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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
... Though I never seen a beaver, just a nutria.

Anyways, I just added a new family member last night! A 2006 KLR 650!




A little about me...

I am 6'7", that comes into play in my life all the time... got to watch for low hanging objects!

I've been riding off and on for about 20 years now. Never on the dirt though.

Just recently completed a round the US solo trip on the Triple R. 4 weeks and 9,000 miles.





Have silly adventures! (I'm the only one who was actually prepared for the solar ecplise)





Keep boxes full of stinging insects




Take pictures of said insects





Plant flowers for said insects...
 

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I live in the suburbs of this beautiful city (Portland, OR)



I like long walks on the beach and talking about my feelings and where the relationship is going....


Wait... Sorry, wrong forum!





Anyways... Just got the KLR, runs good so far. Broken speedo, and looks like rear running lights are out. But overall in great shape! I've never ridden off road, but after my last motorcycle adventure, I want to hit the western BDR for my next big adventure. Will be about 3-4 years down the road before I get the time off again. So plenty of time to practice on the multitude of backcountry roads.


So just wanted to say high to everyone before I crawl back into my lurker cave!

HI EVERYONE!




Oh, and this:

Gozilla, pizza, pumpkin pie, and star wars legos... sigh :)
 

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Being clearance challenged you may want to take a look at the following additions:

Handlebar, Risers 30mm - Tusk P/N 1274820002

Foot Pegs, Lowering Brackets - JNS Engineering

Shift Lever (Extended) - IMS P/N 313117

The Handlebar Risers are kind of a no brainer.

I found that the JNS Engineering Foot Peg Lowering Brackets have several advantages. What is actually kind of important is that they move the Foot Peg Back "and" Down. They do this without compromising any ground clearance (unlike some other options) and they also bring the Brake Pedal into perfect vertical and horizontal position for my size 12's.

The extended shift Lever gives better room for the toe of my boot.

The suspension can also be changed to raise the bike. Although I've not found that necessary, you might want to look into that. Folks make a variety of Dog-Bone Links for the Rear Suspension mechanism and options with the front forks are low cost and nearly endless.
 

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Google URLs are usually a problem on the forum. They don't seem to be stable (yours show up as a 404 now or a blank image) and they are often too long. And you have to keep opening them in a new tab until you get to a pure image without a lot of Google baggage.

Fore example, this is one of your Google URLs: ht tps:/ /lh3.googleusercontent.com/Qi2elSNbr9LnPP12Z49qh7PZxkZ6-88pADQLQMEiO4SUtKKP2q60t6OXZ0gBMHk8DwGtg3GF30E_JDMpzNt3jfDGMVjXHUGn-tRbh4_2gUdanFIq5H_lrk1cX1_ZfCT4MXJPJwS9ncMVK65PtnEEgjD16O8kAvwTResNn6oRxAKqw-_S-woMmWbCwB4sMj3RH2igQT2M-CAWgXHUVySRJ0d7KyKV4M8UL1ih69pcARFkyrYAEOHz1Kzs127VZLHYyANjkDHbROdwa7MYBUbwInnCjwQhriMU4P4tZkVTdDsr3qckAUzp7ejwdu31zNCvvYw5SsaO5qYSO-laKbJV-VSIP__O9oBZRySZtfXokWWHQIKpUGs-J5ucrFtPsbAH8TSBMhFOQT2KwY5QAcRJxN_Ek4zBbwetVxdPE_7sTCmhpks5kRKrB4MMBu4r_kPqXclD11ilyOU6SJnGmSqvmxEwqfjmbk7kxzmUA2qZP1A_YCbtMzicuM9zqnPuRNvZ01JYOyYcrxbQdhQvVOugWKQLyvG5pZj8U_AIBEU-dd8XdVf2XlCgC4lURBPeO44=s1378-w1378-h1033-no

There's no way the forum software can handle that and I can't begin to fix it. It doesn't even end with a '.jpg'.

In contrast, here is flickr URL: ht tps:/ /farm5.staticflickr.com/4730/27711661859_3d21f9f15a_b.jpg

Recommend you get a new image host or find a way to shorten the Google URLs, once you've clicked your way to a pure .jpg URL..
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi @Tom,

Fixed. Used Flickr

Hi @Bluehighways,

The previous owner was tall like me. The bike at rest comes up to by crotch, which is odd feeling having never ridden a bike so tall. He has a 4-in riser on the bars. The pegs feel comfortable right now, so not worried about that.

