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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I followed some old links to see the dyno graphs at the KLRChris web site, but I got a message that the domain was for sale. I understand no one here has heard from him in awhile, now it looks permanent. Does anyone know what happened? And did any of you copy the info from his site before it went into the Big Bit Bucket?
 

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Don't know of any archiving; a riding partner rode by the Texas shop location some time ago, reporting the business in seemingly moribund condition, although some insisted, "It ain't so!" Maybe, it was, "so."
 

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Well, I followed some old links to see the dyno graphs at the KLRChris web site, but I got a message that the domain was for sale. I understand no one here has heard from him in awhile, now it looks permanent. Does anyone know what happened? And did any of you copy the info from his site before it went into the Big Bit Bucket?

I noticed that as well, unfortunately. He had some great info; dyno tests, airflow tests, etc. that I always used to reference. I didn't save any of it (I'm sure I copied and pasted bits here and there)....too bad.


Dave
 

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Well Pete, you've inspired me to search and save this little tidbit but it's all I could find. :-(

As far as carb upgrades go, from KLRChris' site and dyno testing:
The KLR650’s 40mm KeiHin CV carburetor is very reliable and is more than sufficient to cater to most of the the KLR’s performance requirements. The carburetor by itself can support 327 CFM. It is the restrictiveness of air box that prevents full performance support.

The KLR in standard or in mild modified form does not benefit with performance carburetors such as the 40 mm Mikuni TM40-6 smooth bore or the KeiHin FCR. It is true that these carburetors can support a higher flow rate but since the the KLR cylinder head can only support 327 the higher flow performance carbs will have no additional advantage over the 40 mm CV carb.

Some feel that the accelerator pumps on theses carburetors will increase throttle response. We feel that the 40 mm CV carburetor with supporting modifications and correctly setup will be just as responsive.
 

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No reference easily accessible, but . . . in an e-mail message, KLRChris shared with me his experience, advancing the exhaust camshaft one sprocket tooth: LOWER horsepower than with OEM cam timing, in ALL dyno runs.

I quote KLRChris; cam-advancing TRUE BELIEVERS, don't shoot the MESSENGER! :D
 

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I don't doubt Chris' results but I've also seen Mike and Mike's dyno results (Cowlishaw and Coe) that show a different result. I suspect that the difference is due to changes in the cam designs over the years - I know Gen1 and Gen2 exh. cams are different, but I don't recall if there are also differences withing the Gen2 run.

Based on feedback and anecdotal evidence, I was never convinced the MC mod was useful on my Gen1's. ...then again I was also skeptical that the adjustable cam gears that Chris sold was a worthwhile item on a KLR either given the price and modest gains.

2 cents,

Dave
 

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Good points. I think miniscule horsepower difference readings lie within the accuracy precision, and repeatability error budgets of dynamometers.
 

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I think he has simply lost interest and is moving on. His two KLRs are up for sale; $6700 for the pair. I'd jump on that if he was anywhere near me or I was anywhere near Houston.
 
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As I understood a couple of years ago in telephone conversation, he was going to Retire and move back home to the UK, if I recall correctly.
I wish I could have afforded to purchase a pair of his adjustable camshaft sprockets, when he was making them. :(
They were not very expensive after 'core charge' refund or 1st sending cores to be altered.

Degreeing camshafts to crankshaft timing is truely the secret to proper performance from ANY camshaft, regardless of efficient porting!
Plus or Minus .002" on cylinder base or top deck or cylinder head gasket surfaces (on over-head cam engines), or 1-2 degrees of crankshaft woodruff key groove or slot, or camshaft sprocket dowel pin hole, is all it takes to make 2 similar engines run / perform quite differently.
Most people simply do not understand THAT!

And those compounded tiny variables are extremely hard for a factory to get 'perfect', everytime during mass production.

I now wish I had copied or learned how to store his Entire KLR site!
 

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I've built a few race engines and understand the concept well enough, I just don't think there is much on the table there......

I also wish I copied and stored a bunch of stuff from his site; even a few screenshots would have been useful, oh well.

Dave
 

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The only piece I ever saved was the airbox mods page. I saved the webpage's HTML and I have a .pdf.

