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Discussion Starter #1
We have been having a debate around our place about where do you draw the line between dualsport and trail/dirt. Dualsporting to most seems to be secondary roads such as gravel and one lane paved roads. I personally like unimproved roads or good trails/singletrack.I think any ole dirt road or primitive road falls into this catagory.But as the (sport) grows I hear alot of people talking about dualsporting as just traveling and camping.Now many of you have seen my post on riding and where I ride,and I consider that dual sporting.Kay on the other hand calls some of that trail riding.Dunno,how about your opinion.Where should we draw the line for definition.Gravel/maintained roads? Include unimproved roads? Or anything other than single track.Not that it makes any differance in the long run.It all will boil down to what you want to ride.Some people I ride with we look for the least traveled path or worst road we can find.Others just want to travel gravel,and then only when dry.It is,as a deciding factor riding within your ability.I always try to improve my ability by riding the rough stuff and,to me,that helps make you a better rider.Not everyone likes to get dirty.I myself do not like mud,but deal with it.Learning to ride in mud takes some practice and prepares you for anything you may run into,thus,imho,making you a better rider.My favorite riding here in the east are the unimproved/abandoned county roads.We are fortunate to still have tons of em.So,after this little ramble,what's your opinion of dualsporting? Where should we draw the line.
 

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Any combination of the above + some pavement.

In my opinion, If you are not traveling on at least a few surfaces that require a tag on the ride then it is not Dualsporting.
 

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This may be totally off the subject, but I think that this is exactly what makes the KLR shine. We each have our own definition of what dual sport riding is and the KLR lets each of us achieve that point of fun and room to improve ability if it is so desired. I can't physically do the rough stuff, I am pretty much limited to gravel, single lane black top and some unimproved dirt roads. That to me is dualsporting. Some of you guys can ride them bikes like they are 200 pound 125's on single track lanes and I have the greatest respect for those of you that can do that, and that style of riding is also dualsporting for you. I don't know that you can definitivley break it down to a specific definition because the boundries seem to only be limited by the riders.
 

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Here is a quote from a buddy, which too me defines dual-sporting best:

He rides to where the road ends... Then he speeds off into whatever is in front of him...
 

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I have been "Dual sporting" since I started riding in the 60s & didn't know it.
I prefer the dirt but need a plate to get there so I get a "Dual sport" rather than a "dirt" bike or a "street/road" bike.
The term is new to me but the concept and practice is older than I am. I think that somewhere along the way someone gave it a name that stuck.
My first "new" ride was a 1967 Yamaha DT-1 (250 2 stroke - I was only 220 lbs then). Went everywhere with it.
I do my share of trails around here but with the KLR geared down I don't like to slab long distance so I truck it if I have to travel over 50 miles or so.

John
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have been "Dual sporting" since I started riding in the 60s & didn't know it.


John
That's kinda what I've been doing too_Only since the 70s thou.:)


Joern,glad to hear everything is ok with you and Tom.Coulda been much worse!


I like to think dualsporting is an adventure up and beyound the normal plane of riding.I would think that as long as the individual riding is adding alittle excitment to his ride,your having an adventure.It really doesn't matter if you can throw them around in the dirt or not,just as long as you get out there and ride.I believe the more expierience you have the safer you will be.Lets ride!!!!
 

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I think the definition is clear because I don't use my preferences to define it.

The most basic Dualsport definition would be on-road/off-road. It really isn't any more difficult then that. There has never been any defining level of on-road/off-road use to equate to whether or not you are dualsporting.

Adventure riding is essentially dualsporting for longer distances which typically means multi-day trips. Not really any more difficult here either.

Once you start getting into personal definitions, this is where common sense seems to get thrown out the window. Extremists want to extend definitions simply because they were able to accomplish something. For instance, a KLR owner who adds $4,000 worth of farkles so he can ride 10,000 miles during one trip doesn't make the KLR an adventure bike, it makes HIS KLR an adventure bike. The KLR is a dualsport bike that can be made in to an adventure bike. Also, the KLR owner who adds $3,000 worth of farkles so he can hang with dirtbikes on knarly singletrack does not make the KLR a dirtbike, that makes HIS KLR a dirtbike. Neither of these extremes are considered dualsporting just because a few people manage to do it on what used to be a dualsport bike, but now is something completely different.

Dualsporting, in the broad sense, means you take off from home, travel a few hundred miles, ride some forest roads whether maintained or not, get through some singletrack as necessary, bust through a few stream crossings as needed, pop back on the paved roads and head back home. That's dualsporting! Do several days of this away from home... that's adventure riding.

What makes the KLR so awesome is it' ability to adapt to many different forms of riding. Stock, it can do adventure style riding as well as some dirtbiking. But it's still not either one... it's still a dualsport unless you modify it to be something else permanantly.
 

