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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Not sure what you guys thing about this, but for me it's the details sometimes that can make the difference. I'm a strong advocate when it comes to ergonomics and comfort when it comes to motorcycles. I bring this up thinking that maybe not everyone thinks about such things that often and could use a little reminder every now and then.

In regards to your clutch and brake levers it's like real estate location, location, location, right. For me anyway, I prefer both levers positioned downwards as possible. You see I would rather NOT have to rock my wrists down, or back which ever you prefer, in order to lift my fingers to reach a lever. Waste of valuable time in my book. I would rather just lift my finger slightly up then glide them across the lever then drop 'em in place. I do realize moving levers like this on some motors is not practical due to the proximity to other functions such as brake reservoirs etc. on handlebars. However, if you're able to situate your levers in a fashion that suit your riding style a little better all the more reason to visit the subject?

Told a woman YT motorvlogger she should move her levers down for comfort and she just didn't believe me. Hey, you are what you eat and I'll leave it at that.

Just food for thought because I know details like this really don't rank high on the list of things to address on a motorcycle but you would be surprised on what small details can do for your comfort and fatigue levels.

As low as reasonably possible. Yes, I know this is a sport bike but it works for ALL motorcycles trust me.
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I hate to see/ride bikes with the handlebars pushed so far forward that the tips have a riders wrists Twisted Inwards.
Might work OK if one rides standing, ALL the time, which most riders don't.
It is Uncomfortable for me in a simple 5 mile ride to warm/stir the engine oil before changing.

One should be able to find a Happy Compromise between sitting & standing (on a KLR). Or replace the bars.
 

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Not sure what you guys thing about this, but for me it's the details sometimes that can make the difference. I'm a strong advocate when it comes to ergonomics and comfort when it comes to motorcycles. I bring this up thinking that maybe not everyone thinks about such things that often and could use a little reminder every now and then.

In regards to your clutch and brake levers it's like real estate location, location, location, right. For me anyway, I prefer both levers positioned downwards as possible. You see I would rather NOT have to rock my wrists down, or back which ever you prefer, in order to lift my fingers to reach a lever. Waste of valuable time in my book. I would rather just lift my finger slightly up then glide them across the lever then drop 'em in place. I do realize moving levers like this on some motors is not practical due to the proximity to other functions such brake reservoirs etc. on handlebars. However, if you're able to situate your levers in a fashion that suite your riding style a little better all the more reason to visit the subject?

Told a woman YT motorvlogger she should move her levers down for comfort and she just didn't believe me. Hey, you are what you eat and I'll leave it at that.

Just food for thought because I know details like this really don't rank high on the list of things to address on a motorcycle but you would be surprised on what small details can do for your comfort and fatigue levels.

As low as reasonably possible. Yes, I know this is a sport bike but it works for ALL motorcycles trust me.
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Spot-on, makes a world of difference! They must not teach that stuff at these $$$adventure riding classes.... :unsure:
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Spot-on, makes a world of difference! They must not teach that stuff at these $$$adventure riding classes.... :unsure:
I've watched motorcycle training courses on YouTube telling you how to setup you bike. Not a single one has EVER mentioned anything about adjusting your shifter or a brake pedal let alone a brake or clutch lever. Look, sometimes it only takes the movement of 1/4" movement up or down to make a HUGE difference. Individuals just don't realize what the body can or is willing to adjust to to make situations better. It can make a difference between avoiding a disaster or being the focus of that disaster. As mentioned not everyone thinks about the smallest of details. Maybe it's my type "A" personality, but if my type A should rub off on someone that much better for them if it works 😎👍
 

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When I took the local motorcycle safety course, I had to ask for a screwdriver so I could adjust the levers on their TW200. They were so far up that I was having to tilt my wrists up uncomfortably far to get over them.

I have mine adjusted far enough down so that I can easily reach over them without twisting my wrists. I'd probably rotate them a bit more if I were doing a bunch of stand-up riding.
 

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Funny because some folks swear that those "riding lessons" are gospel. 🤣 This is the type of thing that separates the "men" from the "boys". 😘
 
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It's a compromise for mixed standing/sitting. Bar risers will play a role in how much downward angle as well as handle bar rotation. It's in the details. I have a seriously bent handle bar (Always seem to go down on the right side) so when I replace this winter, getting the right bend will take some research.
 
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