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GOOD LORD! I haven't the time to read all of the comments currently.

But I will ask if with the front wheel Elevated, does is spin freely?
A severely dragging front brake could have caused the front tire to skid & slide out on sandy/gravelly asphalt or concrete.
Or did you maybe have your fingers on the front brake lever?

I install early take-off oem Dunlop K750's onto both ends of my '87 on a regular basis. I'll ride them til thin, no problem & I live in the Rocky Mtn rock pile & near the Red Desert of WY. I've even ridden them around Ouray, Silverton, Telluride CO.
 

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2022 KRL 650
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I don't have a lot to say, it could be your bike, or it could be something you did that others didn't notice. I am still running stock everything, but to have crash bars and pannier racks. I will probably break 1k this weekend. I am taking it on little trips around town. Over the past week, they have put new gravel on the roads, and so far I have not had an issue. I am making sure that everything is straight whenever I hit a patch of gravel that hasn't been driven over. Eventually, I want to try some better tires, but for now, am going to rock what I have on it. I think they are good, but I have much less experience and go a lot slower. Overall I have been loving my '22.
 

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I hope after reading the comments and suggestions that you change your mind about selling it. Check a few things out and then get some more seat time on it. Don’t be in a hurry to fix it, you may drop it again.

I had a similar incident when I picked up my Goldwing when I first bought it. Dropped it right in front of the guy I bought it from. I’m sure he was glad he had his money already.
 
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I had a similar incident when I picked up my Goldwing when I first bought it. Dropped it right in front of the guy I bought it from. I’m sure he was glad he had his money already.
What the...? Who the...? Why I oughta! Son of a... Piece a...! Who threw that rock at me...?
 

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KLRs: 2013, 2005, 1998, 1987; 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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What Klr4evr said. Don’t fix the scuffs. KLRs are supposed to have some dirt and scratches on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I have a motorcycle stand and will check out the front end situation.

As far as the dump, we were on a fairly steep hill, so I had to keep my hand on the front brake lever to keep from sliding backwards, so I bet I didn't release it quick enough and with the front tire on that loose gravel, it was an instant dump.

The group I was riding with did a video of our ride. You never see me since I was behind the guy with the camera, but you can see the spot where I wiped out.


Tire Automotive parking light Wheel Cloud Sky
 

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I can attest as well, our stock front tires are horrible in gravel. I approach any gravel very cautiously and minimize any drastic turning of the handlebar, lest the front end washes out in the blink of an eye
 

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Much of this oem front tire and gravel performance depends on the type of gravel. I ran gravel with the oem tires just fine until I found deep loose gravel and that was interesting. Still doable but the dot knobbies I'm running now are night and day better.
 

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I have a 2018 tiger 800 xca that I'm riding around the world (currently made it to Peru) and am back in the states now riding my 2017 klr. I only have about 1,500 miles under my belt on the KLR and would say I'm just starting to get the hang of it. It is much more planted and confident on the pavement at speeds, but no better than the tiger on gravel. In fact, I'd say the tiger is much harder to handle on gravel and more top heavy than the klr. For what it's worth from a guy who has lots of miles on tiger and a few in klr, I don't find klr to be at all difficult on gravel compared to other adv bikes. Sure, it's not a 250 with knobbies, but once I had the rising style down and experience on various types of gravel, I find it great.

Its also funny to me that we talk about gravel. There are hundreds of types and on a day Ling ride I can go through a dozen different types thst all require a different riding style.

My humble opinion is put another 500 off road miles and 1,000 on road and then make the decision about selling or not. The klr is well battle tested and keeps on selling for a reason. It's a great bike for me and many thousands of others but if it's not the bike for you that is ok too. I just don't think I would personally be able to tell anything after a few hundred miles.

And drinking and riding is not cool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Ordered a new brake lever and some Tusk hand guards. Will have time Saturday to put it on the lift and try to figure out the tracking issue. Rear pressure is 35 and front is 37. Going to do some sanding and paint touch up of the passenger foot peg, rear brake lever, and pannier rack. Rust is not cool. Going to put an Idaho-themed sticker on the right fairing, and ignore the front fender.

I have a buddy that lives nearby that owns a Gen 2 and has his all kitted out and goes on extended trips. I'm going to see if he could ride mine and let me know if we are experiencing the same thing. We're both about the same height and weight. I really want to be able to have confidence in this bike and myself.
 

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KLRs: 2013, 2005, 1998, 1987; 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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Comparing to your friend’s bike should tell you a lot. You should also politely ask to ride his on the road to see if it wanders like yours.
 

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Rear pressure is 35 and front is 37.
This one of the FEW times anyone will ever here me to suggest Lowering ones tire pressures.