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I'll add my vote to Dual sport riding being anything that requires on and off road riding. But Off road means something the family car wouldn't make it down. We have several gravel farm roads around here, I do not consider them off-road since cars use them daily. But the same is true for on-road riding . Riding on road means a posted speed limit, stop signs and gas stations. So riding around the park on a dirt bike isn't dual sporting either, even if cars are on the trails.
Just my $.02
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Dualsporting, in the broad sense, means you take off from home, travel a few hundred miles, ride some forest roads whether maintained or not, get through some singletrack as necessary, bust through a few stream crossings as needed, pop back on the paved roads and head back home. That's dualsporting! Do several days of this away from home... that's adventure riding.

quote]

Well said.:)
 

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Dualsporting, in the broad sense, means you take off from home, travel a few hundred miles, ride some forest roads whether maintained or not, get through some singletrack as necessary, bust through a few stream crossings as needed, pop back on the paved roads and head back home. That's dualsporting! Do several days of this away from home... that's adventure riding.
I agree with this also :8:
 

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One man's DS is another's Enduro type ride. In rural Arkansas, you need a plate to get from one cool area to another. We just did a tough DS that was 60 miles of single/two track, 10 miles of dirt road, and less than 2 miles of pavement. I could have taken my KLR on it, but the KTM was a better bike for that ride.

My buddy Jim Devereaux who led us rode A senior in GNCCs for a few years. He had a crash which killed him. Died two or three times. They got him back on the medflight and at the hospital. His wife made him quit racing. Now he just does DS at the same speed he used to race at and on the hardest stuff he can find, and goes for distance too, and we try to keep up!

There is absolutely NO way to define DS narrowly. I enjoy cruising dirt road and pavement all day, or riding cross country through Arkansas' toughest mountains all day. Both types include off road/dirt road/pavement. Both require a headlight/taillight/license. Both are fun. Both are DS. They are world's apart. The only thing in common is they're both done on a bike.

Even adventure riding can encompass all three aspects. I just did a ride with www.advrider.com, (adventure rider), where we did two days of riding in all kinds of terrain. We rode through towns, highway, tourist sites, two track, single track, even a semi-race area where they hold competitive events. Some of us camped out, others did hotels. The trail leader was on a plated KTM 380 exc. We had DRZs, an XRL, a Husky TE 250, don't even remember what all else. I could have made it all on my KLR 650. In most places it would have better than my KTM. In some equal. In a very few, it would have sucked, but done the job!

How do you define a ride like that?
 

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One man's DS is another's Enduro type ride.
I don't think 60 miles comes close to qualifying as an enduro type ride. Now, if you mean tough hills and difficult terrain, that's just tough off-roading. Enduro riding is a style of riding that was coined from enduro racing where rider and motorcycle endurance is tested on long distance courses. It's been dubbed as a style of riding that is fast paced and the rider typically seeks out more challenging terrain, but isn't defined by what type of motorcyle a person is on. Even so, it's irrelevant when defining a dualsport ride. Just because you ride enduro style, you are still on a dualsport ride if you've intermixed off-road with on-road.

There is absolutely NO way to define DS narrowly.
You did define it in your third paragraph. The level or difficulty of the terrain along with speed is irrelevant. You legally combined off-roading with on-roading and thus you have dualsporting. It really is that simple. If you only hit the roads, then you did a road trip not a dualsport trip. If you trailered and only hit the trails, then you went trailriding/offroading not dualsporting.

Even adventure riding can encompass all three aspects.
Adventure riding is dualsporting for longer distances and typically ends up multi-day. Sure, you can ride enduro style during an Adventure ride, but that doesn't make the trip an Enduro. I don't think anyone is saying you have to ride a certain style in order to call it dualsporting. Dualsporting is not a style of riding, but enduro is a style.

If you told me you did an enduro ride, I would assume you did at least a couple hundred miles of fast paced off-road riding. Would not assume any road mileage and would not assume you were on a dualsport bike.

If you told me you did an enduro style dualsport ride, then I would assume you took off from home or a meeting place and did some good road mileage and when you hit the off-road parts you did some fast paced riding through some tough terrain. Otherwise, if it's just tough offroad terrain and normal riding mixed with some onroad, it's just another dualsport ride like any other.

This is similar to the discussion about what defines a dualsport bike. People would say they can take their goldwings down some interesting forest roads. Well, that's fine and they are dualsporting with the goldwing, but that doesn't make the goldwing a dualsport bike. Same applies here, you can ride enduro style, but that doesn't make the ride an Enduro.
 

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Dual-Sporting =

Goose hunting with a .50 cal Barrett off the back of a KLR going 80 mph through a swamp full of tree-huggers and bird-watchers and singing "I'm a Yankee Doodle Dandy" at a Redneck wedding.

Now THAT'S a dual sport!

:21a:
 
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