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You need to have an adapter that goes from 14mm down to 12mm. Here is one: https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-20540-12mm-Spark-Adapter/dp/B00CEX5BNW/ref=asc_df_B00CEX5BNW/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=312158556601&hvpos=1o5&hvnetw=g&hvrand=984081478339686170&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9031025&hvtargid=pla-570776027741&psc=1

Horrid Fright doesn't seem to carry them and they don't seem to have the $10 compression test kits that had a full set of adapters in it anymore, either.

Might be you could get one at NAPA or AutoZone.
Or . . . FLAG DOWN the next Snap-On truck you see!

P.S. Bring money!

:)

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Agree with post above; doubt low compression surfaces as the root/primary cause of the problem; thoroughly cleaning and adjusting the carburetor (q.v., "Carb Overhaul" post on this forum) and checking/adjusting valve clearance might be easier and less cumbersome than a compression check; may solve the problem.
 

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Snap-On? In the Willamette Valley? Only passing through on I-5 at about 75mph. ;^)

I stayed in a lovely B&B, CH Bailey House; it was out east of Roseburg. Great country but most everything that has spark plugs is green and yeller and runs like a deer.
 
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Discussion Starter #24
We're not as backwards as all that. I know what a Snap-On truck is. I think I even saw one once, somewhere.

Man, the valve clearance check was a little more involved than I thought it was going to be. Getting the valve cover out of there was like some kind of Chinese puzzle. I got my camshafts out! I hope I can get it all together.

So...The Left Exhaust was 0.15 mm (0.006")
Right Exhaust 0.15 mm (0.006")
Left Intake 0.05 mm (0.002")
Right Intake 0.06 mm (0.0025")

Both exhausts were right on the tight edge of being in spec and both intakes were too tight.

I wanted to shoot for the loose end of the specs for both, but the guy at the motorcycle shop convinced me to shoot for the middle of the upper and lower limits. Shims ain't cheap for a KLR, by the way.

The guy said the valves could contribute to my starting problems but he leaned towards it being a carburetor issue also. Tomorrow I'll pull the carb off and check for mud chiggers in the jets.
 

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The guy said the valves could contribute to my starting problems but he leaned towards it being a carburetor issue also. Tomorrow I'll pull the carb off and check for mud chiggers in the jets.
Please, oh PLEASE, Skook: Take a look at this:

https://www.klrforum.com/how-tos-tech-guides/19026-carb-overhaul.html

On re-assembly, make sure the needle jet (or, "collar," or whatever one might call the part) is installed properly. And the slide spring holder. And, be sure the diaphragm is properly sound, seated, and sealed. You've verified fuel flow from the petcock, right?

Good luck!
 

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I do not mess with metric measurements for valve tappets. As I've never found a feeler set marked in .025mm (.001inch) increments.

I always hope to achieve at least a loose ,006 or .007 inch on the Intakes. But preferably a Snug .008 inches, but never a loose .008" on intakes.

Also at least a loose .008 or .009 inch on Exhausts. But preferably a Snug .010 inches, but never a loose .010" on exhausts.

I write my existing clearances as such to help guide shim choice.
Could be <.006" / or could be .006" / or could be >.006" on either of your exhaust valves.

On a <.006 one should be able to use 2 sizes thinner and achieve either <.010" or a perfect snug .010".
Remember we are working with a lot stiffer springs than ignition breaker points.
 

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Too Coarse to be of much use. IMO.

It's just so simple to remember that shims are only available in .002 inch increments. And if an exhaust valve is measuring at >.008 or <.009 that is a good as it can get!
As close to maximum as possible without going over spec.
 

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It's .002, .004, .005, .006, .007, .008, .010, .012. (I added the .009 to mine)
 

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All I can say is that it's a dang good thing that we didn't use the metric system to send a man to the moon. Look what happened with the Mars Climate Orbiter. Those guys would be out of the solar system by now. Either that or a new crater on the moon...