Try 34 Front & 32 Rear. It might have helped a little bit on that sandy/gravelly road shoulder.
I run 32 Front & 30 Rear nearly all the time.
But you are heavier than I & so is your bike heavier than a Gen 1, but you probably don't ride 85-95mph like I can in the wide open desolation of WY. So tire heating should not be any issue at your speeds.
 

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PNWexplorer:

I agree with you. I think the KLR is very top heavy, compared to all the other bikes I have ridden. I have a 32" inseam and I have almost tipped my KLR over in the parking lot at work, in my garage, at the gas station. My driveway is on an incline. I have a security camera that has filmed me riding up to the garage door a bit squirrelly. My wife commented about it and asked if the bike was too big for me. I told her no, it's just a bit top heavy and I came in to the driveway a little hot. Like someone else mentioned, its top heavy especially with a full tank of gas.

Regarding what you said about how the KLR rides on the street. I noticed that all of the other riders in your group were riding full-on street bikes. That might be a factor. Although the KLR does great on the street, compared to a street bike, it will be lacking.

Regarding tire pressure. If I know I am going to be riding some dirt or gravel roads, I set my tire pressure to about 22psi. If I know the ride is going to be all street I set my tire pressure to around 28psi. I run Shinko 244s. I ride a Gen1 so my bike is a little lighter than yours.

I would say get a little more seat time on the KLR. If you still don't feel comfortable, then maybe sell the KLR and get a bike with a lower seat height.

Although I think the KLR has lots of faults, I do enjoy riding it. I have put 24,000 miles on mine in a little less than 5 years.

That's my $0.02
 

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2022 Khaki no abs, Thermobob 2, tusk panniers gen2, modified crash bars gen2, Tusk D-flex, 16t front
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I bought a Shinko 244 rear for my Gen 3 and was going to order a matching front next paycheck, but saw some responses around the net indicating that running a different tread pattern rear is pretty common.

I have no idea if running the factory front and a more aggressive rear will make the bike more squirrely on the street or not.
Maybe it DID make it squirrelly? Maybe after you get the 244 front tire it will feel better? Maybe track better? I think you can totally fix the issues 👍 I'm not saying the Klr doesn't like gravel necessarily. I'm saying the tire choices on the Klr may not like gravel & Tire choices especially front and rear tread pattern differences can make it track differently too. & Gravel on top of asphalt...? With our skinny tires? Forget it. I'm on My 3rd set of tires on my 2022 & I know for sure My Klr is a totally different machine with the anakee wilds just saying. Now it Handles gravel like a champ, holds a line in a corner very well and hits 85mph+ on the interstate smoothly without tracking on my very first personal static Ballancing job. No, This is Not a Michelin commercial 🤣👎 there are a bunch of good tire choices out there. I hope it all works out good for you 😎👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Worked on the bike today; repaired all of the damage and just waiting on the lever, hand guards, and crash bars.

Adjusted tire pressure down (still running stock tires; haven't had the new tire installed), and put it on a lift to check the front. It was perfect, but that little tank bag I had strapped to the handle bar would rub on the tank and prevented the handlebars from turning fully. Pretty sure that's not what was causing the issue, but removed it anyway.

No test ride since the brake lever snapped off when trying to straighten, so just waiting on the parts.

So far, so good. covered the scrape on the fairing with a strip of skateboard tape and put a matching one on the other side.

Wheel Crankset Hub gear Bicycle tire Tire

Tire Wheel Bicycle tire Automotive tire Bicycle wheel

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Car Vehicle
 

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Looking Good!
Man I really need to wash my KLR!!

Worked on the bike today; repaired all of the damage and just waiting on the lever, hand guards, and crash bars.

Adjusted tire pressure down (still running stock tires; haven't had the new tire installed), and put it on a lift to check the front. It was perfect, but that little tank bag I had strapped to the handle bar would rub on the tank and prevented the handlebars from turning fully. Pretty sure that's not what was causing the issue, but removed it anyway.

No test ride since the brake lever snapped off when trying to straighten, so just waiting on the parts.

So far, so good. covered the scrape on the fairing with a strip of skateboard tape and put a matching one on the other side.

View attachment 34991
View attachment 34990
View attachment 34989
 

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One must remove hand levers from the bike, clamp in a vise & used full power from a Propane torch to Gently straighten bent hand levers. Clamp a junky pair of Vise Grips to the ball and LET the Heat to the work. Keep the heat just Below the section to be re-formed, because the heat rises to the thinner section.
Just keep one finger on the vise grip Very Lightly to make the lever 'creep' in the direction needed. DO NOT FORCE IT. Just let it creep.
Takes about 5-10 minutes per lever.
 
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