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Due to my monotonic, rambling vocal style, I have been compared to Bob Ross.

.
Ever compared to Dick Lane?

Announced wrestling, roller derby, destruction derby, and . . . automobile and motorcycle races, all in the Los Angeles area, for YEARS! (He referred to motorcycle riders as, "drivers" in his broadcasts.)

A cartoon parody of the man, "Dick Two-Lane," announced Tom Slick's races driving the Thunderbolt Grease-Slapper in the particular segments of, "George of the Jungle."

Famous for, "Whoa, Nellie!" exclamations, has an incredibly prolific Hollywood filmography, in addition to announcing races among motorcycle "drivers."

(You're a superior announcer, compared to Dick Lane, Tom!)

We now return you to your regularly-scheduled KLR program!

:)
 

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"You are correct, it is a mass", Tom said reverently.
"I should not have associated it with weight", Tom said heavily.

Gee, but these are bad Swifties.
 

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Discussion Starter #44 (Edited)
Ouch, I just got that.

Well, I completely disassembled my carburetor again and carefully inspected everything (i. e. piddled around with it). As I expected everything was completely clean. The jets are black now because of the Pine Sol. I poked a strand of wire through each and every orifice. I carefully inspected the diaphragm for pinholes or tears; the whole nine yards.

Then I glanced at one of the illustrations in the Clymer manual (page 160, Figure 45) which had an arrow pointing to a small orifice I have never payed any interest in--the Starter Jet. I tried to squirt some carb cleaner in it but it seemed plugged. I jabbed a wire strand in it and it felt plugged. So I unplugged it (I think).

Wouldn't that cause exactly the symptoms I'm experiencing? I need the enrichener when I start the engine because it's cold and my valves are slightly out of adjustment anyway. I'm not getting the compression I need. When I pull the lever towards me, however, what I'm actually doing is increasing the air with no extra fuel--the jet's plugged. I'm essentially cutting the fuel way down in the mixture just when I want to increase it.

I won't know if I've skinned this cat until my new shims arrive, but I have every expectation it will work.
 

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Yes, the starter jet needs to be clear! This should work.
 

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I'm servicing a low mileage '08.

Cold Cranking Compression jumped from below spec of 74 psi to 93 psi Mid-spec on a '08 10,025 mile Gen 2 just yesterday. RH exhaust valve with the KACR was >.005".
Now its a 'perfectly snug' .010". And the other 3 valves are in the upper 3/4+ of specs.

The doo showed no signs of previous adjustment. The OEM spring went slack when I allowed adjustment with flywheel removed. So 1 adjustment and DONE on that overly long oem spring. I've seen worse, live. It now has an EM Doo & Torsion Spring.

The Happy Trails new gen skid plate even with my 1/4" rubber cushions had almost NOT protected the oem drain plug. There were only 2 deep scars on the underside of plate. One on the RH side of the oversized oil drain hole and one straight across the LH side of the oem drain plug itself. Would have tightened, not loosened the plug.
BUT, any harder of hit would have busted the drain boss! I'm surprised that it isn't cracked! The steel hex Head is UGLY!! I installed a low profile head plug.

And may even add THICKER rubber cushions. (Note to Dave Pelletier)

Sorry, I still don't do pics.
 

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What the jump the **** up and down is a Newton-meter, though? A Newton is a force that accelerates a kilogram at one meter per second.

- - - - - - -

Now, if'n a Newton was whatever Isaac massed, say 80Kg, and given an acceleration equal to gravity at 9.8 m/s that might make some sense.
I am loath to presume to contradict a, "KLR sage," but since some confusion between "mass" and "weight" was discussed in this thread, I offer:

More complete description of ACCELERATION units involves the descriptor, PER SECOND PER SECOND, or, PER SECOND SQUARED.
For example, not, " . . . accelerates a kilogram at one meter per second," but rather: Accelerates a kilogram at one meter per second per second.

Similarly, instead of, " . . . an acceleration equal to gravity at 9.8 m/s," rather, . . . an acceleration equal to gravity at 9.8 m/s^2 (I don't know how to superscript a number, indicating "squared," if such a notation can be made in this website font).

Summarizing, "Average acceleration, measured in units of distance per time-squared (typically, meters per second per second), is the average rate at which an object's velocity changes over a given time interval." Distance per time, (e.g., as in, meters/second) alone merely designates speed, not acceleration.

"Average acceleration, measured in units of distance per time-squared (typically, meters per second per second), is the average rate at which an object's velocity changes over a given time interval."

Proof is left as an exercise for the student.

