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Discussion Starter #1
Lubrication of the chain.
Every 400 miles as stated in the manual, the KLR chain is lubricated using a spray can with chain oil and applied to the chain on the side that the teeth of the sprockets enter the chain. Turning the wheel to cover the length of the chain. Is this form appropriate or should I change? What technique do you recommend?
 

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You are doing it correctly, Dicky.
Spraying the inside of the lower chain run whilst turning the system ensures that the lubricant penetrates the roller/bushing/sprocket teeth interface areas, with the help of centrifugal force. :)
 

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I always clean the chain prior to lubing it and I've started using Liquid Wrench chain lube which I get at Advance Auto Parts store for $4 per can. It drys after application so it reduces the amount of grit that the sticky lubes seem to attract. AND zero mess on the swingarm and back wheel. It also uses PTFE which I think is teflon and Boron Nitride which is an dry extreme pressure industrial lubricant. Boron Nitride is also used as a treatment inside rifle bores to reduce the friction caused by swaging a bullet down through a barrel. It is superior to moly for that purpose so it must be great for between the rollers and pins of a cycle chain.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I spin the wheel and spray with WD40. Good enough to last Wattman (Bill) 34,000 miles is good enough for me......and no mess. :)

http://watt-man.com/uploads/WD40experiment.pdf


cheers,
Dave
In the article The WD40 Experiment, I found these lines at the end of the first paragraph. And now I'm a little confused.

"the KLR has an o-ring chain, and the lube is inside the O-ringed
areas ... and all I'm doing is keeping the O-rings clean and alive by spraying with WD40. "


I ask. The factory chain comes with lubricant inside and this is protected by the O-rings? Or did I understand wrong.

I always thought that the lubricant was put on it so that it penetrated all the moving parts of the chain so that it would not have friction wear. Well at least the least possible wear.

Saludos.
 

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In the article The WD40 Experiment, I found these lines at the end of the first paragraph. And now I'm a little confused.

"the KLR has an o-ring chain, and the lube is inside the O-ringed
areas ... and all I'm doing is keeping the O-rings clean and alive by spraying with WD40. "


I ask. The factory chain comes with lubricant inside and this is protected by the O-rings? Or did I understand wrong.

I always thought that the lubricant was put on it so that it penetrated all the moving parts of the chain so that it would not have friction wear. Well at least the least possible wear.

Saludos.
Yes, while the KLR has an O ring chain,the O rings are located between the inner and outer plates. The rollers between the inner plates are NOT sealed by anything. This is why the manual states to lube the chain. If not lubed the rollers wear against the pins in the area under them. This wearing causes the rollers to get thin and the pin diameter under the rollers to get smaller giving the illusion that the chain is stretching. Equally important to lubing those rollers is to keep it clean. Silica mixes with the lube forming abrasive paste under the rollers and will quickly wear out a chain no matter how much chain lube you spray on it. If you ride on pavement then you can probably go the full 400 miles before lubing. If like me you're mostly on dirt roads then it is at least an every Saturday morning affair, but FIRST I clean it thoroughly with Kerosene and a parts brush flushing that paste from inside the unsealed rollers. Since I ride mostly dirt I use the Liquid Wrench cable and chain lube that dries after penetrating the links so as it minimize the attraction of dirt.
As for the WD 40, WD40 is composed mostly of Stoddard solvent with approx 25% light oil. OK for light rust protection, but has virtually zero high pressure lubricating qualities. The reason those who use WD get good life out of their chains is because it cleans them, not lubing them. I prefer spending the $5 on an entire gallon of kerosene to clean mine with VS $5 for a few ounces in a spray can.
 

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Actually the o rings (or x rings) do seal the pin and bushings as well.....the only parts of an o ring chain that can possibly receive any benefit from lubing is the outside roller to sprocket interface....and the lube tends to attract/hold dirt and dust which reduces its effectiveness. But aside from the technical discussion, Bill has proven that you can get pretty decent life just keeping the chain clean and free from corrosion (which is all the WD really does). You might be able to get even more chain life using a real lube to help that bushing to sprocket interface but for me, it's not worth the mess.

2 cents
Dave
 

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Actually the o rings (or x rings) do seal the pin and bushings as well.....the only parts of an o ring chain that can possibly receive any benefit from lubing is the outside roller to sprocket interface....and the lube tends to attract/hold dirt and dust which reduces its effectiveness. But aside from the technical discussion, Bill has proven that you can get pretty decent life just keeping the chain clean and free from corrosion (which is all the WD really does). You might be able to get even more chain life using a real lube to help that bushing to sprocket interface but for me, it's not worth the mess.

