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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm Cheap on most things, no problem spending if worth it... Always used Regular cheap n no issues in commuter car... But newer Gen 3 definitely Nicest thing I've ever had so far!.. IS High Test worth the extra $, help run better or longer? Any experience good or bad? Should I stop being cheap n buy better fuel
 

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KLR does not want or need high octane, but if you can find no-ethanol gas , That is worth going out of your way for it.
I am lucky that a Shell station very near my house has no-ethanol 90. Don't need the 90 but the no-ethanol is worth it.
 

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I'm Cheap on most things, no problem spending if worth it... Always used Regular cheap n no issues in commuter car... But newer Gen 3 definitely Nicest thing I've ever had so far!.. IS High Test worth the extra $, help run better or longer? Any experience good or bad? Should I stop being cheap n buy better fuel
I run non ethanol 89. I've run cheap gas in other bikes. But were daily riders and I kept the tanks full to eliminate moisture build up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oh Cool gotcha. Appreciate it, luckily I have one right around corner also that has non ethanol. I'll try that... I haven't even got it in any good dirt yet, but still Too FUN to go cheap on
 

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I'm Cheap on most things, no problem spending if worth it... Always used Regular cheap n no issues in commuter car... But newer Gen 3 definitely Nicest thing I've ever had so far!.. IS High Test worth the extra $, help run better or longer? Any experience good or bad? Should I stop being cheap n buy better fuel
There is an old wives tale or myth that has been around ever since the creation of different octane fuels. It goes like this: "Higher octane fuels will increase the performance of my engine." Sorry Margaret it does not work that way.

Looking at your owners manual online it recommends a minimum of 87 octane. I would run 87 just as I do in my 2014 KLR.
You can run 89 or 91 if you want but you will not gain any performance, in fact you may actually lose some performance.

Higher octane fuel is designed for higher compression engines to prevent pre-ignition or knock which over time will damage your engine. The higher the octane the slower the burn which eliminates the pre-ignition problem.
If you talk with an engine dyno tuner he will confirm performance loss going to higher octane fuel unnecessarily. I have heard dyno reports of several horsepower loss on engines in the 100 HP class.

So save your hard earned money and smile every time you fill up with good o'l 87 octane. Remember to thank Brandon too for your pain at the pump.

This article demonstrates this on the dyno. It is an accurate test as no tuning on the engine is done during the test. 3 fuel octanes were tested.

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Definitely not mechanic, but my simple common sense brain. Also took me to something like that. Would think they would design engine to run on fuel Available. But just a jack of all, master of none... Yeah Brandon been cutting bottoms outta my pockets all year.... Been Empty ALOT lately!
 

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I only use Non Ethanol. Unfortunately you have to buy the expensive 91 octane where I live to get it. Ethanol eats aluminum. If your bike sits at all, it is doing bad things. If you run it constantly, you are probably ok, but my bike has to sit sometimes due to weather and work.

Project farm on Youtube did a test of ethanol gas compared to non-ethanol that verified this.

He also did a test on Heat and other water removal products. They were pretty much a failure.
 

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Yeah Brandon been cutting bottoms outta my pockets all year.... Been Empty ALOT lately!
You and me both, along with the rest of the country.
87 octane is what I use in my klr.
If it sits long (which it doesn’t very often), I’ll dump in a little stabil 360 marine. It helps combat ethanol damage.
FYI, The LP frame seems to account for a weee bit better mileage :ROFLMAO:

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You and me both, along with the rest of the country.
87 octane is what I use in my klr.
If it sits long (which it doesn’t very often), I’ll dump in a little stabil 360 marine. It helps combat ethanol damage.
FYI, The LP frame seems to account for a weee bit better mileage :ROFLMAO:

View attachment 36950
I saw a long term test on fuel stabilizers and the Stabil 360 was the best of them all. I always used SeaFoam, but it was ineffective as a stabilizer. I still love it for cleaning.
 