:)
 

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"Per Second Per Second" is as about as meaningful and as accurate as "I ain't got no", in my book.

ps, Ah jeese, you edited for explanation!
 

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I am loath to presume to contradict a, "KLR sage," ...
"I'm no sage", Tom said spicily.

I have often, in the past, forgotten to add the ^2. I usually catch it when resolving the units in the equation and find I have a velocity when I should have an acceleration. In casual conversation, not so much.
 

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"Per Second Per Second" is as about as meaningful and as accurate as "I ain't got no", in my book.

ps, Ah jeese, you edited for explanation!
Actually, I only edited for, "Neatness, originality, and aptness of thought!" :)

If you unleash Google on, "per second per second," you'll see more hits than anyone might read in a lifetime.

Basically, let's say gravitational acceleration is 32 feet per second per second. This statement means, an object falling (in a vacuum) will reach a speed of 32 feet per second at the end of the first second, and . . . a speed of 64 feet per second at the end of the second second, and . . . a speed of 96 feet per second at the end of the third second . . . and so on.

For every second the object falls, its speed will increase by 32 feet per second.

One (of many!) definitions on the Internet:

----------------------------------
American: per second per second Example sentences
per second per second in American
a unit used for acceleration when the change in velocity per second is divided by the change in time, which is also in seconds: e.g., if the velocity increased from 5 meters per second to 20 meters per second in a time interval of one second, the acceleration would be 15 meters per second per second (15 m/sec./sec. or 15/m/sec.2)
Webster’s New World College Dictionary, 4th Edition. Copyright © 2010 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.
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Not the best, nor most understandable definition on the 'Net, IMHO. One of the better ones said, "Think of 'per second per second' as, 'per second (per second).'"

Truth be told: I struggle to grasp the concept, myself! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #53
How do I make sure the timing is right when I put the chain back on the cam shaft sprockets? I didn't mark them or anything, although it seems like a good idea now. It seems like it would be difficult to get it right by eyeballing it.
 

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How do I make sure the timing is right when I put the chain back on the cam shaft sprockets? I didn't mark them or anything, although it seems like a good idea now. It seems like it would be difficult to get it right by eyeballing it.
The cam chain has no compass (or perhaps, no conscience). At piston TDC (from turning engine (turn engine counterclockwise 'til "T" mark on rotor aligns with index mark on timing hole) , set cams at TDC by use of witness and index marks. Cam chain tensioner disassembled (and reset). Set cams with both sprocket arrows pointing forward, arrow end marks parallel to the top edge of the cylinder head.

45 chain links exist between exhaust cam chain sprocket arrow head (point), and intake cam shaft arrow end (dull end). Apply tension to forward segment of cam chain when installing.

All this (and lots more minutiae omitted) is in Service Manuals; hope you have a copy.

OH YES. STUFF RAGS AROUND THE CAM CHAIN TUNNEL AS YOU WORK; DON'T WANT TO DROP ANYTHING DOWN INTO THE ENGINE INNARDS.
 

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Damocles forgot to say, 'Start cam shaft installation by pulling chain slack up on the forward side of engine, then engage with the Exhaust cam arrow pointing near level or just above gasket surface.'

Well actually, he sorta' did,
"45 chain links exist between exhaust cam chain sprocket arrow head (point), and intake cam shaft arrow end (dull end). Apply tension to forward segment of cam chain when installing. " :)
 

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In case you don't have a workshop manual, attached are pics that will help with timing the camshafts.

And if in fact you don't have a workshop manual, you really should get one, especially if you plan to keep your KLR for any length of time.

Jason
 

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Damocles forgot to say, 'Start cam shaft installation by pulling chain slack up on the forward side of engine, then engage with the Exhaust cam arrow pointing near level or just above gasket surface.'

Well actually, he sorta' did,
"45 chain links exist between exhaust cam chain sprocket arrow head (point), and intake cam shaft arrow end (dull end). Apply tension to forward segment of cam chain when installing. " :)
I apologize for my, "Failure to communicate!"

