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So the oil drain bolt was over tightened, and this is the result after removing the bolt for the first time owning the bike to change the oil...:crying:. (REFER TO PICS). There are numerous threads on this very topic that can be found on KLRforum.com, but I still think that there are alternatives to: 1. welding the entire drain hole closed, and 2. JB Weld; though, I am not entirely sure what would work best and hold up for coming years. I want to keep this bike, and would really appreciate some of your opinions based on the damage described and shown in the pictures.



So, I just purchased my first KLR a few months back. It was an excellent deal, through a very close friend who was moving from the area. I never did my research on these bikes before I purchased this one, so I had no idea what to expect, other than quite a strong reputation. I knew that this bike (2004), was very well maintained throughout it's life. Before changing the oil, the bike never leaked oil, and was consuming oil according to specification. While pulling the bolt, I realized that it took a little more force than I was expecting, and a piece of the housing cracked off as you can see in the pictures. It's not horrible; there are still a good amount of threads where the bolt can thread back in, and it does thread back in without problems. There are also no hairline cracks around this area, and the case is otherwise clean.

However, there is the issue with the gap that is left when the bolt is re-threaded and the fact that it now has a slow leak from that spot. What are your suggestions? Have you encountered the same or similar problems? What were your steps in fixing the problem. I would really like to have it fixed for as cheap as possible. Really looking forward to hearing your responses and hoping to hear back soon! Merry Christmas, and a Happy New Year to everyone!
 

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I cannot figure out how to attach pictures! Maybe someone can help me?
I think you must attain 15 (or is it 10?) posts to put pictures on the forum.

I'm sending you my e-mail address by PM; you can send the files to me and I will post the images for you.

FAIR WARNING: I'm an advocate for the, "OVERSIZE DRAIN PLUG" solution, whenever possible (doesn't sound like it is in your case).
 

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I cannot figure out how to attach pictures! Maybe someone can help me?
Forum rules require a 15 post count before pictures can be linked. Anti-spam feature. A Mod will usually fix that if the post requires it.

Welcome to the forum.
 

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Most common reason that cases crack is lack of proper oil plug bolt washer. Do you have one? Are you using the stock plug or an aftermarket magnetic? I wonder if wrapping your drain plug with plumbers tape and or Teflon thread lube would stop your leaking.?.
@pdwestman will be along soon and I’m sure he will offer you some good advice.
 

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I'd FIRST try an oversize oil drain plug; will cost you $ 3.00 or so, and if it doesn't seal, you're still no worse off. Then, explore other options--drill-and-tap; insert; motorboat transom expandable drain plug; even . . . last ditch, WELD.
 

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So the oil drain bolt was over tightened, and this is the result after removing the bolt for the first time owning the bike to change the oil...:crying:. (REFER TO PICS). There are numerous threads on this very topic that can be found on KLRforum.com, but I still think that there are alternatives to: 1. welding the entire drain hole closed, and 2. JB Weld; though, I am not entirely sure what would work best and hold up for coming years. I want to keep this bike, and would really appreciate some of your opinions based on the damage described and shown in the pictures.



So, I just purchased my first KLR a few months back. It was an excellent deal, through a very close friend who was moving from the area. I never did my research on these bikes before I purchased this one, so I had no idea what to expect, other than quite a strong reputation. I knew that this bike (2004), was very well maintained throughout it's life. Before changing the oil, the bike never leaked oil, and was consuming oil according to specification. While pulling the bolt, I realized that it took a little more force than I was expecting, and a piece of the housing cracked off as you can see in the pictures. It's not horrible; there are still a good amount of threads where the bolt can thread back in, and it does thread back in without problems. There are also no hairline cracks around this area, and the case is otherwise clean.

However, there is the issue with the gap that is left when the bolt is re-threaded and the fact that it now has a slow leak from that spot. What are your suggestions? Have you encountered the same or similar problems? What were your steps in fixing the problem. I would really like to have it fixed for as cheap as possible. Really looking forward to hearing your responses and hoping to hear back soon! Merry Christmas, and a Happy New Year to everyone!
If the oil drain plug was not leaking before you put a wrench on it, I'll suggest that you turned it the wrong way on your first attempt. Which started stripping the threads.
Then you probably dropped the gasket in the oil pan. Then the ill cut threads on an after market magnetic drain plug Fractured the boss when you reinstalled the plug, without the gasket.

Have you read my post #6 in this tread? JB Weld is your only cheap option IMHO & you need to have the patience to do it Yourself.
https://www.klrforum.com/1987-2007-...ng-cracked-piece-fell-off-klr-650-2005-a.html


I think you must attain 15 (or is it 10?) posts to put pictures on the forum.

I'm sending you my e-mail address by PM; you can send the files to me and I will post the images for you.

FAIR WARNING: I'm an advocate for the, "OVERSIZE DRAIN PLUG" solution, whenever possible (doesn't sound like it is in your case).
I'd FIRST try an oversize oil drain plug; will cost you $ 3.00 or so, and if it doesn't seal, you're still no worse off. Then, explore other options--drill-and-tap; insert; motorboat transom expandable drain plug; even . . . last ditch, WELD.
Damocles, An oversized drain plug can not help until the gasket surface which is broken away is repaired in some manner.
 

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@klr4evr,

Thanks for fixing the link.

We went out with the extended family for dinner. I had a Rob Roy, dry, with an olive before dinner. Then I had a Rusty Nail during dinner. After dinner I got a bit bored and tried to fix that link. On my phone.

Then dessert came...
 

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You mean to tell us that the TLW did not tell you to "put that phone down while at the dinner table."?
 

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You mean to tell us that the TLW did not tell you to "put that phone down while at the dinner table."?
No, she was busy talking about girly stuff.
 

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Would you trust that suggestion on your personal bike?
Under emergency field expedient circumstances, with no better solution available, YES!

Just as I would REVERSE a worn-toothed sprocket in the field, with no replacement available ('til I could obtain a new one, of course)!

"Adapt, Improvise, and Overcome," as the US Marine Corps (and Clint Eastwood, in "Heartbreak Ridge") says! (I think MacGyver had a similar credo.)

:)
 

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When I was 11 yrs old I did the same thing to my Honda 50 mini bike. After my dad beat the shit out of me for doing it he sent me down to the hardware store for a 1/2" rubber expansion plug. He pushed it in the hole, tightened the screw and it never leaked ever again. I rode that bike like that for years until I had more than outgrown it, Sold it to a neighbor kid who then continued to ride it that way for a # of years after that. Go on Amazon and search for a rubber expansion plug. I know from experience it will work and very cheaply too. Obviously, welding up the hole and machining a new seal surface would be optimal, but that would cost a major pile of cash..
 
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Damocles, In addition to the adapt and overcome, you forgot the " Lead follow or get the fu#* out of the way! We got a war to fight!"

Besides, the drain isn't even under any pressure. I have seen them work for years on end as a field expedient repair. I've even seen them go for a couple years in a 350 Chevy block as a quick repair for a freeze plug when a dummy let his engine freeze cause he was too cheap to add anti-freeze to a leaky radiator and thought water was OK in the winter.. ( no that time it wasn't me)
 
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