Kawasaki KLR Forum banner
21 - 40 of 59 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
208 Posts
When I was a teenager back during Nixon days, I worked in a Texaco station in my home town. I wore a green stripe
Texaco shirt and pumped FireChief and SuperChief gas. Havoline motor oil came in a metal can, mostly 30weight.
On days when the tanker truck came, it said Texaco on both sides. The truck driver also wore a Texaco shirt.
Post up a smile emogee if you remember those days.
Nowadays the tank truck has no markings anymore and I wonder if any of us know what the hell we are putting in our
tanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
All 2022 owners can refer to pages 63-66 of the 2022 klr owners manual. And I cant believe the owners manual is wrong concerning minimum fuel requirements or octane increase to deal with knock. Or corrosion issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Good conversation here. Years ago I was a fire fighter. Just as a professional pilot must go to training frequently, so too the Fire Service requires lots of training.

One training episode we went to our local fuel depot/terminal where gas, diesel, and jet fuel is stored. The tanks are above ground and have a floating roof that actually lays directly on top of the product. It is super important that there not be any room for vapor space. This is to prevent a fire or explosion as liquid fuel does not burn. Only the fuel vapor when mixed with a combustible ratio of oxygen will burn. We actually got to walk around on the floating roof of a tank.

As part of our tour of the facility we were instructed on how the delivery process works. The fuels come from Bakersfield where Chevron has a refinery. There is a large pipe that runs along highway 99 in which the fuel travels north to Fresno and the storage facility. ALL brands of gas heading to Fresno are exactly the same. The differences are in the additive package. "Top tier gas additive packages must meet certain minimum requirements to qualify as a top tier gas. If they do they can call themselves top tier. Also it is perfectly ok to craft your additive package above the minimum requirements. Good luck trying to find out what is actually in these top tier gasses. Trade secrets and fancy names, and secret handshakes are the norm.

Back to the process. Transport trucks are filled at the storage terminal at which time the additive package is added. Obviously each brand has their own special blend of additives. Who has the best package??? Your guess is as good as mine.

Happy fueling fellas.

Cloud Sky Silo Storage tank Power station
 

·
Registered
2022 Pearl Lava Orange KLR650
Joined
·
40 Posts
It's worth it to buy premium if it is sourced from a Top Tier supplier. Not so much for the higher octane but premium fuel does contain more/different additives that are good for keeping everything clean, particularly the injector and the portion of the intake valves exposed to the incoming air/fuel mixture. Speaking from experience in the fuel business, and yes, I practice what I preach.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
What I have dealt with is a timing issues on low compession engines that build alot of dynamic compression. A new engine might knock on everything but sunoco 94 and one race later or 6,000 miles later same bike runs like a scalded dog on 87. Cam chain wear will retard the intake valve closing and the reason why 87 works so well. Its not like everyone gets a degree wheel out on a new engine to verify timing changes through wear cycles. If it knocks jump octane.
As a former hot rodder in the 80's and 90's, I am acutely aware of the relationship between comp ratios, octane levels, and timing.

All of my motors were 10.1:1 or higher compression. My `70 Torino GT's stock 351C 4V came with 10.7:1 stock.

Back then, all gas was ethanol-free, but I had to run 90-92 octane fuel. If not, then I had to retard the timing a bit to avoid pre-detonation.

Higher octane allows more timing, which produced more mid and upper rpm horsepower.

Today, I run the cheap stuff in my boring cars and 91 octane ethanol-free in my KLR. Not due to the octane, but due to ethanol-free. Engines that sit for a while do not do well with ethanol.

At nearly 60 mpg, paying the extra $.80 per gallon is cheap insurance.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,475 Posts
Thanks for that, Hawkerjet. Wish I knew how to enlarge the red, yellow & black Ethanol Problems blocks.

Been a while since anyone has linked this,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Just remember... ETHANOL is NOT your friend, PERIOD!!! Avoid it at all costs!!!

Sta-bil IS your friend if you are going to let your Bike sit for more than a few weeks. Be sure to only use fresh Sta-bil (has a shelf life of one year or less once opened) and dose properly for time of storage.

"ISO-Heat" is an additive if you want an isopropanol additive to use for keeping water out of your tank.

Willie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
As a former hot rodder in the 80's and 90's, I am acutely aware of the relationship between comp ratios, octane levels, and timing.

All of my motors were 10.1:1 or higher compression. My `70 Torino GT's stock 351C 4V came with 10.7:1 stock.

Back then, all gas was ethanol-free, but I had to run 90-92 octane fuel. If not, then I had to retard the timing a bit to avoid pre-detonation.

Higher octane allows more timing, which produced more mid and upper rpm horsepower.

Today, I run the cheap stuff in my boring cars and 91 octane ethanol-free in my KLR. Not due to the octane, but due to ethanol-free. Engines that sit for a while do not do well with ethanol.

At nearly 60 mpg, paying the extra $.80 per gallon is cheap insurance.
I dont get spark knock on the klr running 89 non ethanol but I do run 87 in some of my mod gx clone motors. The local 87 starting in springtime changed and doesnt knock but I do get more kickback on startup. Makes great bottom end power. Stinks like diesel and has me tempted to spec the intake valves on the tighter side of the spec. But power is awsome and I would never run that crap in my bike.
 