 

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Sorry about the late post, I've been stalking this conversation and needed to offer explanation for the audacity of the French.
France: With a population of approximately 65.13 million people, a land area of 213,010.630385 sq miles, not counting off continent territories, and a gross GDP of 2777.54 billion US dollars in 2018. Which entitles them today, as it did when Lagrange et al. were proclaiming standards, to rule the known world in their own minds. Which reminds me of California, Population 39.75 million, GDP of $3.018 trillion gross state product as of 2018, substantially more than that of France, but I digress.
When I lived in France to learn the language before moving to Africa, a French friend politely explained to me why the French have such a self perception. He stated, "The national symbol of France is the Cock (male rooster), and as you will find anywhere in the world the Rooster is the king of his domain, be it a small pile of rubbish or a large barn yard." This in spite of the fact that any of the other animals in said place can easily squash him with an accidental misstep. (As proven by various wars and conflicts.)
There you have it, a totally complete explanation of why the metre is now the standard measure in most of the known world and not the barley corn.
Back to productive KLR parlance (Which by the way is derived from the French verb parler; to speak).
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Okay. The French national character aside. Let's come up to speed with the project at hand. Perhaps it will be as amusing to others as it is frustrating to me.

I had my valve cover off and the camshafts removed waiting for my four new valve shims to arrive. During that time I pulled my carburetor off and I think I discovered that the Starter Jet was plugged. It seemed plugged. I think I cleared it. I reassembled the carb and put it back on, giddy with the prospect of soon having a running bike.

The shims arrived yesterday. Of course one of them was totally the wrong one. I opted to leave the exhaust valves the way they were, just on the edge of being (but not being) too tight. When the replacement shim for the replacement shim comes in I will do it all again. No big deal.

I carefully reassembled the camshafts, valve cover, etc. One thing slightly concerned me. After I got the camshafts and caps back on the Clymer manual (but not the shop manual) said to turn the crankshaft backwards several times and then line up everything again. So I did, but when I did the arrows on the camshaft sprockets weren't quite parallel with the top of the engine. But the difference was so slight I thought jumping the chain one link (which would be a real pain) would throw it way off. Whatever. It's close enough.

So, I put everything back together and turned on the petcock. I have a manual petcock which I recently put on because the original vacuum operated petcock was spraying gas on my leg when I rode the bike. So I opened this petcock and soon noticed gas all over the floor of the carport. It was coming from the pink hose that runs under the seat. I drained the float bowl and I got way more gas out of it than the float bowl could possibly hold.

I don't really have a question. I just shut the petcock off and walked away to get a beer. I checked the oil level and it looked okay, so I guess it didn't dump too much gas into the crankcase. I assume the float valve malfunctioned, but I'm not really into taking the carb off again today. I'll look at it tomorrow. *sigh*
 

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Okay. The French national character aside. Let's come up to speed with the project at hand. Perhaps it will be as amusing to others as it is frustrating to me.

I had my valve cover off and the camshafts removed waiting for my four new valve shims to arrive. During that time I pulled my carburetor off and I think I discovered that the Starter Jet was plugged. It seemed plugged. I think I cleared it. I reassembled the carb and put it back on, giddy with the prospect of soon having a running bike.

The shims arrived yesterday. Of course one of them was totally the wrong one. I opted to leave the exhaust valves the way they were, just on the edge of being (but not being) too tight. When the replacement shim for the replacement shim comes in I will do it all again. No big deal.

I carefully reassembled the camshafts, valve cover, etc. One thing slightly concerned me. After I got the camshafts and caps back on the Clymer manual (but not the shop manual) said to turn the crankshaft backwards several times and then line up everything again. So I did, but when I did the arrows on the camshaft sprockets weren't quite parallel with the top of the engine. But the difference was so slight I thought jumping the chain one link (which would be a real pain) would throw it way off. Whatever. It's close enough.

So, I put everything back together and turned on the petcock. I have a manual petcock which I recently put on because the original vacuum operated petcock was spraying gas on my leg when I rode the bike. So I opened this petcock and soon noticed gas all over the floor of the carport. It was coming from the pink hose that runs under the seat. I drained the float bowl and I got way more gas out of it than the float bowl could possibly hold.

I don't really have a question. I just shut the petcock off and walked away to get a beer. I checked the oil level and it looked okay, so I guess it didn't dump too much gas into the crankcase. I assume the float valve malfunctioned, but I'm not really into taking the carb off again today. I'll look at it tomorrow. *sigh*
Here's an idea for you after you finish your beer/s. Tap on the carburetor float bowl with a screw driver handle or piece of wood. Turn the petcock on and watch for any gas overflow. If you see signs of flooding tap the float bowl again without turning off the gas. If after six or so taps the fuel continues to overflow, turn the petcock off drink another beer and wait until tomorrow to remove the carburetor.

After removing the carburetor, remove the float bowl and examine the tip of the float needle for any signs of damage. Even if it looks OK you may want to replace the needle with a new OEM one, since the carburetor is already apart. However, the source of your leak may just be a float needle that wasn't clipped to the float assembly, which is an easy fix!

Jason
 
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