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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello!

I have a 2017 Kawasaki KLR 650 and I recently bought this Kenda K270 Dual/Enduro Front Motorcycle Bias Tire - 3.00-21 58C.


Right after I had it installed I noticed a terrible wobbling of the bike on the freeway at speeds of 70 mph and up.

I took it back to the shop and they balanced it again but still wobbles a lot. It does not always do it. I live in the mountains at 5,500 ft but I ride down every day at 800 ft.
It only does it during the hottest hours and at the lowest elevations.

I finally adjusted the tire pressure and noticed that below 25 psi it behaves a little better, but I am still very disappointed by the performance of the tire.
Maybe is meant more for off roads than freeway?
At the shop they checked ball bearings and everything else and they think it is the hot temperatures affecting the tire in some way.

Does anybody have similar experience with these tires? Any advice?
If this does not change I will have to buy a different tiree (back to Dunlop?) and replace it.
I do a lot of mile on freeways....
Thanks for your feedback!
 

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I've ridden a true front wheel, fully bead seated, properly balanced Kenda K270 at 110 mph indicated, downhill with a tail wind with narry a wiggle.

But there is such a thing as a "Bad Tire"!
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quick update:

The wobbling did not improve and actually got worse with the wearing of the tires and the higher temperatures.
I decided to switch to Shinko 705 Dual Sport Tires and will get them installed soon.
After inspecting my front tire I noticed a pattern that is a little weird (see attached pictures) with those square slick parts being at least 1/4 inch shorter than the rest. It may be good for off-road but sucks really bad on freeway at 70+mph especially with high temperatures. I hope this can be of help for anybody on the forum thinking of replacing tires....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Dick:
Here are the answers:
1- I think I had Dunlop D606 on.
2- I did not have any wobble before unless I had a low pressure tire.
3- I use what the manufacturer recommends: 21psi front, and 23psi rear but I have played a lot by under inflating and over inflating both tires with some results but not much. Sometimes it runs fine early morning with nice temps, but gets really bad in the afternoon with temperatures approaching 100F.
I gave up and decided to change tires even if they are not done yet.
I hope the Shinko 705 are good tires. The reviews say they are good.
Thanks!
 

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I hope the tire change does the trick for you. I have TK 70’s on my bike and I get the wobbles in crosswinds. I tried a low mount fender, checking the head bearings, and all the other recommendations on the forum. I ride highway and gravel with the occasional fire road and running 32-34 front and 2 lbs less in the rear has helped.

I’m to the point where it’s boiled down to the suspension. I’m sure I need a heavier spring in the rear as I sag more than recommendations call for even on the highest preload. When I squirrel enough cash away that’s where I’ll start.

best of luck, Dick
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My Bike has only 11,000 miles on it so I would discard a problem with suspensions or bearings (although anything is possible, right?). I am very hopeful that new tires and balance will fix it. It was perfect before I put the Kendras on....
I will post updates after I get new shoes....
 

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acampane,
I would have really liked to have had a conversation with the factory guy that suggested a mear 21 psi in the SKINNY front tire of a 400+ pound bike + rider of a bike capable of nearly 100mph.

My 'go to' tire pressures for asphalt riding is a Minimum of 32 psi in the Skinny Front tire & 30 psi on the Wider rear tire, regardless of brand or type of tire. Always 2 psi higher in the skinny front tire vs the wider rear tire!

You may 'air-down' for dirt or gravel routes, but I seldom ever do so.
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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Acampane: I am currently dealing with the same issue by methodically isolating the problem and fixing it. You should click over to the “2008+ Wrenching and modification questions” forum. Look for “New member with weave and wobble issues” and follow it. I’m several steps ahead of you, and I just received a set of Shinko 705’s which I will put on in the next day or two and report the results. The change in tire pressures, as others have recommended, has made the most difference so far.
 

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I have run that Kenda a few thousand miles and love them. something odd like that does not add up. pull the valve core and air it down then hit it again with air compressor air and let it air down. do this a few times and maybe tube will settle more happily. then put core back in and put in 34 psi and ride. line6
 

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I know the last post was a month or so back, bu up forward I& aft are kenda k270, and I really like ‘em. I run the 3.25 rather than the 3.00”. I get the problem with the knobs, but I was told to keep them at 34psi front & 32 aft. That’s been fixed. They don’t bother me effect wise. The only time I have an issue is when I’m ridin’ on concrete hwy with the grooves in them, then it gives a minor wobble. She just flat out tends to Really gets Them moving across the grooves.
Doc
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Quick Update:
I got Shinko 705 tires and mounted them.
The bike is incredibly smooth now!! I drove it 90+ mph with no shaking and did not even need balancing!
There was definitely something really wrong with the Kenda tires.
I also want to share this: After pinching two tubes I bought this amazing tool (Baja NO PINCH Tire Tool) and it made the job of putting the tire back incredibly easy and fast. I will definitely always use it in the future. Not cheap, but totally worth for me.
One more thing: Does anybody have good advice on how to get a stubborn bead unstuck. I struggled really badly with one and had to drive my car on the side of the tire to get it unstuck!
Thanks everybody and be safe!
 

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The KLR rear rim has the 'Safety Bead retention lip' like a true tubeless rim. So a tubeless Capable tire 'really snaps ON' for safety reasons.
Tube type only tires like the oem Dunlops will almost crawl off the rim before you can get stopped, because of the looser fitting beads of tube type tires.
Some tubeless type tires can be a Real Bugger to beak the beads back down over the 'safety lip'!

A customer was just praising his Motion Pro 'Bead Breaker Tire Irons' today, which allowed him to break the beads & change his own rear tire on his Honda Africa Twin in his garage recently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you pdwestman!
So if you are in the middle of nowhere and you need to fix a flat is there any trick to break the bead besides getting Motion Pro 'Bead Breaker Tire Irons' and try?
 

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Insert the straight tip of your common tire iron in between the rim and the tire bead and Pull Up on the lever. Which forces the bead down about a Thousandth of an inch, at that point.
Work on about a 12-16 inch section of 1st the LH bead about a Hundred times till un-seated and then repeat about a Hundred times on the RH bead until unseated.
If traveling with a friend, I've read that their kickstand foot can operate as a bead breaker, putting the full weight of their bike onto a 1 &1.5 inch contact area.
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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I used an 8” C-clamp to break the bead and hold it down while working th tire irons around the rest of the tire. The Shinkos are a tight fit. Yes, I also pinch-flatted my tube the first time. Some kind of tire lube also helps with removal.
 

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That tool looks awesome. With bead lube getting the tire back on isn't terrible, but getting them off the bead is crazy. I use two spoons and a bead buddy to break the bead. Ensuing nightmares about getting stranded with a flat in the desert is just the cost of doing business.
 
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