Kawasaki KLR Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Although I'm new to the world of the KLR650, I am not completely new to the world of motorcycles. In the past, bikes I have owned came with tool kits that were simply not up to par. The question I have for the fine folks on this forum is... Is the tool kit that came with my KLR up to the challenge? Have you found the tools to be adequate for roadside repairs? Are there tools you have added to your kit that you won't ride without? I'm looking for any suggestions, advice, tips, or just some good conversation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,598 Posts
Not exactly Snap-On quality, but . . . the OEM tools remain, "better than nothing at all!"

Pre-'08's had "Phillips-head" machine screws holding plastic side panels onto the frame (removal necessary for seat removal, etc.). Understand "Generation 2" bike side panel fasteners are hex-head bolts; not sure whether the on-board OEM tool kit has a deep socket or extension to reach those; just a thought . . .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,513 Posts
I go a little overboard as noted below. Even if you don't go as crazy as I did, you might want to scan through this list for any ideas. A lot of my kit focuses on being able to repair roadside flats.

http://www.klrforum.com/showthread.php?t=11152

If you don't mind carrying more tools, the best thing to do is just sit down some afternoon and start tinkering. Figure out what fasteners and parts you might have to remove in case something goes wrong and put them in your kit.

Every time you work on the KLR, work out of your kit: that way you'll find out if you don't have something in there you need to add, plus a lot of other folks brought up some good ideas.

My theory is if you've got room to carry it, it's better to have it and not need it than to really need it and not have it.

LoneRider brings up a good point about the deepwell sockets for the side panels on a GenII: definitely necessary. You could also just replace them with some Phillips head screws from the hardware store.

For what it's worth, I also leave my seat bolts out so I don't have to remove them every time I pull the seat off. I think somebody on here said they found out the hard way and at a bad time that there's no wrench in the OEM tool kit that fits the seat bolts.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
432 Posts
The OEM tool kit is sufficient for minor repairs and does include the proper tools to remove the side panels and seat. That being said, I kept the spark plug wrench and tossed the rest! I made a tool tube for the front of the bike and it holds most everything. I do have a separate bag containing tubes (front & rear), tire spoons and all the other little things that make tire changing easier.

Tire Bag


Tool Tube


Tool Tube Contents


I have added a couple things since the picture was taken. Now includes a ball pein hammer with the ball part removed so it fits in the tool tube.

Also have a "Spares" bag with the following:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,598 Posts
The OEM tool kit is sufficient for minor repairs and does include the proper tools to remove the side panels and seat.
Good!

Just curious, what on-board OEM toolkit tool is used for the Generation 2 side panel fasteners?

-----------------

As I recall, the Generation 1 toolkit omitted one axle-hex size . . . no biggie!
 

·
Lifetime Member
Joined
·
2,484 Posts
I'm glad this thread got started, I've never looked in the factory toolkit, but I always assumed it would have the 8mm socket tool to remove the side covers. I think I'll be adding one in case I ever have to boost the bike. Lol, kind of an oversight on Kawi's part I would say...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
This information is great and appreciated.

Sardog1, the pics are most helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Sardog...can you share the info on that tool tube? Size of tube, length? I like it much better that the one I have on my bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Great info, Think i'm going to get on board and put something together for a tool tube.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
432 Posts
Sardog...can you share the info on that tool tube? Size of tube, length? I like it much better that the one I have on my bike.
The ABS parts were sourced from Lowes on-line. The black ABS is stronger than the white PVC so it'll stand up better to the abuse of off-roading.

Qty. 1 - 4" X 14.25" ABS Pipe (Item#:256096 | Model#:APCL40002 $10.95)
Qty. 2 - 4" ABS Caps (Item#:22815 | Model#:02980L $6.94 ea)
Qty. 1 - 4" Pressure test plug (red end with the wing nut)
Qty. 2 - 5" to 6" Stainless steel hose clamps
Qty. 2 - 4-1/8" to 5" Stainless steel hose clamps
ABS cement

The finished product is pretty straight forward. The reason I used two end caps was to make it sit even against the highway peg bar. If I'd only used one cap, it would sit cocked. One cap was modified by taking a 4" hole saw and drilling the end out followed by using a flush-cut router bit to make it flush with the inside wall of the cap (ABS routes very nicely BTW!). Since the inside of the caps have a 1/2" raised lip towards the inside of the cap, the extra material acts as protection for the bolt and wing nut on the pressure test plug. Overall finished length is 16".

