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Discussion Starter #1
Was reminded by Lockjaw's current thread that I was going to try running a higher psi in my front tire.

I'm switching over from my much-beloved Shinko 244's to the Kenda 761's front and rear and they will be the most street-oriented tire I've ever run on a dualsport.

Don't some of you guys run these tires? What psi do you like in yours?
 

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planalp,
I've never ridden those tires. But play with it some, I'll only suggest +2 psi on the front vs rear, works quite well with most skinny front tired bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I opted for 34 on the rear and 36 on the front and will adjust accordingly.

I must say, I wish I would have opted for some more street-oriented tires a long time ago. I stopped riding gnarly dirt trails years ago so really had no reason to run a 50/50 tire for the past few years.

I really like these tires on the pavement and gravel so far and think they'll do fine in the dirt as long as there's no mud.

I'm usually not an mpg nut, but I can't resist doing another mpg check with these tires because I think it will go up from what I used to get running the bigger, softer 244's.
 

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I use Shinko 705's on my 2008 which are probably similar to the Kenda 761's. I've settled on 25psi front and 30psi rear. I get about 12,000 miles out of the rear. The front could go twice that long, but since they are so inexpensive, I always replace both at once.

I've noticed that most people (on most bikes) run much higher pressure than the factory recommended pressures. I'm not sure why. I've always found the factory recommendations fairly close. I did try 35 rear and 30 front once. It was like I was running stage coach wheels! Every bump and undulation in the road was pronounced and disruptive.

Ron :)
 

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Ranger Ron,
Just for curiosity sake, try running your Front tire a couple of PSI stiffer than the Rear tire. Go out on a lonely highway and ride a slalom course back and forth thru the center stripes. Be fairly aggressive with your counter-steering, at least up to your comfort level.

Then tell us which combination has sharper / crisper handling manners, in your opinion. Low front or Higher front?

Also, which tire hits the unexpected big rock first, when riding off highway?
Guess which end gets the most rim dents?
Just my honest opinions and suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've never paid any attention to the recommended tire pressures. I just play around with them until I find what I like. If I have a tire that maxes out at 40 psi, I usually run it pressurized in the low 30's. I carry a pump and can change pressure at will, but rarely do so.

I've never bothered to air my tires way down for offroad riding. I'm just not a a good enough rider that a few psi in my tires is going to make the difference in whether I negotiate a tough piece of ground or not. I definitely don't milk every last bit of traction from tires.

It doesn't seem to me there's any optimum pressure range for everybody. As long as it's not so low you're spinning the tires on the rims or overheating them running at highway speeds and you don't over inflate them to the point they blow up, it's all good.

I am now a proponent of pdwestman's idea of running a little more pressure in the front.
 

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Another vote for PDwest.

Although I go a bit overboard I happen to like 50 up front
and about 40 in the back. They won't blow up I promise.
Due to liability issues on catastrophic tire failure on an m/c
they are manufactured much stronger per sq. inch than a cage
tire. Never had a blowout in 30+ years and I think 115,000
lifetime bike miles. (yes I kept track of each bike n' tallied)

There isn't a problem on or off road and I like the direct feel
n' run hard suspension too. Rear on #5 and 1 inch spacers crammed in the tubes.
I get REAL low in the twisties and hard tires combined with soft knobbies give
killer traction and feedback both.

Just another point of view similar to West with a few more psi's,

Cheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeap
 

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I opted for 34 on the rear and 36 on the front and will adjust accordingly.

Sorry didn't reply earlier but my bike was in the shed under a cover and I was too lazy to go and check the label I made and put in my trunk.

What you chose for pressure is what I ran when I had the 761's on. My rule of thumb for pressures is max. as printed on the sidewall < 10%.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hey, appreciate the feedback, klr4evr. They feel really good to me at these pressures.

Had a momentary moment of panic when I went to check the pressure in the rear tire yesterday and it was something like 25, down from 34 in a day.

I instantly went into panic mode, thinking, "I do not want to mess with this tire again" and then realized I was reading "bar" or "kilopascals" or some weird shit on the Slime tire gauge I bought last year and hate but am too cheap to replace. For some reason, "psi" is the last option.

It will take me a few days of checking tires to remember to make sure it's set on "psi."
 

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I never much thought about running more psi in the front. Just ordered some new Shinko 705's. Was running 30 front and 32 rear with the stock tires.

Always thought the recommended pressures were quite low and maybe targeted more for 50/50 riding on/off road.

I may start out with 32 front and 30 rear and go from there.

I don't know if the 'load' and/or distribution ever makes a difference in tire pressures, me along with side and top cases, standard load of accessories, I would put it at 275-300lb.
 

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After reading all of these posts I tried 35 psi in front tire today and was amazed at the improvement. The front end tracks better and feels more planted in turns. (pavement riding) I haven't been doing any dirt stuff for a while now and have slowly raised tire pressures every year as a result. Currently at 35 psi front and rear.
 
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