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Discussion Starter #1
I got called today for a motorcycle vs vehicle accident. Fortunately the motorcyclist was more or less okay, but pretty shaken. He was going about 50 mph (in a 50) when a car pulled out without seeing him. He slowed to ~40, jumped right before impact, cleared the hood of the car landing on the ground. He had no major injuries and his biggest concern in the ambulance was getting a hold of his girlfriend. None the less, due to mechanism, he was examined thoroughly and taken to the hospital to have around 10 doctors assess him. The bike was totaled and car had minor fender damage.

Just a reminder to keep your eyes peeled and expect the worst as we are invisible.

In case anyone wonders about how it works in my county, in order to meet the criteria to be a trauma activation (taken to a specific trauma hospital and have specialty crews waiting arrival) there are a few ways to do it. Patients can be trauma activated by their condition, their injuries, or the incident. Any motorcycle crash over 20 mph is a trauma activation. Other criteria for comparison are car wrecks over 40 mph or being in the same vehicle as someone who died in the wreck.

What we do is dangerous, so keep your eyes wide and tires down.
 

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Sobering no doubt.

I suppose you are going to see a lot of this in your chosen profession.

Definitely have to stay aware and have an escape plan.

Glad he was okay.
 

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Not that it's not always dangerous, but it seems to be the worst in the Spring when people aren't used to seeing motorcycles on the road. I ride like I'm invisible all the time, but am especially wary at this time of year.
 

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I got called today for a motorcycle vs vehicle accident. Fortunately the motorcyclist was more or less okay, but pretty shaken. He was going about 50 mph (in a 50) when a car pulled out without seeing him. He slowed to ~40, jumped right before impact, cleared the hood of the car landing on the ground...


What we do is dangerous, so keep your eyes wide and tires down.

Thanx for the work you do!

I see forum posts talking about swerving, jumping off, laying her down, etc. but realistically the only sensible thing to do is to reduce speed first and foremost.

Consider, the potential energy at impact is the mass times the velocity squared! Any decrease in the velocity will have a significant reduction in impact energy.

Practice panic stops from the speeds you ride at. Seriously. Learn how to get hard on you brakes without going down. Start off slow but get up to full speed. If all you ever do is practice in parking lots @ 25 mph you won't be prepared for a full on butt clencher @ 60 mph.
 

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In case anyone wonders about how it works in my county, in order to meet the criteria to be a trauma activation (taken to a specific trauma hospital and have specialty crews waiting arrival) there are a few ways to do it. Patients can be trauma activated by their condition, their injuries, or the incident. Any motorcycle crash over 20 mph is a trauma activation. Other criteria for comparison are car wrecks over 40 mph or being in the same vehicle as someone who died in the wreck.
Can a person opt out of the trauma activation?

The last crash I was involved in was in 2003 and happened at about 60 mph. I needed a visit to the emergency room, but certainly didn't need to go to a trauma hospital.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Can a person opt out of the trauma activation?

The last crash I was involved in was in 2003 and happened at about 60 mph. I needed a visit to the emergency room, but certainly didn't need to go to a trauma hospital.
Kind of. If you are in the mental capacity to make medical decisions for yourself, then you have the right to choose what treatment and transport you receive. However, the treatment you will receive from a trauma center is much better than any other hospital. Trauma centers are equipped to handle internal bleeding and other major injuries. Their doctors are also much more proficient in assessing a trauma patient in a rapid, thorough method.

In order to refuse the transport to a trauma center, you must first prove that you are oriented to person, place, time, and event. So basically state your name, what city you are in, the year, and what happened (i.e. "I wrecked my bike"). The paramedics will then advise you of the risks of your refusal. They will also most likely have to call the base hospital and speak with a doctor, then have you speak with the doctor. Lastly you will most likely have to sign that you are refusing the treatment or transport.