·
Registered
2008 klr650
Joined
·
59 Posts
Just remember... ETHANOL is NOT your friend, PERIOD!!! Avoid it at all costs!!!

Sta-bil IS your friend if you are going to let your Bike sit for more than a few weeks. Be sure to only use fresh Sta-bil (has a shelf life of one year or less once opened) and dose properly for time of storage.

"ISO-Heat" is an additive if you want an isopropanol additive to use for keeping water out of your tank.

Willie
what i am questioning is why iso-heat is even needed if running ethynol in the gas.... the iso heat is essentially alcohol that mixes with and keeps water from freezing so that it doesn't create a blockage in your fuel tank/line carb.... wouldn't ethynol do the same if it is already in the gas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
what i am questioning is why iso-heat is even needed if running ethynol in the gas.... the iso heat is essentially alcohol that mixes with and keeps water from freezing so that it doesn't create a blockage in your fuel tank/line carb.... wouldn't ethynol do the same if it is already in the gas?
Ethanol is very damaging to aluminum and some rubbers over time. Isopropanol is not. Both CAN be used to keep water at bay in a fuel system. If one feels the need for an additive for water if the tank, I've found this to be the best.

I value my fuel system and engine. Ethanol is good for drinking if you enjoy a cocktail every now and then. It's NOT good as a fuel additive, PERIOD!

Ethanol can be used as a fuel if the fuel system has been designed and equipped to run it. If running it as a pure fuel, it requires a much greater volume of fuel when compared to gas. So... while it is being used as an octane improving additive, it is thinning out your gas a little bit. Not much...

Willie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
The manual has info on ethanol and methanol blends. Also when to use corrosion inhibitors. The fuel pump failures have me wondering about what fuel is being used. Or if bikes sat in cargo containers for a long time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,475 Posts
If the fuel being used in the 2022 KLR's was the issue, wouldn't all other vehicles be susceptible to the same failures.

My thought is that the Quality Control of the individual Components that make up the fuel pump motors suffered alongside everything else during the Covid crisis. And the failures will be totally random thru the first year models. Rather than in a select serial number grouping.
Chances are that other Kawasaki models & other brands & models purchasing fuel pump motors from that same supplier are having similar failures.
I'll let someone else research the other Models forums & other Brands forums.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DNO

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
Octane in gasoline is there to lower the ignition point of the fuel. If you have a high compression engine, you need more octane to prevent premature ignition prior to the spark from the heat generated from compressing the fuel mix. If you have a low performance healthy engine with relatively low compression and you use a high octane fuel it can actually hurt performance as your ignition is timed to fire based on the compression ratio and recommended fuel requirements. You no doubt won't feel any difference between 87 and 92, but the 92 isn't making you faster and possibly even slower. These days, all top tier fuel uses plenty of detergents in regular grade whereas in the old days premium had much more detergents. Today, there is no real difference in detergent levels between octane grades. It is your money so spend as you wish, just don't think it is doing any benefit.
All that said, say you have been overly jetted for the last 30,000 miles and your combustion chamber is all carboned up, your compression ratio is now also higher and you may benefit from high octane to stop pinging.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Maybe fuel quality control suffered alond with the wrong pump parts per region. I cant remember any bike where the manual goes into such detail over fuel quality. And corrosion additives. I checked my 2022 yamaha manual to compare. Yamaha recommends not to use methanol blends. Kawasaki states any methanol blend must be blended with cosolvents and corrosion inhibitors. Kawi also recommends the use of STA-BIL for 30days of not operating on page 65 in the NOTICE box.
I might just add a little tcw3 and forget about it.
 

·
Premium Member
KLRs: 2013, 2005, 1998; 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
Joined
·
2,557 Posts
DNO, thanks for the reference to the 2022 owners manual—it recommends “STA-BIL” by brand name, huh? That’s a pretty strong recommendation, coming direct from the manufacturer. I think I’ll give it a try in my bikes.
 

·
Registered
2022 Pearl Lava Orange KLR650
Joined
·
40 Posts
When I was a teenager back during Nixon days, I worked in a Texaco station in my home town. I wore a green stripe
Texaco shirt and pumped FireChief and SuperChief gas. Havoline motor oil came in a metal can, mostly 30weight.
On days when the tanker truck came, it said Texaco on both sides. The truck driver also wore a Texaco shirt.
Post up a smile emogee if you remember those days.
Nowadays the tank truck has no markings anymore and I wonder if any of us know what the hell we are putting in our
tanks.
My dad operated a Texaco station in my hometown until the late 90's. It was my first job and I wore the same green shirt. Before that, he drove the tank truck with Texaco on the sides. Believe it or not, where I live, I can remember when leaded Sky Chief was $.23/gallon AND it was 98 octane. Good times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
My dad operated a Texaco station in my hometown until the late 90's. It was my first job and I wore the same green shirt. Before that, he drove the tank truck with Texaco on the sides. Believe it or not, where I live, I can remember when leaded Sky Chief was $.23/gallon AND it was 98 octane. Good times.
Ha, that's pretty funny. I can remember pulling into a Clark or Purple Martin station in my '57 Ford, and saying "gimme a buck ethyl". Good times indeed.
 
21 - 40 of 59 Posts
Top