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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone! I’m really exited because I just bought my first ever medium sized motorcycle, that happens to be a KLR 1994. (I used to ride a 125cc Suzuki). It is a 20+ year old machine and obviously it looks like it. I want to do kind of a restoration and I was wondering what recommendations can you give me. Like, where to start, what parts to buy that are available, what parts do you recommend changing, etc. Also, any performance mods would be welcomed as well. Any advice on how to do this motorcycle look and ride better would be highly appreciated. Thanks in advance everyone!!!
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My suggestion is, other than the doo, a 685cc kit to freshen up the engine and a set of tires, to take as close to stock as possible. What you have there is a rare piece of motorcycling - legend.

sre
 

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That ones looks real good. I almost bought one years ago. But, picked up a NX 650 instead.

Other than the turn signal, it looks good as is. Hard to tell from the photo, but maybe fork seals/fluid also. It looks like the one you can see has some oil on it.

Oil change, brake fluid flush and don't forget to flush and put in new coolant. Clean the chain and give it some lube. Also, as mentioned, check the age of the tires and replace if needed. That will get you started. Then after some miles, you can see what else it might need.
 

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Welcome and nice bike. Mods will depend on wants, needs, usage, expectations and budget - there are far too many potential mods and improvments you can make to customize/tailor your KLR for your use. the bike clearly needs a signal light, fork service and some fork boots and you should do a full service on any used bike that is "new to you". The only modification I consider essential for every Gen1 is a replacement "doohickey" kit - I recommend the replacement from Eaglemike with the torsion spring. Have fun


Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That is a sweet barbie. What are you thinking it needs right now?
I'm thinking about tires, changing the gauge to a digital one from trail tech, restoring the frame (it has some oxidation on it), and puting a wrap on it to change the color. Any suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My suggestion is, other than the doo, a 685cc kit to freshen up the engine and a set of tires, to take as close to stock as possible. What you have there is a rare piece of motorcycling - legend.

sre
Thanks! that's exactly what I want. Getting it as close to stock as posible.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Welcome and nice bike. Mods will depend on wants, needs, usage, expectations and budget - there are far too many potential mods and improvments you can make to customize/tailor your KLR for your use. the bike clearly needs a signal light, fork service and some fork boots and you should do a full service on any used bike that is "new to you". The only modification I consider essential for every Gen1 is a replacement "doohickey" kit - I recommend the replacement from Eaglemike with the torsion spring. Have fun


Dave
Thanks a lot Dave! This is the first time I hear about a "doohickey" replacement. I will take it into consideration.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That ones looks real good. I almost bought one years ago. But, picked up a NX 650 instead.

Other than the turn signal, it looks good as is. Hard to tell from the photo, but maybe fork seals/fluid also. It looks like the one you can see has some oil on it.

Oil change, brake fluid flush and don't forget to flush and put in new coolant. Clean the chain and give it some lube. Also, as mentioned, check the age of the tires and replace if needed. That will get you started. Then after some miles, you can see what else it might need.
Thanks a lot than! Defently it needs fork seals and oil. But so far, it rides amzing!
 

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Welcome to the forum!

You have an excellent start on a very nice looking KLR. I do hope you keep it close to OEM configuration and don't repaint it black to hide the beautiful colors. :)

I have a '95 version and its almost identical:
 

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my "Doohickey" post:
I have spent significant time reading and researching this issue over the years as have others......my opinion is thus:

- Gen1: failure of the stock lever and/or spring is highly likely.......the people "in the know" guesstimate around 33% though I'd suggest the figure is somewhat mileage dependent with the 33% being around 20,000 miles.....higher mileage = higher percentage of failure.

- Gen2: doohickey lever failure is almost non-existant.......the issues of loose fit on the shaft and loss of spring tension are real. Loss of tension is said to occur around 6,000 miles though some have zero tension from new and some still have tension at 20,000 miles.



So is this all an internet myth? No, it's real enough IMO. There are several reasons that I believe contribute to the lack of even more documented failures:

- A great many people never adjust their counterbalance system. If the adjustment is never attempted, the system doesn't get the huge slack that an attempt with a broken spring would introduce. I always tell new owners NOT to adjust the system without physically checking to see it's intact first.

- Most grenaded doo and spring bits float around harmlessly in the bottom end without causing catastrophic failure. My 2001 was opened up at 15,000 miles to find the typical broken doo (three pces) and spring (two pces). I found all the pces in the bottom end and oil screen and the bike was likely ridden for some time in that condition.

- the "upgrade" in 2008 significantly reduced the likelihood of a broken doo lever.

- a large percentage of bikes die of old age, crashes and neglect long before they can be considered high mileage units.

- many failures are never diagnosed......i.e. bike is "broken" and parted out or otherwise discarded.

- Sometimes other failures (i.e. 2008/2009 low oil level/oil burning) takes out the engine before the counterbalance system has the opportunity to.


At the end of the day, I believe that the stock counterbalance adjustment system is problematic but the vast majority of KLR owners are ignorant of the issue and it doesn't come up on their radar for the aforementioned reasons.

On a Gen1, I believe replacement is critical to longevity. On a Gen2 you could get along fine by just periodically checking the spring to ensure it is intact and has tension. Due to the loose fit on the shaft, the springs are put under significantly increased duty cycles, EM's superior lever with better fitment and the torsion spring design completely eliminate this concern.


A KLR, especially a Gen2 can live for quite awhile without even acknowledging the counterbalance adjuster.....but it's still a weak link that is worth replacing if you want some piece of mind.


