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Which is better? 1. Drain the radiator and put new water/coolant? 2. Top it off with water/coolant with a different brand?
 

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If ya dunno when the coolant was last changed, then just change it. It only takes about a quart, so no biggie. I Use the orange Dex Cool GM 5-year stuff. The orange Dex Cool type is all compatible so you don’t need to be concerned about topping off with a different brand.
 

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If low to the point of needing to add you should ask why is it low? Mine hasn't moved off the full line in 3 yrs. As mentioned if you do not know when the last time it has been changed just drain it and refill with fresh. I use Prestone premixed @ $12 gallon. No need to pay Kawasaki for their coolant as long as you use good coolant made to protect aluminum.
 

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Definitely go with a long life coolant. From my diesel engine technician days: Green regular coolant
should be replaced every two years, long life coolant should be replaced every five years.
Antifreeze contains corrosion inhibitors and over time they are consumed. Once the corrosion inhibitors
are gone corrosion can start in the cooling system.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you guys for all the inputs I appreciate it. I just want to do what is right for my KLR as the way you keep your KLRs in good conditions.
 

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BURP - to make sure it's full? Will do that. Thanks
No.

Burping is a process to remove air pockets in the cooling system plumbing, because . . . air pockets may obstruct coolant circulation.

How to burp? Remove radiator cap and start engine. Run engine until coolant temperature rises to the point thermostat opens, observable by watching circulation flow at radiator filling nozzle. Allow engine to circulate coolant while idling for several minutes, expelling trapped air through coolant filling nozzle; shut engine down, top off coolant (in radiator, and fill to "full" zone of reservoir), restore radiator cap, and ride on.

This posted, I don't doubt thousands of KLR owners have drained their coolant, re-filled, and NEVER had any problem with air pockets, and have never burped their bikes. Good for them! I appreciate the, YMMV phenomenon. Yet . . . trapped air can interfere with circulation, and . . . air displaces coolant, diminishing engine cooling capacity.

Personal experience: KLR250; coolant drained and re-filled by dealership on regular maintenance schedule, had the DICKENS of a cooling problem (even installed a redundant manual fan switch in hope of addressing the problem, without effect); all solved by burping the radiator.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
No.

Burping is a process to remove air pockets in the cooling system plumbing, because . . . air pockets may obstruct coolant circulation.

How to burp? Remove radiator cap and start engine. Run engine until coolant temperature rises to the point thermostat opens, observable by watching circulation flow at radiator filling nozzle. Allow engine to circulate coolant while idling for several minutes, expelling trapped air through coolant filling nozzle; shut engine down, top off coolant (in radiator, and fill to "full" zone of reservoir), restore radiator cap, and ride on.

This posted, I don't doubt thousands of KLR owners have drained their coolant, re-filled, and NEVER had any problem with air pockets, and have never burped their bikes. Good for them! I appreciate the, YMMV phenomenon. Yet . . . trapped air can interfere with circulation, and . . . air displaces coolant, diminishing engine cooling capacity.

Personal experience: KLR250; coolant drained and re-filled by dealership on regular maintenance schedule, had the DICKENS of a cooling problem (even installed a redundant manual fan switch in hope of addressing the problem, without effect); all solved by burping the radiator.
Thank you for the additional information. Now I know what to do.
 

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Thank you for the additional information. Now I know what to do.
Have you confirmed that the lower nipple on the reservoir is open? So heated & cooled coolant can pass between the radiator & the reservoir.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Have you confirmed that the lower nipple on the reservoir is open? So heated & cooled coolant can pass between the radiator & the reservoir.
Yes, hose is clear. Opened the radiator cap, still with OEM green coolant and will replace soon with orange coolant.
28146
28147
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Read an old post 2 days ago regarding the coolant reservoir at mid-level seems to be 'NORMAL' (engine not running/ cold). Does it mean that I don't need to fill it up all the way to the upper level? And by the way, here are coolants on sale at O'Reilly. I also bought a distilled water to refill my battery, 10w40 engine oil for my foam filter and gear oil for my chain.
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Personally, I'd use the less expensive Prestone or other brands of Light Green "all makes, all models, all years".

The coolant reservoir doesn't Need to be full, just Never allowed to be totally Empty. Saves a pound & a half of weight. What ever. I fill 'em up.
Double check the radiator level after a couple minute run time, they usually burp an air bubble.

10W40 is fine for use on your original OEM foam air filter (& in the engine), but I prefer straight grade SAE40 for a little less weepage (from the air filter). Easier to clean than the sticky stuff.
If you ever switch over to a Coarser foam filter like a Uni-Filter, you should use stickier foam filter oil like Uni or Bel-Ray.
They stay in the coarse foam better.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Personally, I'd use the less expensive Prestone or other brands of Light Green "all makes, all models, all years".

The coolant reservoir doesn't Need to be full, just Never allowed to be totally Empty. Saves a pound & a half of weight. What ever. I fill 'em up.
Double check the radiator level after a couple minute run time, they usually burp an air bubble.

10W40 is fine for use on your original OEM foam air filter (& in the engine), but I prefer straight grade SAE40 for a little less weepage (from the air filter). Easier to clean than the sticky stuff.
If you ever switch over to a Coarser foam filter like a Uni-Filter, you should use stickier foam filter oil like Uni or Bel-Ray.
They stay in the coarse foam better.
Got it. I will look for that less expensive prestone. Thanks again 👍
 

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I will look for that less expensive prestone.
Was the UN-Mixed Concentrate Prestone "All Vehicles, Makes, Models & Years" also on sale? You've already got the Distilled water to mix with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Was the UN-Mixed Concentrate Prestone "All Vehicles, Makes, Models & Years" also on sale? You've already got the Distilled water to mix with it.
Not on sale, maybe that's the original selling price. Yes, I bought a gallon of distilled water in a grocery market.
 

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Mark,
I just Re-read this from the "Recommended Reading" down below, Radiator
I hope that we coached the OP thru her cooling system issue & that she is still riding her bike.

Wouldn't hurt to give it a reading. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Mark,
I just Re-read this from the "Recommended Reading" down below, Radiator
I hope that we coached the OP thru her cooling system issue & that she is still riding her bike.

Wouldn't hurt to give it a reading. ;)
Thanks for the link. Very practical and informative, Damocles shared how important burping is @ #8. I experienced that many years ago when my car almost hit the red temperature mark, I filled the radiator as soon as possible (while engine is running) until it's full and I noticed it becomes empty sucking the fluid down so I kept filling it up until it doesn't get empty anymore and no bubbles.
 

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Antifreeze is cheap enough that I would rather get the SAME antifreeze I use in my other vehicles so I don’t have 2 or 3 different bottles taking up space on my shelf. If you use orange in your cars, use that. If you use green stuff in your cars, then use that.

Your level in the overflow reservoir should be about the middle when cold. It needs to allow some room for overflow from the engine when hot. That’s why the marks on the shroud on Gen2 bikes are in the middle.
 

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And don’t use gear oil on your chain. These are O-ring chains and don’t need (or benefit from) thick oils or greases, plus they make a big damn mess! Read the thread about maintaining a chain using only WD-40. I don’t go that far, so I use a spray on chain lube specifically for O-ring chains that leaves a dry film and doesn’t attract (much) dirt.
 
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