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I just ran across this item in a box of extras in my garage. I saw a thread a while back with how-to suggestions for stuck fasteners. This tool doesn't need anything except a hammer to whack it (always a good with frozen bolts). Another method if you don't have air tools or are just a cheap bastard. 20201016_124548.jpg
 

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I just ran across this item in a box of extras in my garage. I saw a thread a while back with how-to suggestions for stuck fasteners. This tool doesn't need anything except a hammer to whack it (always a good with frozen bolts). Another method if you don't have air tools or are just a cheap bastard. View attachment 28536
I have used mine for over 50 years on old Hondas. Get a set of JIS bits and this thing is magic.
 

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I have used mine for over 50 years on old Hondas. Get a set of JIS bits and this thing is magic.
Goes to show it doesn't have to cost big bucks to do the job. I'll keep it handy for next time so I don't have to get out the compressor and implements of destruction. I'm kinda curious now - where's a frozen bolt when you need one....
 

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I once had two of the things, and used them quite a bit. They both disappeared at some point. One I bought at White Front and the other came from a NAPA store.
 

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Was going to suggest J.C. Whitney where I got mine 40 yrs ago and then found the Company was bought by CarParts.com last year and basically scuttled. So sad. Whitney had awesome prices on Off-road and Bike parts and accessories. Built up a lot of fun vehicles with their stuff.
 

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I once had two of the things, and used them quite a bit. They both disappeared at some point. One I bought at White Front and the other came from a NAPA store.
Whoops, now I know where I got mine.... Wow, White Front. Takin a ride in the way-back machine. TC
 

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Hey Tom, out of morbid curiosity, how in the hell do you remember buying that tool at White Front? They went OOB 40 or 50 years ago. Inquiring minds want to know. I can't remember where I got my last tool. Apparently I'm not as careful with my brain cells. TC
 

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Where's Damocles? He's a big fan of these things.
As, "Lurch," in "The Addams Family," said: "You . . . rang?" :)

Yes . . . IMPACT DRIVERS have been my friends, for over HALF A CENTURY!

I first met them, trying to remove steel machine screws from my Honda Super Hawk's aluminum alloy cases. GALVANIC CORROSION makes the dissimilar metals adhere to each other.

My first impact driver was a Snap-On Blue Point jewel; flag down the next Snap-On truck you see if you want one, but . . . BRING MONEY!!!!!!!!!!!

Otherwise, Harbor Freight markets a usable impact driver for a fraction of the Blue Point's price tag. Then, at a no-name wholesale marketer's store in Louisiana, I found . . . a 1/2" square drive impact driver! This instrument has been effective freeing, "bet you can't!" fasteners.

Beyond, my wife gave me a 7-amp 1/2" square drive Sears electric impact driver as a present. How I love it!

Today, I also have a Ryobi (?) rechargeable battery-powered impact driver. Compact, flexible, always ready and convenient to use.

As mentioned in a post above, JIS bits will make your life simpler and more enjoyable, if you work on Japanese motorcycles!

With a little common sense, as in, DON'T use a sledge hammer, carburetor screws can be removed, without buggering the screw heads; likewise, the brake master cylinder reservoir screws.

So, if you're working on Japanese bikes, I'd advise procurement of an impact driver. You'll thank me!

BTW: WHY is an impact driver so successful? Because, torque is applied to the fastener ONLY when the threads are relieved by an impact blow. Under impact, the threads become more willing to let each other go.
 

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How I wish I'd had one at 16 when my first real fixit job on my Honda was splitting the cases to replace 3rd gear. Must've ruined half of them. I only had screwdrivers and a socket set back then (plus a hammer). I wouldn't attempt an oil change with those tools now. Ah, to be young and foolish.... I never thought about why impact works but it makes sense. I always figured it had something to do with beating the crap out of it... TC
 

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Thanks guys. I did a quick google search before I posted and the first page was full of questionable sites from Taiwan or similar.

I'll pick one up at Harbor Freight next time I'm there.
 

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Hey Tom, out of morbid curiosity, how in the hell do you remember buying that tool at White Front? They went OOB 40 or 50 years ago. Inquiring minds want to know. I can't remember where I got my last tool. Apparently I'm not as careful with my brain cells. TC
White Front was iconic. Some things that shouldn't have made a memory do so, other things that should don't.
The Torrance White Front can be seen in the background of this photo. It closed in 1974.
28542
 

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I got mine from Sears in 1977 or so, not surprisingly, to work on motorcycles. As Damocles noted, zinc-plated screws into aluminum cases would really get stuck due to light galvanic corrosion and about the only thing that could get them out was a hand impact driver. I’m pretty sure Richard Pirsig mentioned them in his timeless book “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.”

It’s not the Craftsman brand but one of the cheaper tools they carried at the time. Made in Japan, so it actually was pretty good. I still have it, although my electric impact driver is what I use these days.
 

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I grabbed mine about 17 or 18 years ago com a harbor freight in Shreveport. Also for working on old motorcycles. Specifically for splitting the cases on a 1977 Suzuki GS.
Since then I’ve used them quite a bit at work to get old corroded fasteners out on 60 year old aircraft.


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I'll pile on! I learned as a 14 year old how necessary an impact driver was in 1974 when I started cracking cases on my Honda SL70. Pretty sure Dad clued me in when I started ruining the heads with likely the wrong size screwdrivers. The one I have in my toolbox now I don't think was his, but I'm not sure. I probably left his in the wet grass next to the basement door and he hit it with the lawnmower. Sorry Dad....
 

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How did I remove fasteners BEFORE I had an impact driver?

1. Lay motorcycle on its side in the street.
2. Insert bit of brace-and-bit into screw head.
3. Lie down, placing as much body weight as possible on brace-and-bit upper handle.
4. Crank brace-and-bit counter-clockwise, extracting screw.
 
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