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Hi All,
Just got myself a new '99 KLR (A13) with 3k miles and have already found a few concerns, hoping you guys can suggest some tests or areas to investigate so I can avoid taking it to a professional.

- engine bogs when i crack the throttle. this happens in neutral and while shifting gears (either stalls or rebounds depending on how i flutter the throttle)
-front brake sticks at the handle (will bleed tomorrow)
- No tail light (running) but front and rear brake switches function properly
-No head light (hi nor low) checked switch and cleaned contacts, will check the fuse tomorrow. After cleaning the headlight switch, i reassembled switch and now my turn signals won't blink when fired, they stay illuminated.
 

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How does a person average 187.5 miles per year for 16 years? Amazing. Looks like you have a bike that just needs a little tlc. Clean the carb, probably replace stock jets. Debug the electrical and ride. I suppose the tires are original as well. Might want to change them for new.

Video of carb overhaul

http://www.klrforum.com/how-tos-tech-guides/19026-carb-overhaul.html
 

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What Vinnie said.

Hibernation sickness.

A wire likely got pinched upon reassembly.

If the ride was stored outdoors especially the whole thing needs
gone over for dryrotted vac-lines, tire condition, corroded
switches (NP, scuff w/ wire brush), and lube everything.
Throttle n' clutch cables, choke cable is under the tank and probably fine,
see if the balancer chain tensioner upgrade has been done, just a
general checkup and physical. Don't see much reason it won't wail quite soon.
 

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...As I told you "elsewhere";

- bogging is likely the carb; take it off and clean it thoroughly including all jets and passages. Careful of the plastic enricher nut and the carb diaphragm.

- front brake sticking at the lever is probably the lever/mounting bolt. Remove, clean, grease.

- headlight is probably the fuse under the seat; use a 15amp this time around.

....I'll let others chime in about the other electrical issues; not my forte.

As far as the mileage goes, I just purchased a 2000 model this spring with 578 miles on it. At first is wouldn't run off idle but I got lucky and it cleared itself out. I still went through the carb when I installed the KLX kit though.
The only other items that demanded attention were the battery and tires (which were still like new but dry rotted). A new AntiGravity LiFePo battery and a D606 rear and MT21 front and it worked like a champ.

Cheers,
Dave

 

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No tail light; could be on the headlight fused circuit; could be the tail light/brake light bulb (has two filaments).

Carb could have diaphragm air leak; hole/tear in diaphragm fabric, improper seating around periphery.

Wiring diagram on 'Net; Google, "KLR650 Wiring Diagram," look for the Generation 1 edition. A multimeter is your friend.

+ 1 on the 15-amp replacement headlight fuse.
 

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On the Gen1 bikes the headlight switch can activate BOTH high and low beam circuits at the same time as you move the switch from low to high or low to high. The extra power draw when both beams are on can pop the factory fuse even though there is no short or fault. A higher amp fuse prevents this inadvertent fuse failure. You don't want to go with too big of fuse just in case there is a REAL short in the wiring though!
Regards....justjeff
 

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+ 1!

Don't think going from 10-amp to 15-amp headlight fuse is especially radical. Kawasaki upgraded the fan fuses from 10-amp to 15-amp on Generation 2s, so--upgraded fuses are not without precedent.

On the other hand, thousands of miles of service with an OEM fuse are not impossible or necessarily, even unlikely. Regardless, a 15-amp fuse or two as spares might come in handy some day.
 

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On the Gen1 bikes the headlight switch can activate BOTH high and low beam circuits at the same time as you move the switch from low to high or low to high. The extra power draw when both beams are on can pop the factory fuse even though there is no short or fault. A higher amp fuse prevents this inadvertent fuse failure. You don't want to go with too big of fuse just in case there is a REAL short in the wiring though!
Regards....justjeff
I see. I thought fuse sizes were selected to protect the wire and a larger fuse would allow an over load to take out the wire instead of the fuse.
 

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Technically that is true, the fuse can be sized for the maximum continuous load capability of the wire but often the fuse is sized to be just above the load of the accessory instead. The wire may be oversize and capable of a higher load due to other reasons such as mechanical durability or economics. KTM has been criticized for using too light of wire in their harnesses and having wiring issues related to vibration and wear.
JJ
 

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Originally posted by justjeff:
Technically that is true, the fuse can be sized for the maximum continuous load capability of the wire but often the fuse is sized to be just above the load of the accessory instead. The wire may be oversize and capable of a higher load due to other reasons such as mechanical durability or economics. KTM has been criticized for using too light of wire in their harnesses and having wiring issues related to vibration and wear.
I see. I thought fuse sizes were selected to protect the wire and a larger fuse would allow an over load to take out the wire instead of the fuse.
Rarely, I think, is the wire fused to the limit of its current-carrying capability.

For example, chassis wiring appears to be about the same gauge throughout the wiring harness, generally, to me. Yet the same gauge wires may be fused at 10 amps (Generation 1 OEM fan and headlight circuitry) and at 20 amps (the BROWN + 12 VDC wiring).

Fusing just beyond the budgeted maximum expected current draw, as mentioned above by justjeff, might be the strategy, rather than fusing at the maximum wire current-carrying margin.
 

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Yep X3 to the well thought out responses by justjeff and Damocles

I've replaced the 10 amp fuse on my Gen1 several times before swapping to a 15 but my long term "fix" is to install one of Idabikers' new 14amp LED replacement H4's that will be available soon. 1200 vs. 850 lumens at 25% of the power requirements....win, win, win....(well except for the pocket book!)

