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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Specifically, hill climbing ergonomics on the KLR. Here is my situation:

-2022 KLR
-In the standup riding position, climbing up hills/mountains, the ergonomics of my bike is quite fatigue inducing
-The fatigue sets in on my arms and hands because I need to grip the bars and hang on as the bike climbs
-If I try to grip the tank with my knees, then my legs get tired, and my knees are too rigid to absorb bumps because they're busy gripping the tank.
-This was happening with stock bars, and still happening with 1/2" rise on the handlebars (stock bend)
-Doesn't matter if I scoot forward over the handlebars, same effect

This is not a problem with my VStrom's ergonomics. The VStrom is a lot more comfortable, while climbing in the stand up riding position.

What am I doing wrong? What do I need to change on the bike's ergonomics to help alleviate this arm/hand fatigue during long climbs off road? I don't like sitting when I'm climbing in rough terrain. Thank you in advance for any advice.
 

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2022 Pearl Lava Orange
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Well, you aren't alone here. I suspect the footpegs are too far forward on our gen 3s. I never had ergo issues on any previous bikes but this darn bike is making me question how to solve the problem. I suspect offset rear pegs would help. I'm waiting for moose to get them back in stock.
Another thing you may not want to hear is start a workout routine and incorporate a rowing machine into it. It helps a bunch for stamina while standing. I don't know your current fitness level so if you're fit than disregard.
 

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I agree with all you stated. Standing on the KLR up steep hills is basically hanging on the handlebars. If you have 2 fingers on clutch and brake then your hanging on by the other 2 fingers. I just switched from 3/4" risers to 2" Rox risers. I wanted to get the bars more forward, it helped a bit. I put lowering peg brackets on that also move back an inch. I'll be interested to see what others think. I think the tank and the tank bag make it hard to lean forward.
 

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If it's an issue on your KLR but not on your VStrom, that indicates that it's an ergonomics issue and not a "you" problem. Compare the two, and note the differences. It may be helpful to take static side-view pictures while seated and standing on both bikes. Is it peg height/location? Handlebar height/reach? Looking at side by side pictures can help you decipher what the differences are and where to make adjustments/corrections. Pictures won't help you read the amount of handlebar pullback, but that, in addition to clutch/ front brake lever position are also things to consider. Try to identify what's different from one bike to the other before throwing time and money on things which are not the problem.
 

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As Reveille noted the footpegs are too high and too far forward. The solution for us Gen1 and Gen2 guys are the JNS drop peg brackets. I understand that the Gen3 drop brackets JNS makes don't move rearward - but IIRC, I had heard a rumor that they were going to make the "drop and back" pegs....check with Tu Combs at 3D cycle. Other than that the stock bars have too much pullback, I use Renthal RC-Hi's. Lastly, bar risers aren't the answer IMO, though everyone is different but if you use them you need to get ones that don't push the bar backwards like most of the rigid ones do, use ones that pivot like the Rox Riser adjustable units. You may need to roll your bars forward and adjust your controls to suit. With the mods I've done, I have my KLR's feeling similar to a real dirtbike.......well, a fat, wide, heavy dirtbike anyhow! :ROFLMAO:

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you guys. I never thought it's possibly a footpeg positioning issue, but this makes complete sense.

The VStrom footpegs are set further back than the KLR. It's not the most comfortable position when sitting, but when standing and going uphill, it makes a HUGE difference! I just tested it today, going up a long steep hill on the VStrom while standing. Holy crap! I accelerated too and there was very little pressure on my arms and hands. I recall climbing a big mountain while standing ALL the time on the VStrom and I never got exhausted. No way I can do it on the KLR. I tried.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I agree with all you stated. Standing on the KLR up steep hills is basically hanging on the handlebars. If you have 2 fingers on clutch and brake then your hanging on by the other 2 fingers. I just switched from 3/4" risers to 2" Rox risers. I wanted to get the bars more forward, it helped a bit. I put lowering peg brackets on that also move back an inch. I'll be interested to see what others think. I think the tank and the tank bag make it hard to lean forward.
I prefer riding off road with one finger on brakes and clutch. On the KLR when the terrain is flat or downhill, it's nice. Uphill...damn! Hanging on with 4 fingers is bad enough, but like you said: hanging on with 2 or 3 fingers...after a while my forearms are toast. I've since learned to sit as much as I can while climbing the KLR but, if the terrain is rough, that's not a good solution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Lastly, bar risers aren't the answer IMO, though everyone is different but if you use them you need to get ones that don't push the bar backwards like most of the rigid ones do, use ones that pivot like the Rox Riser adjustable units. You may need to roll your bars forward and adjust your controls to suit. With the mods I've done, I have my KLR's feeling similar to a real dirtbike.......well, a fat, wide, heavy dirtbike anyhow! :ROFLMAO:

Dave
I was hoping raising the bars a bit would fix the issue but it does not, like you said. I'll try rotating my bars for now. Problem with that is clearance from the windshield/cowl fairing at full lock. I'll give it a try. At least now I have a starting point.

