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I am looking to upgrade my XT225 to the new KLR. I know that the extra power will be great, as the XT really struggles on even a slight incline at 6000 ft. Will the new KLR, with carbs, get me over any and all passes in Colorado?
 

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I haven't ridden the 08's but the 07 and down will, some rejet the carb and adjust it for the altitude.So I would think the 08 would be about the same.
 

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I just took my 08 KLR on its first adventure....a 200 mile run up Highway 88 to Bear River Reservoir, CA via back roads...Highest evelavtion was 6,600 feet...I'm at 50 feet at home.....seemed to have alittle less power, highway more noticeable than off road....Of course I've only ridden a total of 500 miles and it is a DIFFERENT type of ride than my Harley.....I don't think I'll change the carb...maybe the gearing.....The bike never stumbled due to the altitude... All in all agreat time....hope this helps
 

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I am looking to upgrade my XT225 to the new KLR. I know that the extra power will be great, as the XT really struggles on even a slight incline at 6000 ft. Will the new KLR, with carbs, get me over any and all passes in Colorado?
Will the bike be loaded?
Are you heavy or a lightweight?
Will you ride the passes if there are torrential rains or will you wait for clearer skies?

There are a lot of variables.
 

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I live at 5000' and ride up to 8000' with stock carb. No problems.
These things are a little lean anyway so more altitude will cause you to run a little richer. No need to rejet for short rides that high. You may consider it if you do a lot of high speed stuff.
I use the slab just to get to the dirt.

Have fun.
John
 

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I am looking to upgrade my XT225 to the new KLR. I know that the extra power will be great, as the XT really struggles on even a slight incline at 6000 ft. Will the new KLR, with carbs, get me over any and all passes in Colorado?
I'm in Colorado right now, and come here often. I bought my KLR at sea level (and live in Florida). I keep thinking of a jet kit and pipe but for now it is bone stock. The only problem is the idle. I have to increase the idle or it will die. So far it has been over a number of passes at 11,000' and seems happy. I'm sure it would run stronger with a jet kit but for now it does fine. (300lb payload.)
OBTW, I get 50 mpg here, and so does my fuel injected bike. I'm not sure why.
Seems like it should be rich with thinner air, but it doesn't translate that way.
 

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I think the KLR is above average for running stock at high altitude. I sometimes swear it runs better!

I snapped the clutch and pulled a good wheelie on top of Pike's Peak (14110 ft) just to spite my Dad on his struggling XR. He does have a flat slide carb in it and didn't change jetting so that only compounded his elevation issues.

But no, I have been to Colorado at all elevations on about every pass you can name (that's not in Oaray, haven't been down there yet) and it has run great with completely stock setup.
 

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Will you ride the passes if there are torrential rains or will you wait for clearer skies?
.
Forgive me, Im new to the KLR. Havent owned a carbed bike in years. How will the ride be effected if there is rain? It rains alot here am I in for a surprise?
 

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Forgive me, Im new to the KLR. Havent owned a carbed bike in years. How will the ride be effected if there is rain? It rains alot here am I in for a surprise?
No effect when riding in the rain.. I've ridden in absolute downpours and haven't had any issues other than a wet seat and wet feet..:)
 

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I go to colorado every year and ride the off road passes up to 13000 ft and have no problems at all.Rain is no problem however,heated grips come in real handy.
 

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I go to colorado every year and ride the off road passes up to 13000 ft and have no problems at all.Rain is no problem however,heated grips come in real handy.
the klr handles riding up to these passes with ease?

all i hear is lightweight lightweight lightweight in regards to offroading,...

we dont have much offroading in my country but i want to go and ride the pyrennes and alps and balkans...... one of the reasons why i initially bought a klr...... but since been wondering maybe shoulda gone smaller... dr350, klx250 etc etc due to people constantly going on about weight..... and having had to turn the klr with a recovering brokwen arm half way up a muddy hillside.. ok i get that bit.... but surely a klr will go where i point it and keep going with a lil squirt of throttle....
 

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the klr handles riding up to these passes with ease?

Yes, with-out full travel gear and for riders with 5-20 years of experience.

all i hear is lightweight lightweight lightweight in regards to offroading,...

All of the routes in Colorado that are KLR passable are technically roads! Not offroad, in the truest sense of the word. The less-experienced might suggest that those routes are but "twin goat trails".
And I love them.

we dont have much offroading in my country but i want to go and ride the pyrennes and alps and balkans...... one of the reasons why i initially bought a klr...... but since been wondering maybe shoulda gone smaller... dr350, klx250 etc etc due to people constantly going on about weight..... and having had to turn the klr with a recovering brokwen arm half way up a muddy hillside.. ok i get that bit.... but surely a klr will go where i point it and keep going with a lil squirt of throttle....
It all depends on your level of experience and a 36 inch / 910mm actual leg length makes a world of difference with the heavier bikes, like a KLR650 with a full tank of fuel.
 

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Carburetors meter fuel depending on the airflow moving through its body. Typical air pressure at sea level is 14.7psi. When you travel to higher altitudes the outside air pressure is lower, so there is a perceived " lack of airflow" through the carb.

Outside atmosphere is positive pressure . The engine creates vacuum. The positive pressure chases that vacuum, and the carburetor meters fuel accordingly. Although in extreme cases you may feel yourself needing to add additional throttle input, that not to say that the jetting is off. There's just less ambient air pressure available to fill the vacuum, so more throttle opening is required to allow more air in to produce the same combustion/HP that you are accustomed to.

Point is, the carburetor can handle it fine. It self adapts. But there is no cure for high elevation power loss.

I used to do a lot of drag racing, bracket racing, index classes,etc . Consistency was key and we watch barometric pressure and relative elevation gauges....The car would slow down, but the fueling ratios were fine.

$0.02
 

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the klr handles riding up to these passes with ease?...........
we dont have much offroading in my country but i want to go and ride the pyrennes and alps and balkans...... one of the reasons why i initially bought a klr...... but since been wondering maybe shoulda gone smaller... dr350, klx250 etc etc due to people constantly going on about weight..... and having had to turn the klr with a recovering brokwen arm half way up a muddy hillside.. ok i get that bit.... but surely a klr will go where i point it and keep going with a lil squirt of throttle....
The first post in this thread asked about the KLR at high altitudes. I was surprised that no one mentioned the KLR has a "constant velocity" carburetor which automatically adjust the needle jet for the air density at different elevations. I have ridden my KLR from 280 feet below sea level up over 13,000 feet dirt road passes with ease and no manual carburetor adjustments needed.

If the mountain roads you want to ride are real roads that a standard four-wheel drive Jeep or truck could manage, the KLR can manage it also. If they are rough trails with big rocks requiring oversized tires and high clearance Jeeps, you would need long legs and lots of experience even with lighter bikes.
 
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