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Discussion Starter #1
I apologize for posting new and probably stupid sounding questions but

1) What kind of oil do you put on your chain?
2) I just got the bike brand new...put 50 miles on it.....it got wet and some dirt in it.
3) What do I do to it to keep it lubricated properly and what kind/weight oil do you use?

I havent owned a bike in like 15 years. Just want to keep it maintained properly. Its definitely a winner!
 

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This is from KLR650FAQ:
What should I use to lube my chain?
Many people use fancy aftermarket lubes; if you do, make sure it's safe for O-ring chains. WD-40 has also been used to great success, and it cleans the chain while it lubes it. Finally, the manual recommends 90W gear oil, which is cheap and also works well, although it will fling a lot of dirt on the bike.

I wash my chain with kerosene and a soft bristled brush, you don't want to use any harsh brushes as they can damage the o-rings. Once the chain is clean I take a rag and pour some chain saw bar oil onto the rag and then run the chain thru the rag to oil the outter links, wipe off any excess so it won't drip and fling. I will then run my bike a few miles to heat up the chain, come back home and spray on chain wax that I get from the dealer. The heat will allow the wax to flow down into the o rings and coat them. Let it sit and cool. No mess no fuss. I also made me a nice lil field jack out of a cheap walking cane I got from walmart to facilitate lifting the rear tire up, so I can rotate the chain around. Spray or put your oil on the top section of the lower chain so that gravity pulls it thru.


Internet image found




This jack will also allow you to lift the front tire up off the ground by placing it somewhere under the front of your skidplate, I use my crashbar as a mounting point for the front.
 

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The jack is seriously cool. Gotta luv simple stuff that works.
Yea, it's almost as convenient as a centerstand, works almost as well as a centerstand, stores almost as well as a centerstand. Why not just get centerstand? Centerstands don't get absent mindedly left behind. They don't weigh much, mine is 6.5 lbs. I've never had one hang up on a log or a rock. A centerstand seems like a much better tool than a precarious home-made stick.
 

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Good points, but I don't think DX or anyone else was thinking of using it in lieu of a centerstand. KLRs go places a center stand might not work and most centerstands won't allow you to get the tires completely clear without some help (at least mine won"t).

The obvious solution is to have both.
 

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Ermm centerstands tend to drag over items if going off road, but more importantly, being a former KLR owner, that means I am CHEAP, my cheap broomstick cost me all of @ $10 as opposed to over $100 for more weight and something I would rarely use :).


Yea, it's almost as convenient as a centerstand, works almost as well as a centerstand, stores almost as well as a centerstand. Why not just get centerstand? Centerstands don't get absent mindedly left behind. They don't weigh much, mine is 6.5 lbs. I've never had one hang up on a log or a rock. A centerstand seems like a much better tool than a precarious home-made stick.
 

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Ermm centerstands tend to drag over items if going off road, but more importantly, being a former KLR owner, that means I am CHEAP, my cheap broomstick cost me all of @ $10 as opposed to over $100 for more weight and something I would rarely use :).
The centerstand weighs 6.5 lbs. My centerstand does not hang as low as the kickstand bracket and is level with the bash plate. It does not drag over anything and it does give added protection to the motor. Most people who don't like centerstands don't like them because they can't figure out the technique for getting the bike up on them.

If you paid $6 dollars for a broomstick you've been had and that bike is going to fall over on you while changing a flat, if you do your own. At best you'll look real silly there under the bike, at worst you'll need stitches or a cast.
 
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