The search for foot peg brackets that move them backwards, begins.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Another thing you may not want to hear is start a workout routine and incorporate a rowing machine into it. It helps a bunch for stamina while standing. I don't know your current fitness level so if you're fit than disregard.
I'm pretty fit. I do a lot of weights regularly. And I do agree with you regardless of ergo issues, being fit while riding, and especially riding off road, helps A LOT! I use up every damn muscle while riding off road!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Moving Handlebar position got me thinking. It is possible to flip the lower handlebar mounts to position the bars farther forward. It's easier to just rotate the bars but this is more elegant but more work involved.

Untitled by rogue_biker, on Flickr
 

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Might help. I'm running a vstream medium with windscreen risers and if I move the bars too far forward, my handguards contact the screen. Fix one issue and another bites me. Such as life.
Hey, I made fish tacos for dinner and they were awesome so I've got that going for me! Fish I caught too, walleye and crappie.
 

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Bodies are different. For me, arm strength ( or lack of) and leaning forward far enough to the sweet spot. I don't hug the tank with my legs, just lean onto it. I do have lowered peg mounts and a bar riser. When I'm tired it's a struggle.
I love fish tacos. We have lots of Coho right now.
 

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It is possible to flip the lower handlebar mounts to position the bars farther forward.
Yes, those can be reversed. (Dependant on other issues or modifications like Bark busters installed.)

(Well, maybe I should say on real dirt bikes they can be reversed. I haven't seen the clearance on a 2022 yet, cause I haven't even seen a 2022 in 'real steel' yet!
I keep hoping that a 2022 will ride in off of the WY BDR route, I've a lot of other bikes.
Sold several inner tubes, mounted a few tires.)
 
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Here's some homework for you -set both bikes up vertically on flat ground, take a picture of each from the side and print it on A4 paper, then get a tape measure & spirit level and start measuring - the horizontal distance from pegs to that bit between the seat & tanks where you lock your legs in & the handlebars, then the vertical distances of the same. Then mark them on your photos and compare.
Generally, you would move the handlebars forwards for standing, but risers move them back - hence the use of rotating risers. The KLR, the new one even more so than the '08+, is a sit-down & tour bike set up from the factory, so many of us need adjustments and modifications.
 

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Moving Handlebar position got me thinking. It is possible to flip the lower handlebar mounts to position the bars farther forward. It's easier to just rotate the bars but this is more elegant but more work involved.

Untitled by rogue_biker, on Flickr
I did this and it made a huge difference. It’s amazing how such a small adjustment can make such a big difference. They are rubber mounted, remove the 4 bolts on the top of the clamps that clamp on the bars then give them a twist. No need to remove the lower bolt. I also rotated the bars until the bark busters were 1/8” from plastic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have not flipped the lower bar clamps yet. But just to test, I rotated my handlebars about +1 degree from the Neutral position. I climbed a few hills in my neighborhood while standing. Indeed, it made a noticeable difference! No it's not perfect, but I can quickly tell I'm no longer hanging on to the grips if I move my upper body slightly forward. I could not rotate the bars further due to the hand guard making contact with the instrument cluster. I can probably rotate another half a degree between +1 & +2.

When I find the time I will flip those lower bar clamps.
 

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I have not flipped the lower bar clamps yet. But just to test, I rotated my handlebars about +1 degree from the Neutral position. I climbed a few hills in my neighborhood while standing. Indeed, it made a noticeable difference! No it's not perfect, but I can quickly tell I'm no longer hanging on to the grips if I move my upper body slightly forward. I could not rotate the bars further due to the hand guard making contact with the instrument cluster. I can probably rotate another half a degree between +1 & +2.

When I find the time I will flip those lower bar clamps.
If contact with the instrument cluster is the limiting factor in how far forward you can tilt the bars, won't flipping the lower bar clamps move the bottom of the bar forward but force you to tilt it further back, leaving you with the same relative hand position but with bar ends/grips pointing more at the ground?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
If contact with the instrument cluster is the limiting factor in how far forward you can tilt the bars, won't flipping the lower bar clamps move the bottom of the bar forward but force you to tilt it further back, leaving you with the same relative hand position but with bar ends/grips pointing more at the ground?
I believe it should. I haven't tried it because quite frankly, I'm too damn lazy at the moment. And if it didn't give me the clearance enough to make a difference it would really ruin my mood! All that extra work with only marginal gains would piss me off. But I will try anyway.
 
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