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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2015 KLR 650 that just turned 500 miles. Besides the initial oil change I'd like some other mods made.

I am in Crystal River, FL. The two nearest Kawasaki dealers are Tampa Bay Powersports and RideNow in Ocala. Anybody got a recommendation of one over the other?

Some background info:

These are the mods I am wanting done.
Carburetor upgrade
Eagle Mike do-hickey spring
Low profile magnetic drain plug
Front shock emulators
Rim locks
Oversize front brake disk?
Side stand switch guard
vatrader Petcock Upgrade ?
rear shock (Cogent Dynamics 'Moab')
CA emissions plumbing removed
Sub Fender removal and license plate move (MAYBE)
New exhaust (Lexx)

The following have already been done:
Rear brake cylinder guard
Moose Racing Headlight Guard*
1" Lowering Links
Moose Shifter
Engine guards (SW Motech)
SW-MOTECH Skid Plate
Adjustable Centerstand
IMS Pro Series Footpegs
Pannier inner bags (pair)
Backrest pad
Solas reflective tape
35L Pelican 1550 Panniers w/rack
35L Pelican 1550 top box w/rack
K9 Fork Brace
Corbin seat (seal seams)
TechSpec Snake Skin The Tank Lock Kit
GPS
shorter side stand
Wolfman Enduro Tank Bag Black
 

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There's a room in your house that has a throne and a large rectangular vessel in it. Somewhere on the wall is a large piece of silver glass. Have a look in there and you'll see your mechanic.

All kidding aside a lot of the things that are on your list are relatively easy to do - even for someone who doesn't feel mechanically inclined. There are lots of how-to articles and videos available to walk you through it. Plus this forum is full of knowledgeable folk willing to lend a virtual hand.

Welcome to the forum.
 

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Agree on the complexity/simplicity of the target modifications.

Your bike, but . . . unless you're riding competitive hare scrambles or moto-cross, I'd recommend you forget the rim locks. A KLR isn't likely to slip the casings on the rims, unless maybe you're running at 5 psi, IMHO. My perception/assessment/recommendation only; YMMV!
 

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Cogent Dynamics would probably recommend a custom shortened shock absorber rather than the use of lowering links, but using the links with a Cogent would allow the bike to be returned to normal height 'cheaply' many years down the road at sale or trade-in time.

A franchised dealership of what-ever brand may not care to take the risk of EPA Non-compliance (punishable by up to $10,000 per violation) for removing the evaporative emissions plumbing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Rim locks are off the list. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Excellent point about the EPA and fines. Was wishful thinking on my part.

So .... anybody got a recommendation on which dealership.

As an FYI, I am full timing in an RV and the place we are staying does not allow working on vehicles. That is why I am wanting to take it to a dealership instead of DIY.
 

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Agree on the complexity/simplicity of the target modifications.

Your bike, but . . . unless you're riding competitive hare scrambles or moto-cross, I'd recommend you forget the rim locks. A KLR isn't likely to slip the casings on the rims, unless maybe you're running at 5 psi, IMHO. My perception/assessment/recommendation only; YMMV!
*****WARNING******
The KLR will ABSOLUTELY slip the tire on the rim at pressures of 15psi and below, pulling the valve stem out of the tube resulting in a rapid loss of air pressure and possible loss of vehicle control with resultant injury or death to the rider and anyone nearer than 5 miles from the crash. Ask me how I KNOW this and I may hunt up the pictures.
Rim locks are a good idea and work well to prevent tire/rim slippage but if added will require the tire/rim assembly to be balanced for on road use.
If you don't want to add beadlocks, DON"T run tire pressures lower than 15psi. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!!!!
Best Regards....justjeff

PS....Here is the link to my write up in 2012 when I crashed because of running too low of tire pressure without beadlocks. It was the closest to being killed on a bike that I have been. I got lucky.
http://www.klrforum.com/never-let-your-guard-down/13771-crashed-my-bike-way-home-tonight.html
jj
 

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Your bike, but...well...I just can't imagine taking any bike of mine to any dealership for any service whatsoever. I'd suggest lookkng instead for a good, reputable independent tech who specializes in KLRs. Dealerships are fine for sales, and warranty work, but otherwise, I'd look elsewhere...or rent a shop bay and do it myself.
 

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*****WARNING******
The KLR will ABSOLUTELY slip the tire on the rim at pressures of 15psi and below, pulling the valve stem out of the tube resulting in a rapid loss of air pressure and possible loss of vehicle control with resultant injury or death to the rider and anyone nearer than 5 miles from the crash.
Certainly, slipping the tire on the rim is POSSIBLE, but . . . the likelihood remains a function of tire pressure and usage, IMHO.

Assuming 15 psi minimum tire pressure, and a typical KLR riding profile, slipping the tire appears a remote possibility, to me.

My impression only, but . . . how many KLR riders install rim locks?

A rim lock does no harm; KLRista's choice; rim drilling required, re-balancing necessary after installation.

Full disclosure: I've pulled a valve stem from a front tire on my Generation 1 KLR650; Continental Trail Attack, probably from under-inflation (sound rider maintenance requires frequent pressure checks); did not leave rim and made it 20 miles on pavement to a shop. A little bumpy, but . . . only at low speeds.

Had a front flat on my KTM690 (NOT from a pulled valve stem); Vee Rubber 401; went 100 miles on pavement to repair--took it easy on the curves, but . . . could hardly tell the difference from an inflated tire. In practice, a "run flat" tire, but . . . the bike weighs only 300 pounds.

Caveat: Do NOT run on flat tires, unless tires are specifically designed to run flat. Emergency expedient only. Best, safest practice: Repair and reinflate flat tires immediately.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Really good input on which mods and why. I would love to find an independent KLR experienced tech.

So ... back to the original question: anybody got any recommendations for an experienced KLR guru in the Ocala - Tampa area?
 

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So ... back to the original question: anybody got any recommendations for an experienced KLR guru in the Ocala - Tampa area?
In order to answer your question, one would have to reside in that area, own a KLR, have taken it to one of two of those dealers, and still active on the forum. I've only seen a handful residing in Fl, including myself, and all of them seem to work on their own rides. Your best bet honestly, is to find a riding buddy or friend that has a place where you can work on your ride. Or take your chances at one of the two. Should you choose a dealership, start with a simple and inexpensive job and then see how they treat you, and whether your pleased with the job.
 

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In my many miles of long distance rides I have had several repair needs that I couldn't handle in a motel parking lot with my road kit of tools. I have found that the smaller the shop the more pleased I was with the service. Many in many small shops the owner is also the head mechanic. You can talk with the owner and tell him what you want and get a feel for the place. One time the shop was loaded with work, so the owner loaned me a drain pan, sold me some oil and let me do the change in his shop. Another time the owner loaned me tools and shop space to install a helicoil.

My point is; Google "motorcycle repair in your area" and check out some of the smaller independent shops near by. Tell them a rotor puller and a rotor holder will be needed for the doohickey. I made a rotor holder by heating and bending an $8.00 32mm wrench and ordered the puller form Eagle Mike.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
GoMotor - Thank you. Exactly what I was looking for. There are several small shops in the area.



Much thanks to all for the input.
 
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