All in all, the protocols exist to protect the rider and it is impossible to tell if you have internal bleeding without an ultrasound and a CT scan, neither machine is available in an ambulance. So if you like life, I'd recommend just biting your lip and going to the trauma center.
 

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All in all, the protocols exist to protect the rider and it is impossible to tell if you have internal bleeding without an ultrasound and a CT scan, neither machine is available in an ambulance. So if you like life, I'd recommend just biting your lip and going to the trauma center.
I remember getting checked out by members of the local volunteer fire department and it was fairly clear that, other than a broken hand, I didn't have any other serious injuries. I was still trying to figure out how I could ride the bike back home for a little while. :)
 

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Thanks for the reminder. I feel we need to be reminded of this type of situation often. It's so easy to become complacent. Glad the rider was ok.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I remember getting checked out by members of the local volunteer fire department and it was fairly clear that, other than a broken hand, I didn't have any other serious injuries. I was still trying to figure out how I could ride the bike back home for a little while. :)
Glad to hear you were all right and a bruised ego was the greatest of your concerns ;-)
 

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Glad to hear you were all right and a bruised ego was the greatest of your concerns ;-)
Actually, the broken hand, followed closely by the totaled Ducati Monster were the biggest of my concerns.

But the event did cause me to refocus my riding efforts toward being a safer rider. That's still my number one focus when riding on the street.
 

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I always try to ride as though everyone else is out to kill me. Make sure my horn works each ride, watch oncoming cars for drivers hands on the steering wheel starting to turn, watch the wheels of cars on side streets starting to roll, stay in the lane position that makes me most visible, ALWAYS were my riding gear, minimize riding in congested areas when possible (not often). It truely is a jungle out there. Ride Safely guys and gals.
 

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. He slowed to ~40, jumped right before impact, cleared the hood of the car landing on the ground.
Was this guy a movie stuntman by chance? I have always wondered about this type of collision, and having the presence of mind to do something such as jumping over the hood at the last possible second. Personally, I dont think I would be able to think fast enough to do this. After years of crashing dirt bikes, the only thing i can remember going thru my mind when i realized a crash was inevitable was "OH S*@T, this is going to hurt!!". I am impressed by the Cool-Hand-Luke types that can calmly stare certain death in the face and make decisions at high speed.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Was this guy a movie stuntman by chance?
Don't think so. He did not land on his feet. I think if you're standing at impact you'll end up going up and over, maybe bruise up a bit or break something on your bars, but you'll clear that hood without a problem.
 

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There have been a few nasty accidents around here lately. Cars crossing lanes and median strips. Scary stuff. Some things you can't avoid, but most you can. If you never forget that the wheelchair or coffin ain't that far away. Morbid, maybe, but keeps me honest.
 

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Totally agree with Spec--took stayin safe" course--taught us to PRACTICE stopping as quickly as we could from 55mph. (129ft. On V-Strom). Also practice swerving at 50mph. Lastly remember 90 percent of car/motorcycle accidents happen at intersections-and driveways count-so watch each one like a hawk!
 

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I agree with the stay on the brakes until impact to lose as much inertia as possible before the crash strategy. Every situation is different and my last close call (posted in here somewhere) I used an evasive maneuver instead of the brakes. Instinct or something, I can't tell you. Thankfully it worked out for me but if it hadn't it would have been ugly. I just can't see myself jumping off or "layin' her down" and losing all control.
 

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Something to remember, there is almost always a way out, you need to put yourself in a position to get to that way out. A motorcycle is less than 3' wide, thats all the room you need to escape, you just need to insure you are at the right place and the right speed to make the escape. I know that sounds too simple but none the less, its true.
 

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I agree with ray, always look for your "exit",whether at a stop light or passing a driveway. I was behind a tractor trailer when one of his left rear tires "delaminated"--- had I not practiced high speed swerving, my wife and I would have probably had a high-side nasty. Plus, on roads, we both wear ATGATT.
 
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