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
432 Posts
Now I have something to do when it gets too cold to ride.
I feel your pain. It's 15° F (9°C) out and my bike is hibernating for the season of snow and salt.

Doing the Continental Divide Ride this summer so I have allot to plan and keep me occupied this winter.

Stay warm.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
432 Posts
I'm glad this thread got started, I've never looked in the factory toolkit, but I always assumed it would have the 8mm socket tool to remove the side covers. I think I'll be adding one in case I ever have to boost the bike. Lol, kind of an oversight on Kawi's part I would say...
Certainly an oversight on their part.

I have added a fused charging connector (~$6.00) to the battery (see left side of battery box) for hooking up the trickle charger or to run my air compressor to air up the tires.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
I made a tool tube like Sardog. Whenever I work on the bike, I use only the tools in this kit so I always have everything I need in the kit.


This is what I have in it now. I just roll everything up in a towell and shove it in the tube.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,513 Posts
Kind of in line with this thread, I've been humping trying to get my projects done and the KLR out on the road since the weather's been nice. Right now, I've got a massive pile of mixed-up tools all over the top of my workbench.

Since it's time to re-pack all my tools and repair stuff back on the KLR, I'm going to get some colored vinyl electrical tape (probably yellow or orange) and put a strip around every tool in my KLR kit.

I figure this will make it easier to keep track of tools if used roadside and since I sometimes have to raid the KLR kit to work on something else, it will help me ensure the tool gets back in the KLR kit when I'm done with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Hi all

I have found this very helpful, I am planning on riding across Australia and I have been struggling with tool list. Is there any additional gear that people might add.

Cheers

Moose
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
In an effort to minimise disassembly time and tools used to access the battery and fuses, I do not bolt the seat - in several dirt laydowns and one paved street laydown, the seat never budged. It is kept tight between gas tank plastic 'thingy' and the front of the rear rack.
similarly, I converted all fuses from glass Buss type (getting harder to find, and very fragile!) to the plastic tab type, with wires extended - they hang below the side plastic, and can be stuffed up inside, and pulled down when needed to check them. My 12V power socket is mounted on the outside of the now empty side-stand lockout box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,636 Posts
What I have in my tool tube can break down the engine and most of the bike to where I can easily repair all minor and most major problems. I can get it down to the tranny engine wise and all but the swing arm off and steering head bearings out so to speak. I have done a few tune up and general maintenance by using just what is in the tool tube to make sure I can if I need to. Sure it takes 10 times longer, but it can be done.
One thing about the above picture of tools. I have combined the two larger openended wrenchs needed to remove the rear wheel with the tire irons by grinding and forming the spoon of the tire irons from the open end of each of these large wrenches. It is more than likely the open end will never get used so it just made sence. Now you can buy those beautiful alluminium combination wrenches that do the same thing....but the wrench is soft compared to the steel wrenches and can't be used as a light hammer. I also carry a volt meter digital and a trouble light both small versions of their larger normal sized brothers in my tool box from Harbor frieght, they work in a pinch and that is all that matters. Wrapping the tools with either some bright tape or painting them is a good idea....thanks, will be painting mine all yellow...I lost a piece of my pliers yesterday because it magically molded itself into a blade of grass!!! AUGH!
I also use the sleeve of an old leather jacket as the tool bag soaked in oil to help protect and make extracting the tools out of the tube. I didn't do this to the first tool set and when I wanted them they were all rusted solid!!!! That was a major piss off!!

I also use as small as humanly possible all tools that will allow me to do the same job as what I normally would use in my garage. I use shorty wrenches and just clamp two together to get leverage. Same with ratchets, one 1/4" ratchet with multiple adapters. 1 set of good small visegrips also.....:13:
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top