2 cents
Dave
All I can say is on my 2018 KLR there seems to be only 2 O rings per pin and they appear to be located between the inner and outer plates. When I spray my chain I clearly see lube entering the roller bushings and when cleaning I clearly see black gunk washing out of there.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O-ring_chain

https://www.motosport.com/blog/o-ring-chain-vs-non-o-ring
 

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Where 'n What I don't know, but...

Kerosene cleans our O-Ring Chains safely (w/o deteriorating any rubber o-rings).
It makes no sense to me to Lube w/o cleaning but let's be honest...
I do it all the time.
I clean the chain when it's more gunky than less gunky.
And I like ChainWax since it's sticks and it doesn't change the color of my rear wheel
(aesthetics are important despite my having a KLR).

I can also admit I don't Lube my Chain every 400 miles. I hesitate to admit how often I DON'T,
but I've gotten better over the years thank-you-very-much.

I do enjoy a clean (and quieter) chain!!!
 

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I lost my attempt at an earlier reply, timed out by interruption.

Some of you seem to be over-looking (miss-typing) the difference between the rivet pin being SEALED by the o-rings with-in the Interior diameter of the BUSHING and the ROLLER needing lubricant on both its Interior & Exterior surfaces.

When the Interior of the Roller wears on the Exterior of the Bushing, the roller just rattles around bushing a little more.

When the Outside Diameter of the Rivet Pin wears along with the Inside Diameter of the Bushing, the resulting clearance increases the effective rivet pin center to rivet pin center, commonly referred to as chain 'stretch'.

When a drive chain has TOO little Slack or the 'sealed in' grease is worn-out or the o-rings begin to fail ( and let dirt in) the wear rate of the Rivet Pin and the Interior diameter of the Bushing accelerates dramatically.

This is not how I tried to explain it earlier, when it was still simple. Now its "SNAFU"ed, imo.
 

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All I can say is on my 2018 KLR there seems to be only 2 O rings per pin and they appear to be located between the inner and outer plates. When I spray my chain I clearly see lube entering the roller bushings and when cleaning I clearly see black gunk washing out of there.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O-ring_chain

https://www.motosport.com/blog/o-ring-chain-vs-non-o-ring
I'm on a tablet so my cut and paste skills are failing; read the paragraph under "Construction" in the wiki link you posted and all should become clear. If you are getting lube between the pins and bushings on your sealed chain, your chain is shot



Dave
 

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My understanding is an o ring or x ring chain is lubed internally for the life of the chain, and clean and lube of the exterior is intended to preserve the rubber seal.
Having riden mostly shaft drive bikes for the last 20 some odd years, I’m relatively new to chain drive. Hell when I was young we never even cleaned or lubed the dang things.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
After the information compiled with the correct comments of all. I cleaned the chain with kerosene and then I put it on WD40.
During the process it seemed to me that the inner side of the rear sprocket showed wear on the right side differently than the left side of it. Think of the alignment of the tire and look at the marks. The one on the right side seems to me to be more advanced than the one on the left side. This may be what is making the wear different. I would say more wear on the right side. I enclose a few pics. Hope te pics help
 

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After the information compiled with the correct comments of all. I cleaned the chain with kerosene and then I put it on WD40.
During the process it seemed to me that the inner side of the rear sprocket showed wear on the right side differently than the left side of it. Think of the alignment of the tire and look at the marks. The one on the right side seems to me to be more advanced than the one on the left side. This may be what is making the wear different. I would say more wear on the right side. I enclose a few pics. Hope te pics help
When you adjust chain tension you can't just align the marks on the swingarm like the manual says to do, "IF" you are looking for the best alignment. The better way is with the wheel off the ground, (by hand) spin the rear wheel through 3 or 4 revolutions and let it stop on it's own without any outside interference like by grabbing it with the brakes, etc.. Note where the teeth on the sprocket are in relation to the two inner plates of the chain. If off to one side and not centered equally between the two your wheel is out of alignment. Turn the adjusters until it runs true regardless of whether the swingarm marks are equal. When your rear wheel and of course rear sprocket, is in the proper alignment with the front sprocket the chain will run with the rear sprocket teeth dead center on the bushings between the two inner plates of the chain.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I delayed answering because I was outside the city. today look at the chain and the teeth of the sprocket. and they are not centered. I'm going to make the adjustment on the weekend. Thanks for the information.
 
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