Cheers,
Dave
 

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3 times I have 'fried' my 10 amp headlight fuse on my 1987 -A1.
Each time the black plastic fuse box has sustained some 'melt' damage, at the brass connector/terminal area with-in the fuse box.

Said fuse box was replaced after second melting. I would hate to see the potential box/terminal/wire damage which might be inflicted with a 15 Amp fuse installed into that circuit and then have a true wiring failure!

Maybe I ought to take others advice and change over to a newer Blade type fuse block assembly. With that said, which are the most highly recommended replacement fuse block brands/models/suppliers for the older -A or Gen1 models?
 

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3 times I have 'fried' my 10 amp headlight fuse on my 1987 -A1.
Each time the black plastic fuse box has sustained some 'melt' damage, at the brass connector/terminal area with-in the fuse box.

Said fuse box was replaced after second melting. I would hate to see the potential box/terminal/wire damage which might be inflicted with a 15 Amp fuse installed into that circuit and then have a true wiring failure!

Maybe I ought to take others advice and change over to a newer Blade type fuse block assembly. With that said, which are the most highly recommended replacement fuse block brands/models/suppliers for the older -A or Gen1 models?
I've also fried my 10 amp Gen1 fuse at least 3 times and more than once on both bikes and so far no damage to the fuse holder......I do make sure the connection is good and use a dielectric grease though.

I've thought about changing to a blade type but it's way down on my list of improvements and obviously you'll blow the 10amp blade the same as the 10amp glass if you overload it by having the switch hang up.

After this thread, I've decided that I'll switch back to the 10 amp after I upgrade to the 14watt bulb.


YMMV,

Dave
 

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Originally posted by justjeff:

Rarely, I think, is the wire fused to the limit of its current-carrying capability.

For example, chassis wiring appears to be about the same gauge throughout the wiring harness, generally, to me. Yet the same gauge wires may be fused at 10 amps (Generation 1 OEM fan and headlight circuitry) and at 20 amps (the BROWN + 12 VDC wiring).

Fusing just beyond the budgeted maximum expected current draw, as mentioned above by justjeff, might be the strategy, rather than fusing at the maximum wire current-carrying margin.
I have no problem with fusing above the load requirements especially on lighting circuits where the bulb serves as its own fuse as long as the capacity of the wire is not exceeded. I just don't know the capacity of the wire in this case.

I do believe that experience is the best teacher and it seems the experience of the group says 15 amps is good. My KLRs are gen2 so I have no experience with this.
 

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I have no problem with fusing above the load requirements especially on lighting circuits where the bulb serves as its own fuse as long as the capacity of the wire is not exceeded. I just don't know the capacity of the wire in this case.

I do believe that experience is the best teacher and it seems the experience of the group says 15 amps is good. My KLRs are gen2 so I have no experience with this.
Good point but as Damocles has opined, I believe there is the same gauge wiring used with 20 amp main fuse so it would appear that the wiring is still protected at that level. The 15 amp "upgrade" to the headlight fuse on the Gen 1 has been around for a long time.....refer to the suggestion on the old FAQ page; KLR650 FAQ


Cheers,
Dave
 

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The melting I spoke of/speak of, is minor melting of the black plastic fuse box. The black plastic clips that retain the Brass terminals. Not of the wires themselves and no corrosion on the terminals or metal fuse end caps.

Therefore, I have always suggested that the Gen 1 wire harness could be at peril of melt-down if one installed a 15 amp Fuse and a brighter 55/100 or 80/100 headlight bulb.
 

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I've also fried my 10 amp Gen1 fuse at least 3 times and more than once on both bikes and so far no damage to the fuse holder......I do make sure the connection is good and use a dielectric grease though.

I've thought about changing to a blade type but it's way down on my list of improvements and obviously you'll blow the 10amp blade the same as the 10amp glass if you overload it by having the switch hang up.

After this thread, I've decided that I'll switch back to the 10 amp after I upgrade to the 14watt bulb.


YMMV,

Dave
Hey Dave,
Do you have a link to the 14watt LED? The Idabiker LED I found over here http://www.razorsedgesoft.com/klr/LED_headlight.htm
is 36 W and $65.
 

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If you do a voltage drop test between the fuse end and the clip, it can be surprising at times.

I have voltage drop tested a Gen1 with 100 Watt headlight bulb but can't recall the numbers. Quite high enough with a 60 watt high beam to show that headlight relays are very worth while. My first Gen1 headlight with relays was as bright with engine off as others with engine running, FWIW.

I haven't done many headlight relays in the last couple of years because of the superiority of HID. Much better light output in a white spectrum and 1/2 the draw of an H4 QI.

Another type of LED is on order to try to see if the heat sink and fan is suitable. I don't like the need for a fan on the back of the bulb because of issues with dirt and water potentially disabling the bulb.

Can't find the numbers in my notes right now but voltage drop is typically close to 1-1/2 volts in the headlight circuit = headlight powered at 1-1/2 volts lower than battery voltage. Simple to measure on one's own bike. The ground circuit is typically 1/2 - 1 volt drop.



The melting I spoke of/speak of, is minor melting of the black plastic fuse box. The black plastic clips that retain the Brass terminals. Not of the wires themselves and no corrosion on the terminals or metal fuse end caps.

Therefore, I have always suggested that the Gen 1 wire harness could be at peril of melt-down if one installed a 15 amp Fuse and a brighter 55/100 or 80/100 headlight bulb.
 
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