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I bought a 1993 KLR-650 9 months ago and have put a hundred miles or so of solo fire roads behind me here in Southern California. I skipped the last 25 years riding a bike at my wife's request but put 60,000 miles on a 500cc street bike in college.

I'm interested in doing the Topaz 600 promoted at dualsportwest.com but am trying to first educate myself about the trail repairs I need to know how to do first.

Can anyone recommend a list of repairs to teach myself and/or a book, workshop or DVD that educates someone on how to do these repairs?

Also can anyone recommend a riding club to join in the 951 area code?

Thanks for the help.

:desismiley1:
 

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Learn to change\ repair a tube maybe change a chain link. Meh it's a KLR. It won't break! LoL. I had to do the tube in the woods once. That's about it other then minor things a zip tie and some wire couldn't fix.



'Life's Journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways,totally worn out, shouting, 'Holy shit .... What a Ride!
Cheers, Nick
 

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Learning to fix flats is a good idea; you might carry an electric compressor (and a way to hook it up) or bicycle pump, a spare tube (front size, can be stuffed into the rear in an emergency), and a patch kit (should you puncture the tube with the tire spoons you'll carry); a little vial of dish soap helps lubricate the tire bead on re-installation.

Here's a useful video on motorcycle tire-changing:

http://www.mxguy.com/motorcycle-maintenance/the-best-how-to-change-motorcycle-tire-video_05-31-2008/

Here's a $ 10 (Target) compressor:



PAY ATTENTION to how the tire hub components go together, which spacers, speedometer mechanism, etc., goes where; a print of the hub fiches might be a good idea to carry on-board.

A Clymer service manual might be handy; look it over and scan-and-print a page or two to carry (e.g., electrical diagram; also available on the 'Net).

Carry spare fuses; learn where they are so you can change 'em (substituing a 15-amp fuse for the 10-amp OEM headlight fuse might be a good idea; little thing tends to blow when HIGH/LOW beams inadvertently engage simultaneously).

For trail survival, I'd recommend handguards (to protect clutch and brake levers; spare levers on board might be a good idea, also), nerf bars (to protect radiator, tank, and plastics), and a proper bash plate (i.e., aluminum, replacing the stock plastic skid plate).

There's no limit to the mods you might perform, and the accessories you might add; I've tried to distill things to essentials.

Start out with the bike in good shape, preventive maintenance (e.g., oil-and-filter changes, air cleaner cleaned and lubricated, etc.) performed, and you'll be fine, armed with the preparations mentioned.

(Some will insist upon upgrading your doohickey (if it hasn't been done); from Bayesian probability, on a bike as old as yours, I'd bet you survive without this modification, although it's sound maintenance/insurance.)

Regardless, get out and ride that KLR; your insurance (perhaps through your AMA membership) will give you a tow if you need it!
 
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