Only in the metric system could Newton disguise himself by drawing a square meter box on the ground and standing in it. He'd look just like Pascal.

Our system of torque is screwed up due to colloquial misuse of terms. We say pound-feet and foot-pounds interchangeably but it really should be pound-force-feet. It is intuitive, though, as it is essentially the force that gravity exerts on one pound of mass at a lever at a point of one foot from a pivot. Easy to understand.

What the jump the **** up and down is a Newton-meter, though? A Newton is a force that accelerates a kilogram at one meter per second. Heh? You stick that out on the end of a one-meter lever and you've got some torque. It's completely non-intuitive.

Now, if'n a Newton was whatever Isaac massed, say 80Kg, and given an acceleration equal to gravity at 9.8 m/s that might make some sense. We could wrap our head around that, as a N-m would be something like 175 pounds sitting at the end of a threeish foot lever. That's like 60ish ft-lbs. But less than a quarter ft-lb? Nah, it will never fly.
 

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I don't have a problem with the 'metric system'. I have a problem with 'too coarse' of measurements & 'rounding' of measurement tools.

Then owners whine and whimper about "tick, tick, tick" from their valve train!

When in doubt about valve train tappet clearnace I'll suggest that it is best to error on the snug side of things. (At least if one is aiming for the wide side of specs.) For longest interval between checks & adjustments.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Holy s***! Tom, you made those videos? I watched those when I initially pulled my carburetor off when I unmothballed my bike. They were invaluable. Very well done.

I followed them pretty closely, but I'm going to pull the carburetor again today and check the usual suspects. I've got nothing to do until the valve shims arrive anyway.
 

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All I can say is that it's a dang good thing that we didn't use the metric system to send a man to the moon. Look what happened with the Mars Climate Orbiter. Those guys would be out of the solar system by now. Either that or a new crater on the moon...

Only in the metric system could Newton disguise himself by drawing a square meter box on the ground and standing in it. He'd look just like Pascal.

Our system of torque is screwed up due to colloquial misuse of terms. We say pound-feet and foot-pounds interchangeably but it really should be pound-force-feet. It is intuitive, though, as it is essentially the force that gravity exerts on one pound of mass at a lever at a point of one foot from a pivot. Easy to understand.

What the jump the **** up and down is a Newton-meter, though? A Newton is a force that accelerates a kilogram at one meter per second. Heh? You stick that out on the end of a one-meter lever and you've got some torque. It's completely non-intuitive.

Now, if'n a Newton was whatever Isaac massed, say 80Kg, and given an acceleration equal to gravity at 9.8 m/s that might make some sense. We could wrap our head around that, as a N-m would be something like 175 pounds sitting at the end of a threeish foot lever. That's like 60ish ft-lbs. But less than a quarter ft-lb? Nah, it will never fly.
Confining the post to discussing measurement of length (never mind mass, force, torque, "weight," etc.):

Who but the FRENCH could come up with an idea for the "meter" (or, "metre"), with a nonsensical idea such as this (as WikipediA tells us):

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. . . the commission – whose members included Lagrange, Laplace, Monge and Condorcet – decided that the new measure should be equal to one ten-millionth of the distance from the North Pole to the Equator (the quadrant of the Earth's circumference), measured along the meridian passing through Paris.

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Flaws include . . . the earth ain't exactly ROUND; rather, the geometric solid remains an OBLATE spheroid . . . thus, meridian length doesn't conform to earth surface latitude angle consistently from pole to pole; the French at the time measured only ground distance. And, wouldn't you know, they chose the meridian passing through PARIS, not GREENWICH!

How DARE they subsume our sacred English system of length measurement, obscenely trashing (for a questionable global presumption) the sacred inch, foot, yard, mile, chain, furlong, hand, rod/pole/perch, I could go on!

Without the furlong, how does one know the length of a horse race? Without the hand, how can a horse's height be specified?

