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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
You can read all the reviews you want, but I prefer suggestions from those I know are actual users. I am looking for advice on two pieces of gear I intend to buy soon to pack along on rides:

-Tubeless tire repair kit. Always carried an inflator in the past as I also sometimes varied tire pressures, but am thinking about just going with some CO2 cartridges. Is this a bad idea?

-Some kind of lithium/ion/whatever battery jumper pack.

Oh and for what it's worth, I'm thinking about dropping some serious coin on a high-quality helmet for the first time in my riding career, not because my noggin is worth it, but to try to further reduce noise. By any chance, has anybody ever used a Shoei Neotech2 or a Schuberth C3? Both seem to get high marks but the Schuberth is substantially less costly than the Shoei.

Any opinions/suggestions would be most welcomed.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Disregard the CO2 idea. I realize that, knowing my luck, I would somehow discharge several cylinders without the gas even getting into the tire, so I'd probably carry enough spare cylinders to equal the size of an inflator. In the past, I used a cheap Slime inflator held together with duct tape after several drops. Tom, I remembered and found your post on the Cycle Pump and I think I'll go with one of those.

Would still appreciate recommendations for a repair kit, tho.
 

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I have the NeoTec 2, I really like it, mostly because it is one of the few helmets that seem to fit my weird shaped head :p

All day rides are no issue, modular is convenient at stops, good ventilation, visor and internal sun visor are great.

But worth the cost? i guess that is the question only you can answer.
 

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By all means, consider a lithium/ion jumpstart battery!

My little one (from Cycle Gear) has started multiple KLR650s (including my own!), a V-6 Ford Taurus . . . has charged mobile phone and digital camera, as required.

Bigger bike? Might need a bigger jumpstart battery pack. They're available in various amp-hour and cold-cranking amps ratings, and . . . TOO MUCH jumpstart juice isn't nearly so bleak a predicament as, TOO LITTLE! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the recommendations, guys. Damocles, if I may ask, what particular battery did you choose? Thanks.
 

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Thanks for the recommendations, guys. Damocles, if I may ask, what particular battery did you choose? Thanks.
This one, POD X1, from Cycle Gear; now on sale for $ 69.99:

https://www.cyclegear.com/accessories/pod-x1-backup-battery

If this link doesn't work, Google "Cycle Gear" and look for, "POD X1 backup battery."

Here's another link; can't get one to "stick" on the website:

https://www.cyclegear.com/search?_utf8=✓&query=POD+X1+Backup+Battery&commit=Search

I give up! Can't post a link that leads directly to the product at issue. If you have a Cycle Gear store anywhere near you, they've probably got 'em in stock; or . . . maybe you can "SEARCH" for one on the Cycle Gear website.
 

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I use a slime red gummy worm kit and slime air compressor from Wal Mart that I carry on my Gold Wing. Have used it a few times with great results. A lot less cost than a fancy "motorcycle kit" and does the same thing. If you want this for a KLR, then you need a kit with tube patches, not gummy worms.

Make sure you know the shape of your head before spending big bucks on a helmet. I have a long oval and can only use Bell or Arai helmets. Shoei helmets cause pain after a short time on the front of my head.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I use a slime red gummy worm kit and slime air compressor from Wal Mart that I carry on my Gold Wing. Have used it a few times with great results. A lot less cost than a fancy "motorcycle kit" and does the same thing. If you want this for a KLR, then you need a kit with tube patches, not gummy worms.

Make sure you know the shape of your head before spending big bucks on a helmet. I have a long oval and can only use Bell or Arai helmets. Shoei helmets cause pain after a short time on the front of my head.
Can't really find a definitive answer on the "gummy worms vs. plug: which is best?" question: perhaps carry both depending on the size of the hole.
 

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I use a slime red gummy worm kit and slime air compressor from Wal Mart that I carry on my Gold Wing. Have used it a few times with great results. A lot less cost than a fancy "motorcycle kit" and does the same thing. If you want this for a KLR, then you need a kit with tube patches, not gummy worms.

Make sure you know the shape of your head before spending big bucks on a helmet. I have a long oval and can only use Bell or Arai helmets. Shoei helmets cause pain after a short time on the front of my head.
1. I think planalp has, "graduated," from KLRs! :)

2. My head's, "long oval," too! I find the Arai Signet (this model's structure is long oval; not all Arais are) most, well, understanding and comfortable for my own gourd. The, "Pinlock" anti-condensation treatment of the face shield, in my experience, is worthwhile.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
1. I think planalp has, "graduated," from KLRs! :)
The, "Pinlock" anti-condensation treatment of the face shield, in my experience, is worthwhile.
Definitely want to give the Pinlock feature a try: looks like any helmets I'm interested in either come with the Pinlock visor or will readily accept it.
 

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Batteries are an interesting topic. They are a maintenance item, but the maintenance is limited to the fluid check every 3,750 miles. The thorough testing of a battery’s effectiveness doesn’t come up in the Service Manual until it actually fails! (Chapter 16-18). Isn't the underlying concept of maintenance the prevention of failure?