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I saw a long term test on fuel stabilizers and the Stabil 360 was the best of them all. I always used SeaFoam, but it was ineffective as a stabilizer. I still love it for cleaning.
Same here. Both the stabil & seafoam are pricey tho. Better than ethanol damage I suppose.
 

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You and me both, along with the rest of the country.
87 octane is what I use in my klr.
If it sits long (which it doesn’t very often), I’ll dump in a little stabil 360 marine. It helps combat ethanol damage.
FYI, The LP frame seems to account for a weee bit better mileage :ROFLMAO:

View attachment 36950
Brilliant minds think alike! My Brandon sticker fits perfectly on my back fender.

Automotive tail & brake light Tire Automotive lighting Hood Wheel
 

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KLR does not want or need high octane, but if you can find no-ethanol gas , That is worth going out of your way for it.
I am lucky that a Shell station very near my house has no-ethanol 90. Don't need the 90 but the no-ethanol is worth it.
This. Furthermore, I've used Stabil and Seafoam and still had ethanol problems; best thing is to avoid using ethanol at all if possible.

Dave
 

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What kind of Fuel Grade to use is like Oil threads. It can start wars.

Here's my opinion only:

If you have to ask what others are using, then use 87 Octane.

For me, I use 91 Octane for the added detergents to help keep my engine clean. It makes me feel better and I am 100% comfortable with that. And if I were riding at higher elevation and its hot out and I'm climbing up a steep hill, it might help my engine too. The KLR's comp ratio is 10:1. It doesn't need 91 but it doesn't hurt it either. I don't mind paying extra for my bike and it's my bank account. I also run 91 on all my other bikes, including high comp bikes.
 

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" I use 91 Octane for the added detergents "

Pretty sure that is a false statement. I've never seen evidence that more detergent is added to a fuel just because it's a higher octane blend. If your desire is to use any octane fuel that has more detergents, you simply need to use those brands listed as "Top Tier".
 

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" I use 91 Octane for the added detergents "

Pretty sure that is a false statement. I've never seen evidence that more detergent is added to a fuel just because it's a higher octane blend. If your desire is to use any octane fuel that has more detergents, you simply need to use those brands listed as "Top Tier".
No but it usually is when you use a big name gas station. And I honestly don't want to argue why I use 91 octane. I just do and I would never tell anyone not to use 87 simply because I don't.
 

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Interesting. You're right in many instances. It seems that even at Exxon/Mobil stations there can be variability (on if the 87 is top tier or not). I'm going to guess this depends on the number of actual tanks they have to house different fuel variations/blends or due to their local market demands. Sounds like some stations take advantage of this to create/advertise a lower price point. Buyer beware.
In other cases (Costco as an example) all of their dispensed fuels, regardless of octane level meet the Top Tier standard.
Now for clarity, just because a fuel is 91 (or higher) octane doesn't mean it's Top Tier. It's clear that multiple brands do not contain higher detergents regardless of their posted octane level. For those who have not already suffered through threads on this topic, "Top Tier" & "Octane" are two completely different and independent things.

Going back to your statement OCL " I use 91 Octane for the added detergents " would simply be more accurate if one added "for the stations I go to".

I know I'll pay more attention when fueling up at places other than my usual haunts.
 

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" I use 91 Octane for the added detergents "

Pretty sure that is a false statement. I've never seen evidence that more detergent is added to a fuel just because it's a higher octane blend. If your desire is to use any octane fuel that has more detergents, you simply need to use those brands listed as "Top Tier".
What I have dealt with is a timing issues on low compession engines that build alot of dynamic compression. A new engine might knock on everything but sunoco 94 and one race later or 6,000 miles later same bike runs like a scalded dog on 87. Cam chain wear will retard the intake valve closing and the reason why 87 works so well. Its not like everyone gets a degree wheel out on a new engine to verify timing changes through wear cycles. If it knocks jump octane.
 
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