Oh, the French (and other Europeans) went ON. In modern terms, they defined the meter as (ibid.):


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The metre, symbol m, is the SI unit of length. It is defined by taking the fixed numerical value of the speed of light in vacuum c to be 299792458 when expressed in the unit m⋅s−1, where the second is defined in terms of the caesium frequency ΔνCs.

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Now, I ask you: How many of us posses instrumentation capable of measuring the speed of light (in a vacuum, no less) in our garages/shops?

With the English system, ordinary objects determine units of length. For example, three barleycorns, end to end, occupy a distance of one inch in length. A foot? I don't have to tell you. A yard? Distance from one's nose to the middle finger of an outstretched arm and hand.

Not only does the Metric System Conspiracy trash the ENGLISH units of measurement, for those living in Texas, forget the Vara:

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Vara: a Texas unit of length equal to 33.33 inches (84.66 centimeters).

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Even today, former Spanish/Mexican acreage in Texas is described in varas, in official courthouse land records.

Obviously, we must RESIST the Metric System Conspiracy! Do not speak, write, or type in the metric syntax; instead, use our beloved English system.

(It's o.k. to use the Biblical "cubit," the distance from one's elbow to the extended hand's middle finger.)

Now, where are my WHITWORTH wrenches??????????????

:)
 

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Discussion Starter #35
If I'd known you were such a traditionalist, Damocles, I would have specified that my exhaust valve clearances were 0.0015 Indian Jow, or 0.026445 of an Aṅgula. These measurements (probably) going all the way back to the Harappan Civilization in the Indus Valley (circa 3300 BCE to 1300 BCE) would supersede the other more "modern" systems you mentioned.

Barleycorns? Cubits? Keep your new-fangled high-falutin' fancy-pants measurements! If it was good enough for the creators of the good ol' Proto-Indo-European language, it's good enough for me!
 

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Oh no! Let us not besmirch the barleycorn! It is so handy to keep three of them in your pocket and, from there, you have the basis for the entire SAE system of length. And everyone has a cubit already attached and it is a foot and a half, half a yard, or 54 barleycorns. Just an awesome unit.

Everyone has a yard, too, but a meter is 9% out of reach just beyond your fingertips!

Have you tried to keep a meter in your pocket? Even a paper meter from Ikea is a bit bulky. Not so with barleycorns.

In a pinch, they are quite tasty, too.

@Skook, yes, I made the videos. Glad you found them of some use. Due to my monotonic, rambling vocal style, I have been compared to Bob Ross.

He's dead, you know.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Okay, everything you say might be true, but I don't think I have to point out to you that depending on the cultivar the average length of a barleycorn can vary between a mere 4 mm to a whopping 15 mm. However, we can assume that it wouldn't be impossible to obtain a few grains of "bere" barley, currently one of the most ancient cultivars still in production (in Orkney, Scotland) which has an average length of 8.8 mm (that would be 69/200" for you pdwestman).

Meaning of course the the valve clearance specs for a 2008 klr are 0.018 to 0.03 barleycorns for the exhaust, and 0.012 to 0.024 barleycorns for the intake.

I guess I'll be reinscribing the leaves on my feeler gauge tonight.

Apparently barleycorns are still in common usage for shoe size in English speaking countries. 12 inches is considered the largest shoe size and it counts up and down in barleycorns from there. That's a statement, not a fact.

I assume the comparison with was with pre-mortem Bob Ross. I remember finding your voice very calming, which is what you want when you are opening up a carburetor for the first time. It made me feel like "Hey, it's okay, if this guy can do it I can too".
 

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Our system of torque is screwed up due to colloquial misuse of terms. We say pound-feet and foot-pounds interchangeably but it really should be pound-force-feet. It is intuitive, though, as it is essentially the force that gravity exerts on one pound of mass at a lever at a point of one foot from a pivot. Easy to understand.
Yes, and 1 slug = 32.2 lbs = 14.6 kg

Jason
 

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@Skook, "I think you're going to fit in around here", Tom inserted.
 

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I like the slug. It's useful in the same way that the stone is.

It's nice to weigh only 6 slugs.
 
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