Other maintenance items, like spark plugs and fuel lines and a laundry list of rubber pars, have a replacement spec. You don’t wait for those to fail and then try and figure out why your bike stranded you in the middle on a remote forest road or mountain top with no cell service. Rather, you do the maintenance. But again, there’s no replacement spec for the battery…and we know that batteries do not last forever. They are going to fail.

To me, the thought of letting a battery that is going to fail, fail is just silly. I live in a place where the environment wreaks havoc on batteries, diminishing their lives. In this environment, my response, in addition to routine maintenance, is to replace batteries no matter what their condition, every 2 years for my motorcycles and 3 years for my autos and grounds equipment (like I have a golf cart, side by side, garden tractors, electric gates, generators). I think that 3 years is probably the right period with a routine maintenance, but I use an abundance of caution on the motorcycles because I do, in fact, find myself from time to time in places that would be a problem if the battery failed.

So, given the relatively weak support that it appears that we get from the powersport manufactures on our battery maintenance, it would seem that we have a choice of preventing a failure or preparing for a failure.

I have never carried a “portable” jump device on my motorcycles in travels all over North America. Rather, I follow my replacement cycle and I have four other items that support my battery maintenance between. They are (1) a combo battery charger/tester, (2) a good digital multi-meter, (3) a gallon of distilled water and (4) a quart of battery acid. That's just me though. YMMV.
 

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So, given the relatively weak support that it appears that we get from the powersport manufactures on our battery maintenance, it would seem that we have a choice of preventing a failure or preparing for a failure.

I have never carried a “portable” jump device on my motorcycles in travels all over North America. Rather, I follow my replacement cycle and I have four other items that support my battery maintenance between. They are (1) a combo battery charger/tester, (2) a good digital multi-meter, (3) a gallon of distilled water and (4) a quart of battery acid. That's just me though. YMMV.
Good points, Bill10!

Yet, besides some of us less conscientious in battery preventive maintenance, an ACCIDENTAL battery discharge might occur; e.g., forgetting to turn off ignition or accessory discharging a battery, or . . . depleting a battery from cranking a dead engine, a circumstance from an electrically-unrelated problem.

Then, there's the possibility of extending Good Samaritan assistance to other motorcyclists, or even motorists, deadlined trailside. The computer/gps/camera charging feature sometimes comes in handy.

Again, your points are good and worthy of respect; I choose the option of, "preparing for a failure," a failure perhaps a function of my own negligence and/or incompetence.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I will freely admit, besides occasionally checking the dash to make sure I'm still getting 14+ volts and checking the terminals every once in awhile, I pay no more attention to my motorcycle battery than I do the one in my car. I don't even know if my current battery is serviceable at all. I generally buy a new one every 3 years for the hell of it, but a new battery doesn't necessarily mean a "good" battery.

Given the size/weight/usefulness of one of these new "Terminator Fuel Cell"-type jumper batteries, if nothing else I'll carry it "just because it makes me feel better."

I had the same battery in my '03 Tacoma for 7 years. First one was in it for 6 years before it died.
 

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A voltmeter is a useful item to keep an eye on the charging system; the voltage thrown off by the alternator. Could be wrong, but I don't think it gives feedback on battery health though. Interested in the thoughts of others on this.

Another thing about batteries that I've always understood is that a fully-charged battery is a healthy battery and will last longer. I found a video on Rocky Mountain ATV on motorcycle battery maintenance that emphasizes this point and recommends trickle chargers, something I don't use for the motorcycles. I suppose I assume I ride enough to keep a battery full, but I need to (and am going to) rethink that.

 

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Helmets

Don't kid yourself. Your helmet is the most important piece of your gear, so don't skimp here. Get the best you can afford. And then some.

I went from 30+ years of full face to the Multi Tech and now the Neo Tech.

With the Neo Tech, I was worried that the sun visor drop-down-thingy would hit my nose, but that's not the case. Modulars (good modulars) typically weigh a little more than a full face, but that's something I've gotten used to.

I love the modulars; pull up at a border crossing, stopped at a traffic light, or just when you need to refresh, it's really nice to have the option to catch a face full of fresh air. I'd never go back to anything else.

I read too many iffy things about the Schuberth's, despite a friend selling those at his shop. I may have put one on my head, but I love the quality of the Shoei.

And, I just recently discovered how good the pinlock system is. (duh)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
A voltmeter is a useful item to keep an eye on the charging system; the voltage thrown off by the alternator. Could be wrong, but I don't think it gives feedback on battery health though. Interested in the thoughts of others on this.

Another thing about batteries that I've always understood is that a fully-charged battery is a healthy battery and will last longer. I found a video on Rocky Mountain ATV on motorcycle battery maintenance that emphasizes this point and recommends trickle chargers, something I don't use for the motorcycles. I suppose I assume I ride enough to keep a battery full, but I need to (and am going to) rethink that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siyR4l3eVlo
In the past I always used a Battery Tender in the off-season but in order to use one now I'd have to remove the battery and bring it up to my apartment and so far I've been unwilling to do so. Longest it's sat this Winter is about 3 weeks at a time so I've been lucky there. I would use a tender again if it was feasible for me.
 
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