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I'm planning a trip through the Southwest/South of the good ol' US of A this summer and am somewhat worried about my 06' KLR's capability in the hot conditions I'm sure to encounter.

I plan on riding during the coolest parts of the day but I still want to know how other's bikes have done in the heat, above 100 degrees for example. Does the KLR have any cooling issues I should worry about?

Thanks in advance...
 

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It should be fine unless you are idling a lot on trails or in heavy traffic. I would install the fan bypass switch so you have control of the fan's turn on temp setting. If you see it climbing and you want to flick it on to help the rad cool it a bit you can simply turn the fan on with a toggle switch. You basically use the switch as a second ground source...so bite into the sender wire and the run it into the switch and then to ground. Easy peasy!

I've had it done for years and it has helped when in heavy slow moving traffic even up here in the Great White North!

Hope this helps......some will say it's not worth it, but...to each their own.
 

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I've never heard of a KLR, in proper repair, overheating. Since your bike is getting on 7 years old you might want to do a proper flush and re-fill to make sure it's in good shape.

If it makes you feel more in control, you can install a switch to turn on the fan at will.

I've run mine in rather tough off road conditions out in the desert with the temps a bit over 100 with no issues. Granted, the fan was on quite a bit, but it stayed around the 210 mark.

T
 

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You basically use the switch as a second ground source...so bite into the sender wire and the run it into the switch and then to ground. Easy peasy!
Small detail; grounding the thermal switch lead activates the Generation 1 cooling fan; for Generation 2, a manual-control switch must connect the two contacts of the thermal switch; no ground need apply (grounding the circuit at the thermal switch on Generation 2s would blow the fan fuse)!

Is a manually-controlled fan switch "worth it?" Assuming a functioning thermal switch, the manual switch only provides activation in advance of the thermal switch's automatic activation. In persistent, high-temperature operation, doesn't matter whether the fan was activated manually or automatically; the engine is at the mercy of coolant flow from the water pump, and radiator air flow from motion and/or from the fan. A manual fan switch won't enhance long-term cooling capacity, as far as I can see.

Some find comfort in manual fan activation; not a problem. A market may exist for manually-actuated THERMOSTATS . . . hmmmmm. Might look into that. :)
 

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What year bike are were discussing here with the original poster, I wonder?
Good question, given the differences in electrical wiring between the generations.

Generation 1s have fan relays; Generation 2s don't have no stinkin' fan relays, running full fan current through the thermal switch.

BTW, a manual switch across the thermal switch terminals for a Generation 2 should be rated at 15 amps, consonant with the fan fuse.

Here's what a Generation 2 wiring diagram looks like (from RobTX):

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=klr650+wiring+diagram+images&id=F49C2D210BEABDF55936BB85EF0CA54715846DDF&FORM=IQFRBA#view=detail&id=F49C2D210BEABDF55936BB85EF0CA54715846DDF&selectedIndex=0
 

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It should be fine unless you are idling a lot on trails or in heavy traffic. I would install the fan bypass switch so you have control of the fan's turn on temp setting. If you see it climbing and you want to flick it on to help the rad cool it a bit you can simply turn the fan on with a toggle switch. You basically use the switch as a second ground source...so bite into the sender wire and the run it into the switch and then to ground. Easy peasy!

I've had it done for years and it has helped when in heavy slow moving traffic even up here in the Great White North!

Hope this helps......some will say it's not worth it, but...to each their own.
hey willys put me down for a switch and a tool tube,when its ready let me know and I will come up for the install:desismiley1:
 

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Reread the first post to find out he has an 06....just saying.....
Missed that! My elementary school teachers who checked the, "NEEDS TO READ MORE CAREFULLY" box on my report card are validated.

Generation 1, SPST 10-amp switch to ground thermal switch lead, good to go, if a manually-activated fan capability is desired.
 

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hey willys put me down for a switch and a tool tube,when its ready let me know and I will come up for the install:desismiley1:
Tool tube has been made already and I have a few switches here and some wire for your next visit......let me know when...no problem.
 

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I'm planning a trip through the Southwest/South of the good ol' US of A this summer and am somewhat worried about my 06' KLR's capability in the hot conditions I'm sure to encounter.

I plan on riding during the coolest parts of the day but I still want to know how other's bikes have done in the heat, above 100 degrees for example. Does the KLR have any cooling issues I should worry about?

Thanks in advance...
DV,
FWIW,
I agree with Tom, if your cooling system is in good condition then you shouldn't have any problems. I've got an 08 and I have ridden it for extended periods in temperatures in excess of 40c without any problems. Mind you this is on open roads, might be different in stop go traffic. Biggest problem for me in those temps was keeping myself hydrated and reasonably comfortable with a the ATGATT thing.
Regards,
iddy.
 
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