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Discussion Starter #1
I had a request for information on the jack I carry with me on long distance dirt rides, so here it is.

Even though I only have the use of one good foot for lifting, I can lift an unloaded KLR on a flat hard surface, but one that is loaded for long distance dirt routes and dropped in sand or mud is a different matter even after removing the luggage. It is handy to have a jack to get it back up on two wheels.

Once on the Trans-America Trail and once on the Trans-Canada Adventure Trail on seldom traveled side tracks of the main trail I dropped the bike and pinned my leg under it. Fortunately I had the jack with me and had the bike up and off me in a few minutes.

I carry the jack shown in the photos attached to my tail box with nylon wing nuts for easy access. It is a cut off load minder bar for 18 wheeler trailers. Dock & Truck Equipment | Cargo-Restraint Bars | Folding Steel Cargo Bar & Load Stabilizer | 241300 - GlobalIndustrial.com

The first one I made was an $11.00 1" round one for SUVs and pickups. It stripped its teeth on the forth lift. That was one of the times my leg was pinned, but it got me free before stripping. So, went for the stronger one.

I found that I could make a scabbard along the left subframe member where some put a tool tube, but since I always have the tail box, it is handier there.
 

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The jack idea is great..
I could not help but notice the rear brake set-up, I assume that is a hand control?

You are truly a inspiration!
I am glad to see someone out there still understands that there is no such word as "can't".
That is what I am trying to teach my kids.. I tell them "use your brain" (in a nice way) and make them figure out how to solve difficult tasks for them selves... it is a art, and it's dying.
Now days if they cant buy it new, they don't want it, if it breaks, throw it out... sad...

Gordon
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The jack idea is great..
I could not help but notice the rear brake set-up, I assume that is a hand control?............
Yes. It's just another clutch cable run up to a second lever on the left bar. I used a narrower light switch without a choke/enricher lever to make room for the second lever perch on the bar and moved the enricher down to the side of the carburetor.

I added a Rekluse auto-clutch so that if I am full bore braking with both hands I don't have to worry about having to hit the gas at the end with a dead engine. Not really necessary, but helpful.
 

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Good stuff GoMotor! But I'm missing something...can't tell from the pics how the jack catches the bike solidly enough to lift the weight. What am I missing?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Photo #5 shows a 1/8" cable attached to the frame. I clip it into the loop on the jack.

Had to make some modifications to keep from gouging the seat.
 

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Gomotor, this is a few years down the road from your original post...

It looks like you eliminated the folding piece, shortened the upper piece to about 4 feet, and attached the foot to the upper piece. I ordered one, so I'll evaluate it when it arrives. Just trying to get a feel for what I'll be doing. Thanks for a great way to lift a downed bike.

Alan
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, I just cut the jacking head off the square tube extension section and kept the section with teeth for the head. It is about three feet long. The foot is already on that section. The bike is still leaning 15 degrees or so with the jack fully extended, but it's easy to push it on up at that point.

I fabed some 1/8" cables attached to the frame on each side to attach to a carabiner on the jack head. It is handy to keep a couple of small bungees accessible to lock the brake levers to keep the bike from rolling on a slope in mud or sand while you are jacking. Funny how there always seems to be mud or sand around where the bike goes down.

You need to keep it where you can get to it from either side with your leg pinned under the bike. If the three feet length is a problem, you can cut it shorter to get your leg out and then rig a splice or extension if needed to stand the bike up.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I was ridding in some tall grass in some trees between two corn fields in Saskatchewan on the Trans-Canada Adventure Trail when I hit a hole hidden in the tall grass. The bike went down and pined my leg. I wasn't hurt, but I couldn't get my leg out. I took the jack off the back of my tail box and jacked up the bike just enough to get free. Then I jacked it up straight and rode on through the trees.

I could have been months before a farmer came by there on a tractor and then he wouldn't have heard me yell.
 

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I went down here near my home, yesterday. I stepped off so wasn't pinned. It was hard, flat ground. I was in sight of the street and a good Samaritan actually drove up and asked if I needed help. He helped me get the bike up. I'd tried lifting the bike a couple of ways, before he got there, with no luck. Even if I could lift it, I have to wonder what the toll on my back/body might be. The best thing to do is get a tool to help...

Your situation was potentially a lot more dire. And it's the kind of potential that was tickling my mind, yesterday. What if? I got my warning. It's up to me to heed it. Thanks again for your design. It is a proven life-saver, you could say.

Even if one could lift his bike (on a good day), isn't pinned under the bike, what if one is hurt in a crash? Say someone breaks a leg. How effective would he be, using brute-force to lift the bike in that state? Not the most likely event, but not completely unlikely, either. Something to consider, if you're riding solo in the boonies. All these types of scenarios are going through my head, after dropping the bike, yesterday.
Alan
 

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Discussion Starter #11
A personal locator beacon (SPOT or InReach) can ease a lot of concern in the back of your mind.
 

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One of my first purchases was a Garmin w/ InReach capability, and registering for an InReach account. But that's a last resort. I got the jack yesterday, cut it off today, and am studying the 'hook' that affixes to the jack-head... Thanks again for the inspiration/design. :smile2:

Alan
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I attached a carabiner to the jack head with a loop of 1/8" cable and a cable clamp. Then I attached 1/8" cables with end loops to the frame on each side and run up near the seat. I connect them with a small bungee across the front of the seat. This just makes it easy to connect the frame cables to the carabiner on the jack without having to fool around connecting to the frame with the bike on it's side.
 

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No doubt that this is a heavy bike, your set-up is genius. Brute force attack is what I needed when I dropped mine at idle.
 
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