy duty tubes on the road:

The reply from Michelin regarding 4mm tubes for road use...

With reference to Michelin Off Road Tubes (UHD ultra heavy duty etc) we would advise that they are for off road use, however although it may not be illegal to fit off road tubes to a road going motorcycle, it is still not to our recommendations
 

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Good enough for me. I used to run the UHD's in some of my race bikes and they are THICK! I used to joke that you could just glue knobs to them....

I think I'll stick with regular HD tubes by one of the higher end manufacturers and use the cheap light ones as emergency "get home" spares. Another thing I've noticed is that with some of the light "non rubber" tubes they can split or tear in the event of a puncture which makes it impossible to patch...


Dave
 

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A little research provided this:
---------------------------------------------------------------
"The fundamental phenomenon behind the heat generation in tyres is the friction between molecules when the rubber in the structure of the tyre is under a kinematic deformation by a continuous compression-tension or torsion [2]. This kinematic deformation is known as the hysteresis effect. In fact, as the tyre
rolls and flexes, a portion of the motive power transmitted to the tyre is absorbed due to the tyre hysteresis and thus converted into heat and consequently the tyre temperature increases."
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The hysteresis generated heat happens each time the tire flexes, so twice as much heat is generated at 60 mph as at 30 mph.

So a heavier duty "thicker" tube adds to the thickness of the tire/tube combination and increases the heat generated by the "hysteresis effect". It also provides additional insulation between the air in the tube and the metal wheel reducing the heat dissipated by the wheel. Running at highway speeds produces the heat even faster.

Hotter rubber is weaker rubber and the tires ware faster.



A
 

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Good job and thanks. I doubt increased tire tread wear is an issue but increased heat is a bad thing. The real questions is; does using an ultra hd tube (like Bridgestones' UHD tubes) on a KLR at sustained highway speeds at the recommended tire pressures lead to premature or catastrophic failure and if so, what is the incidence?

....as usual, we will never know but the info is enough to suggest that the collective wisdom (i.e. don't run Extra/Ultra HD tubes in a street driven motorcycle) may have merit.


Cheers,
Dave
 
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