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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently my newly installed Lithium battery let me down. Fortunately, I live on a very long and steep driveway, so I was able to bump-start it without any problems, but it got me to thinking. Can one make a sort of jumper cable from the SAE connectors used for trickle charging the bike during the winter? I realize that it isn't meant for that type of load, but if you connected the bikes together for about 10 minutes, it might be enough, I think?
 

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Or install a Positive stud terminal into the 6" long black plastic panel near the fuel tap and an 8 gauge cable to either the input side of the starter relay or the positive battery terminal. Then jumper cables connect to the Positive stud and the nearby LH lower sub-fame bolt for Negative Ground.
Simple, Cheap & Easy.
 

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Cable Gadget Wire Event Electric blue
this is what I did for my battery tender. Connected to the battery and ran the other end out of way but easy to get. Just plug it in and let the battery charge it. Find them at auto zone and Amazon easy. I just call it a battery tender quick discount. Hope this helps someone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
View attachment 36150 this is what I did for my battery tender. Connected to the battery and ran the other end out of way but easy to get. Just plug it in and let the battery charge it. Find them at auto zone and Amazon easy. I just call it a battery tender quick discount. Hope this helps someone.
I have that on all my bikes. Most motorcycles I've seen lately have that. What I was talking about was making a cable that would connect two such equipped motorcycles, if one was low on juice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Or install a Positive stud terminal into the 6" long black plastic panel near the fuel tap and an 8 gauge cable to either the input side of the starter relay or the positive battery terminal. Then jumper cables connect to the Positive stud and the nearby LH lower sub-fame bolt for Negative Ground.
Simple, Cheap & Easy.
Sounds doable, but I was trying to have something on my bike that I would always have with me and that would take up minimal space/weight. I don't know any motorcyclist that carries conventional jumper cable (I'm not saying there aren't some, but I don't know any).
 

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My PO installed an SAE plug that Y's into a powerlet connector down by the starter. He was nice enough to include the powerlet jumper cables when I purchased the bike. They stay in my pannier :)
 

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A BAD battery will not recharge. And if you so much as touch the starter button when connected thru a Tender pig-tail it will fry its fuse instantly! A bigger fuse will cause the pig-tail wires to FRY!
The starter motor may pull 75-100 amps! That is why it needs 8 gauge Cables!
 

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A BAD battery will not recharge. And if you so much as touch the starter button when connected thru a Tender pig-tail it will fry its fuse instantly! A bigger fuse will cause the pig-tail wires to FRY!
The starter motor may pull 75-100 amps! That is why it needs 8 gauge Cables!
Think electric heater element🤣
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
A BAD battery will not recharge. And if you so much as touch the starter button when connected thru a Tender pig-tail it will fry its fuse instantly! A bigger fuse will cause the pig-tail wires to FRY!
The starter motor may pull 75-100 amps! That is why it needs 8 gauge Cables!
Everything you said makes complete sense. But I had a day where I left my ignition switch on and only turned it off at the kill switch, so the headlight stayed on. A half hour later, my battery was just a little too weak to start the bike. I realize that the starter would draw too much juice for the fuse or cable, but if I let it charge for a while from a donor bike (without attempting to start it), I figured that the battery could "come back" enough to start the bike on its own.
 

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Everything you said makes complete sense. But I had a day where I left my ignition switch on and only turned it off at the kill switch, so the headlight stayed on. A half hour later, my battery was just a little too weak to start the bike. I realize that the starter would draw too much juice for the fuse or cable, but if I let it charge for a while from a donor bike (without attempting to start it), I figured that the battery could "come back" enough to start the bike on its own.
I wouldn’t hope that a battery would come back enough to start.
I’d rather carry something that I know will start the bike.
If you’ve got another bike to jump from you also have someone to give you a push to roll start it.
I’d roll it, crank it, and keep getting it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I wouldn’t hope that a battery would come back enough to start.
I’d rather carry something that I know will start the bike.
If you’ve got another bike to jump from you also have someone to give you a push to roll start it.
I’d roll it, crank it, and keep getting it.
That would normally be the logical choice, but I've been in situations where it was difficult or impossible to push-start. That's one of the reasons that I wish there was still a kick-starter on bikes. My first five bikes either were kick-only or also had one in addition to the e-starter.
 

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Everything you said makes complete sense. But I had a day where I left my ignition switch on and only turned it off at the kill switch, so the headlight stayed on. A half hour later, my battery was just a little too weak to start the bike. I realize that the starter would draw too much juice for the fuse or cable, but if I let it charge for a while from a donor bike (without attempting to start it), I figured that the battery could "come back" enough to start the bike on its own.
Yes, this will work, not only on your KLR, but on cars too. Just don't try to start it while connected through that SAE connector, or you will pop the in-line fuse. The principle is to let the discharged battery suck up some charge from a good battery (and preferably a running bike or car), enough to restart the bike. 5 minutes is usually enough charging time in my experience. If that doesn't work, try 10 minutes. If that doesn't work, you'll need a direct battery to battery jump, or push start.
 

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while i haven't had to jump start my bike yet, i can't speak on how easy or hard it would be for connecting, but i bought one of these jumper packs for when i go off roading or camping. its a great jumper to have and works well. its nice that you don't have to string a long cable between vehicles and you're not risking another vehicle's electrical system if something goes wrong. also if you are in a tight spot where you can't get another bike/vehicle next to you, this really shines. the price on this website is pretty decent and the unit it good quality. i'm not trying to be a salesman, but i personally had good luck with the product and the website. there are a couple smaller ones that may fit better in a back pack, but the v-10 is not bad for size. it has a little weight to it, but its nice because it doesn't feel cheap. you may


you should have enough cable to remove the battery cover and slide the battery out enough to hook up the clamps and do the jump start. i'd say while not as convenient, it'd probably be the safer way since you wouldn't have to worry about overloading the battery tender cables. when jump starting, you're pulling a decent amount of amps and those cables are not really built for huge amp loads. i'd be cautious about hooking up larger cables directly to the battery as a DIY battery tender type thing because it could be bad if you ever have it short to the chassis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
while i haven't had to jump start my bike yet, i can't speak on how easy or hard it would be for connecting, but i bought one of these jumper packs for when i go off roading or camping. its a great jumper to have and works well. its nice that you don't have to string a long cable between vehicles and you're not risking another vehicle's electrical system if something goes wrong. also if you are in a tight spot where you can't get another bike/vehicle next to you, this really shines. the price on this website is pretty decent and the unit it good quality. i'm not trying to be a salesman, but i personally had good luck with the product and the website. there are a couple smaller ones that may fit better in a back pack, but the v-10 is not bad for size. it has a little weight to it, but its nice because it doesn't feel cheap. you may


you should have enough cable to remove the battery cover and slide the battery out enough to hook up the clamps and do the jump start. i'd say while not as convenient, it'd probably be the safer way since you wouldn't have to worry about overloading the battery tender cables. when jump starting, you're pulling a decent amount of amps and those cables are not really built for huge amp loads. i'd be cautious about hooking up larger cables directly to the battery as a DIY battery tender type thing because it could be bad if you ever have it short to the chassis.
With the SAE connectors it should be impossible to short out (assuming that they are installed correctly). As I said earlier, I wasn't intending on jump-starting it this way, it was more designed to "recharge" the battery.
I do think that a Lithium jumper box is a good way to go, except that I had previously (about 4 years ago) bought one, and it was incapable of starting a small 4 cylinder car, despite the advertising claiming that it could start a diesel.
 
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