Other than that I have a couple of charts relating to valve timing; they're in the valve timing articles.

Automotive tire Event Auto part Wood Bumper
 

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Tom,
Could you tell us your seat of the pants experience of power or driveability or powerband curvature after a couple years use with the KLRChris Adjustable Camshaft Sprockets in your bike?
 

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The changes that I made did not have a noticeable effect on horsepower or torque maximum numbers. At least nothing that I could really notice.

The real change was moving the torque and power peaks a bit higher up in RPM. That made a rather dramatic change in driveability. Rather than running 70mph at an RPM that was near the horsepower peak, the engine was running at an RPM below the peak. This made for a much better roll-on at speed for passing. The motor seemed a bit smoother, too. Engine braking is still very good. The timing changes were small against the blueprint specs, but the intake was pretty far off so it wound up being a significant change in intake timing.

I'd also say that 0-60 acceleration was quite improved as the motor would pull harder further up in the RPM range.

But, really, max HP was unchanged so top speed was unaffected. So long as the top speed is at least 80mph I'm satisfied. CHP starts ticketing at 82-83mph on I5.

Of course, I have since changed the final drive ratios considerably to reduce the RPM at cruising speeds and I need to re-think the valve timing. Having the roll-on power at 80-85mph rather than 70mph is not especially useful. ;^) That's the advantage to the adjustable cams - you can tune the valve timing to accommodate changes outside the engine.

I have to go back to my virtual engine and plug in the changes and see which direction to go in. Could very well be that blueprinting the original specs will be the way to go.
 
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Through a bit of sorcery and by reciting incantations that I don't understand but read in a book, I have been able to download much of the KLRChris website. What I have are javascripts, style sheets, and html files. I also have just a few images. It's all not enough to rebuild a website file that you could open in Chrome, but it doesn't matter because I'm not smart enough to do that anyway. I have an archive that "...To run it, you need Apache or NGINX with PHP 5.6+ and the pdo_sqlite extension enabled..." and I don't know what any of that shit is. I'm like a rhesus monkey with a pocket calculator. And it's an RPN calculator.

I can open the html files and could build those out to a .pdf file if anyone is interested in a certain topic. Here's a list of the topics I think I have:

(sic)
60 HP EFI KLR 650
Engine

KLR650 Engine Calculations and Specs
Adjustable Cam Gear
KLR650 Airbox Mod for performance gains
KLR650 Small Port Head a Reliable Power Mod
KLR650 MC Mod for power increase?
Projects
KLR650 Fuel Injection Project
Cam position sensor for the KLR 650 EFI Project
KLR650 Rotor preparation for Fuel Injection Project
KLR650 Throttle Body
Porting the KLR650 cylinder head
KLR650 fuel injected engine
How To
Degree KLR650 cams the correct way to maximize your riding stile
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
So you were one of the real nerds in high school that had an HP 11C? That explains a lot of things.
😁

but more seriously, thanks for ferreting out those files. I’d be interested in the “How to degree cams,” the topics on porting and small port heads, and airbox mods. I read them online a year ago, and recall that therewas a lot of good test information in them. The stuff about EFI has been obviated by the Gen3 bike with factory EFI.
 

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Ummm, the Bowmar Brain came out when I was in the middle of high school. The 11C came out when I was in my early career stages, but I was using a Casio programmable. TLW was big on HP and has always used one, but I never really got the RPN thing.

The airbox mod stuff is attached to post #11. I will try to get on the other stuff but understand that I wasn't able to get too many pictures so they will be lacking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I was a TI guy. Never understood the rationale for the RPN thing either.

Losing the pictures and graphs is a real loss to the community. Too bad. But thanks for what you were able to salvage.
 

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I had a bit of a hand in Raytheon's acquisition of TI's missile business after the sale. For a while, we shared a headquarters building on the campus in Dallas and there was free passage between the businesses within that building. TI had a really neat museum of its commercial products that I visited often.

I, too, became a long-term TI user; still am. Good calculators that were readily available. The Casio was an interesting piece for 1982. It spoke Basic. I could make it do all kinds of stuff, the programming of which was a great alternative to doing real work.
 
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