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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys, I made a post awhile back concerning a few mods I'd like to do to my 2005 klr. Unfortunately, I have virtually no experience with electrical work, so I was hoping to get some advice from y'all. Ideally, I would like just my low beam to turn on when the switch is on low and the highbeam + auxillary LEDs when the switch is on high. I'm at school currently so I dont have a soldering iron but I'm willing to go out and purchase one if need be.

Materials:
- 16 Ga wire
- 12 Ga wire
- 2 bosch relays
- 2 x 27W waterproff LED lamp
- 1 x fusible link (can I get by with one or will I need 1 for headlight and 1 for auxillary light?)
- Various sizes of whatever the crimp-on connectors are called.
25A fuses (I'm fairly certain this is correct but not positive)

1. So, if my understanding is correct, the layouts are as follows:
--- Low beam ---
battery -> fuse -> relay
relay is connected to a ground, the headlight low beam, and the low handlebar switch.

--- High beam ---
battery-> fuse -> relay
Relay is then wired to both auxiliary lights, the handlebar switch, and a ground. Could I also have the actual high beam bulb wired to the same relay?

Any obvious issues with my plan? Any tips or suggestions? Also, which gauges should I use for which applications?

Thanks
Walrasaurus
 

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Your plan is pretty good, but I think you won't need the fusible link and the fuse sizes are too large.

You won't need to get into the handlebar switch, either, as you can use the existing headlight connectors as triggers.

I've got to run out for quite a while, but I'll try and build you a schematic to work off of later today.

Meanwhile, you can take a look at this circuit which is what I'm using on my Forester. Might give you some ideas. I'm using double relays; of course, you don't need to do that.



Your fuse size should be the current load divided by the voltage, rounded up to the next size ATC fuse. Your head light, for example, is ~60 watts, so 60 watts divided by 12ish volts is 5 amps. I think the next size up is 7 or 7.5 amps. That would be the fuse you want. The LEDs are a bit of an unknown as they are made in China and we can't always be sure what they mean when they say "X Watts". It's safe to assume they 'll use the biggest number they can justify, so it's probably the in;ut. Rounding to 30 watts and dividing by 12V, we get 3ish amps. I think there is a 3 amp ATC fuse, but go to a 5.

Tom
 

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Toney,

We've found that the success rte on Google Photos is pretty low. We don't know why. It might be that the URLs are so long that they get truncated. We also noted that the results from the link can work for some and not for others and that they may expire after a time.

At any rate, yours comes back as '404'.

Tom
 

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Don't want to discourage anyone from fabricating his/her own relay headlight wiring harness, but . . . TPI sells a "plug-'n'-play relay harness connecting to Battery +, then . . . OEM headlight socket, and headlights.

This circuit uses the now low-current handlebar switch power as control voltage for each of the two relays (high and low beam) involved. The auxiliary lights would need splicing into the high-beam circuit, but . . . beyond that, plug it in and you are fused and finished.

CAVEAT: I speak from the Generation 1 universe; Bob at TPI should be able to tell what's available for Generation 2, if anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hey guys, sorry I haven't been able to reply frequently. School & work have been crazy past few weeks. Weather has been awful recently and as a result I've been unable to get any work done. I am hoping to get back to y'all and take a crack at it after the holiday. Thanks for all the advice thus far.
 
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