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Discussion Starter #1
I'm still preparing to fix the '01 KLR I mentioned in the other thread I started, but I thought I'd start a new thread to make searching a little easier for future users.

I need to buy a 1/4" drive torque wrench, a cooling system pressure tester, and a set of flat feeler gauges.

Regarding the torque wrench: I'd like to get one that can handle any job I might need to do on this bike in the future that requires a torque wrench. I was reading the Clymer manual, and the range of torque values indicated for different jobs is quite large--broader than most of the torque wrenches I've seen on Amazon could cover by themselves. Can anyone recommend a single torque wrench that can handle everything I might need to do on the KLR, or as much of the work as possible? Also, do you prefer digital or analog dials? Which torque wrenches do you use and why do you like them?

Cooling system pressure tester: These come with various attachments, and the manual doesn't appear to tell me which one is required for the KLR. (I read both the general maintenance section in chapter three and the other section that goes into more detail about the cooling system.) Which attachment is required? And which testers do you guys use? I want to avoid buying anything that won't last.

Flat feeler gauges: Maybe not necessary to ask for recommendations regarding something so basic, but I'd still like to know what you guys use and if there's anything you'd avoid buying.

Thanks!
 

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Flat feeler gauges: Maybe not necessary to ask for recommendations regarding something so basic, but I'd still like to know what you guys use and if there's anything you'd avoid buying.
When I worked on cars, I used what is called "go, no go" feeler gauges. They either went or didn't.
 

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I really don't believe a torque wrench is made that can go from low inch poundage to the range of foot pounds needed to tighten some of the larger nuts, like on the crank. Especially when you consider that the lowest and highest 10-15% of a torque wrenches range are not accurate enough to be trusted and should not be used.
You will most likely need a 1/4", 3/8" and 1/2" drive. I purchased all 3 from Gearwrench and they have proven to be reliable (for me) for bikes, cars, boat motors etc. They were around $300 bucks all together several years ago. Always set them back to the lowest setting before you put them away and don't drop them.
Some of the more experienced mechanics on here will have recommendations also I'm sure.
As far as feeler gauges go... just buy a set at the local parts store and they will serve you well. Keep them oiled or they will rust.

Cheers
Jerry

Edit: I looked at my torque wrenches and they are Gearwrench models 85060, 85062, and 85066. Available cheapest I could find with a quick search on Amazon.
 

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You need a 1/2 drive foot-lb torque wrench for axle nuts and crank parts, a 3/8 drive inch-lbs for engine hardware, and a calibrated hand-arm for the rest.
 

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Purchase a feeler gauge marked in Thousands of an inch with blades from .001 to .015 inches. They are usually also marked with metric numbers. I only measure in thousands of an inch. Most service manuals have both numbers.
The Metric only gauges that I have found in the USA are too coarse of graduations. (about .002" or .051mm increments)
And I will advise Against the 'Go - No Go' feelers suggested by Toney.

The MOST important torque wrench to own (for motorcycle service) is the 1/4 inch drive / Inch Pound graduated / in about 40 - 200 inch pounds!
Lot better to guess about larger bolts & nuts than smaller, more easily stripped or twisted off, critical small hardware such as camshaft bearing cap, valve cover & camchain tensioner bolts.
Next would be 3/8 inch drive / Inch Pound graduated / in about 150 to 1000 inch pounds.
Followed by a 1/2 inch drive / Foot Pound graduated / in about 50 to 250 foot pounds.

One can simply multiply or divide by 12 to convert from inch pounds to foot pounds, as needed.
12 foot pounds x 12 = 144 Inch Pounds.
360 inch pounds / 12 = 30 Foot Pounds.
I'll recommend that you should Always use the smallest wrench that covers the application.
 

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I recently purchased a Proto 1/4" drive 40-200 in/lb wrench and I really like it. Every wrench is bench tested with printed results before they're sent out, and the head has way more clearance than a normal 3/8" drive wrench. The maximum variance on mine was less than 2%. The adjustment is a bit different from most others I used, not bad just different. I would recommend. Purchased when I realized a 3/8" wrench wouldn't fit between the cylinder head and frame for certain tasks.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Can anyone tell me if this is compatible with the KLR? The cooling system tester is the only snag at this point. There's a lot of info on whether these testers are compatible with cars, but very little on whether they'll work with motorcycles.
 

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