2 cents,
 

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[QUOTE} I'm thinking about tires, changing the gauge to a digital one from trail tech, restoring the frame (it has some oxidation on it), and puting a wrap on it to change the color. Any suggestions? [/QUOTE]

I wouldn't change the gauges unless they don't work. When painting the frame, it's easy to mess it up so I'd either just spot paint as necessary or take the entire bike apart - in any case, keeping it the stock silver is best and way easier. from the KLRFAQ; Dupli-Color #WP101 Silver high-performance wheel paint (formerly known as Steel ) is a good match

On the body, there are lots of options....honestly these barbies are getting rare so I'd consider putting the stock stuff in storage and replacing it with aftermarket plastic. Maier makes Gen1 plastic in four colors now; I just ordered a set of black plastic for my 2000 from 3D Cycle Parts......I use an IMS 6.6 gall tank so I don't need shrouds and I also use a Polisport Universal Freeflow front fender, in black of course. If that's too much for the budget, I'd consider trying to get a decent used set and then clean/polish/heatgun and factory effex clear numberplate background.....but that's a bit of work. Last resort would be a rattlecan, but if you go that route, I strongly suggest getting another set of plastic and tank to do it with.

Dave
 

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I'm thinking about tires, changing the gauge to a digital one from trail tech, restoring the frame (it has some oxidation on it), and puting a wrap on it to change the color. Any suggestions?
If you're going to replace the gauges and change the color, perhaps you'd consider selling this one to someone interesting in doing a resto and buying another one in a less rare color?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
my "Doohickey" post:
I have spent significant time reading and researching this issue over the years as have others......my opinion is thus:

- Gen1: failure of the stock lever and/or spring is highly likely.......the people "in the know" guesstimate around 33% though I'd suggest the figure is somewhat mileage dependent with the 33% being around 20,000 miles.....higher mileage = higher percentage of failure.

- Gen2: doohickey lever failure is almost non-existant.......the issues of loose fit on the shaft and loss of spring tension are real. Loss of tension is said to occur around 6,000 miles though some have zero tension from new and some still have tension at 20,000 miles.



So is this all an internet myth? No, it's real enough IMO. There are several reasons that I believe contribute to the lack of even more documented failures:

- A great many people never adjust their counterbalance system. If the adjustment is never attempted, the system doesn't get the huge slack that an attempt with a broken spring would introduce. I always tell new owners NOT to adjust the system without physically checking to see it's intact first.

- Most grenaded doo and spring bits float around harmlessly in the bottom end without causing catastrophic failure. My 2001 was opened up at 15,000 miles to find the typical broken doo (three pces) and spring (two pces). I found all the pces in the bottom end and oil screen and the bike was likely ridden for some time in that condition.

- the "upgrade" in 2008 significantly reduced the likelihood of a broken doo lever.

- a large percentage of bikes die of old age, crashes and neglect long before they can be considered high mileage units.

- many failures are never diagnosed......i.e. bike is "broken" and parted out or otherwise discarded.

- Sometimes other failures (i.e. 2008/2009 low oil level/oil burning) takes out the engine before the counterbalance system has the opportunity to.


At the end of the day, I believe that the stock counterbalance adjustment system is problematic but the vast majority of KLR owners are ignorant of the issue and it doesn't come up on their radar for the aforementioned reasons.

On a Gen1, I believe replacement is critical to longevity. On a Gen2 you could get along fine by just periodically checking the spring to ensure it is intact and has tension. Due to the loose fit on the shaft, the springs are put under significantly increased duty cycles, EM's superior lever with better fitment and the torsion spring design completely eliminate this concern.


A KLR, especially a Gen2 can live for quite awhile without even acknowledging the counterbalance adjuster.....but it's still a weak link that is worth replacing if you want some piece of mind.


2 cents,
Thanks a lot! This was very very helpful since I REALLY care about the longevity of my bike. This will be one of the first things I will do to my bike for sure. Also I've noticed that the temperature needle never gets too high and I'm a little worried about it because there are two options: The bike never gets that hot or the temperature sensor is now working properly. Also the fan never activates, I tested it and I know it works so the other option is that the radiador switch is now working properly. I saw a youtube tutorial on how to test it and I just ordered a multimeter so I could test mine. Apart from that, anyother suggetions?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
If you're going to replace the gauges and change the color, perhaps you'd consider selling this one to someone interesting in doing a resto and buying another one in a less rare color?
I didn't realise it was a rare color! Defenetly I will not change the color then, but I will try to restore the plastic. I'm not too sure about the gauge since this one looks really old and speed needle is not working.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
[QUOTE} I'm thinking about tires, changing the gauge to a digital one from trail tech, restoring the frame (it has some oxidation on it), and puting a wrap on it to change the color. Any suggestions?
I wouldn't change the gauges unless they don't work. When painting the frame, it's easy to mess it up so I'd either just spot paint as necessary or take the entire bike apart - in any case, keeping it the stock silver is best and way easier. from the KLRFAQ; Dupli-Color #WP101 Silver high-performance wheel paint (formerly known as Steel ) is a good match

On the body, there are lots of options....honestly these barbies are getting rare so I'd consider putting the stock stuff in storage and replacing it with aftermarket plastic. Maier makes Gen1 plastic in four colors now; I just ordered a set of black plastic for my 2000 from 3D Cycle Parts......I use an IMS 6.6 gall tank so I don't need shrouds and I also use a Polisport Universal Freeflow front fender, in black of course. If that's too much for the budget, I'd consider trying to get a decent used set and then clean/polish/heatgun and factory effex clear numberplate background.....but that's a bit of work. Last resort would be a rattlecan, but if you go that route, I strongly suggest getting another set of plastic and tank to do it with.

Dave
[/QUOTE]
What is the best method to respote the stock plastic fairings so I can keep the color?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Also I was wondering if I got a good price on it.
I paid 43,000 mexican pesos, which are 1,918.47 dollars.
Did I overpay?
 
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