I took a look at the rear brake light. Some aftermarket LED light in there. Looks like a wire broke off the PCB board, probably the running lights power. Re-soldering it should hopefully fix it, but it is going to be a little cramped and short on wire. Don't seem to be able to figure out how to get the seat off at the moment...
 

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Don't seem to be able to figure out how to get the seat off at the moment...
Remove the side covers (2 screws each) and you'll find the seat attachment bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I managed to fix the brake light. A simple resolder of the wire and all is good.

Ordered myself some of those cheap $18 folding mirrors today.

Have both the FSM and the Clymer repair manual ordered.

I do think the brakes need to be upgraded. They are definitely softer than I am used to. My brief research suggest the SV650 brakes is the best upgrade route, but I haven't found a thread on how to do that exactly yet. (looks like I need to go to KLR650.net for the guide)

I do not know if the doohicky thing has been replaced, but given the age of the bike. I would say it is either replaced, or the bike doesn't have a problem with it. Interested in the thermobob, but haven't really ridden the bike more than a couple of miles in town.

The bike already has a seat concepts seat, and all the armored plates (skid, side, brake guards, etc.)

Looking at the Tusk LED handguard turn signals. Do I need a resistor to get them to work right?

Any option for converting the front headlight to LED?

Thanks for the help!
 

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With the exception of the Headlight I converted all lights to LED's. I've not yet found a Headlight LED that is: Effective, Cost Competitive and for which there is a functioning Headlight Modulator. Total system draw, which includes maintaining the battery state of charge runs consistently between 5 and 6 amperes.

If it helps, here's what I've used:

Headlight Modulator - Signal Dynamics: 1183
Brake Light Modulator - Signal Dynamics: 01004

License Plate LED Module - BikeMaster: 102084-03 (picture attached)

Rear Stop/Run - superbrightleds.com: 1157-CW27-T
I.P. Illumination - superbrightleds.com: 194-CWHP5-PC
I.P Idiot Lights - superbrightleds.com:
Blue: 24-BHP
Red: 24-RHP
Amber: 24-AHP
Green: 24-GHP
Turn Signal - superbrightleds.com: 1156-W26-CBT

LED Turn Signal Flasher - Amazon.com: No Part Number($2.48)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Here is the newest, complete, properly focused Gen 1 LED headlight.
(Can't even quote a URL)



I saw that, is it better than the stock, or would you recommend a different headlight? I am thinking of getting the handguards with integrated turn signals and putting on some LED flood lights where the original turn signals are.

Also, can someone recommend a good set of tires? The tires currently on the bike are mostly street. But I still need to ride the freeway about 30 miles to get to the nearest off road. Since I have the other bikes, plan to mostly use this bike for off road adventures. So would a 80/20 Dirt/street tire be about right?
 

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Well 9 more postings and you will be allowed to post URLs. It will happen quickly, I'll help.

Look at the Kenda K761's and follow Tom Schmitz's advice. Mount the Front Tire in Reverse Rotation of the factory arrow. It will cup less on Asphalt and steer better on Gravel.
 

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If the Kenda K761's are too street oriented, look at the Kenda K764 Big Blocks. But be warned they are stiffer than necessary to install or remove. I wouldn't want to do trail side inner tube replacement.

Dave Pelletiers favorite Off-road 80/20 on-road tire combo are the Pirelli MT-21 Front with the Dunlop D606 Rear, a lot easier mounting & dis-mounting & probably a smoother riding tire.
But the D606 is a Very Loud tire on the asphalt.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If the Kenda K761's are too street oriented, look at the Kenda K764 Big Blocks. But be warned they are stiffer than necessary to install or remove. I wouldn't want to do trail side inner tube replacement.

Dave Pelletiers favorite Off-road 80/20 on-road tire combo are the Pirelli MT-21 Front with the Dunlop D606 Rear, a lot easier mounting & dis-mounting & probably a smoother riding tire.
But the D606 is a Very Loud tire on the asphalt.
From my research I am sort of leaning this way. Easier on and off will be nice for me as I've never changed a tire myself. But would like to. I am also looking at the Shinko 804/805. Reviews seem good, maybe they last longer than the Dunlop is the impression I get. They are priced relatively the same.

So many things I am looking at... LED bulbs, over sized front brake rotor, SS front brake line, dirt tires, and front fork brace. Need tools, is there a good thread on tools needed for the KLR? I've seen the tool tube mod.

Need to check for low profile oil drain plug, rim locks, doohickey and spark arrestor.

So much distracting fun! But also going to add up to a lot of $$$
 

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Do Not use the TUSK brand magnetic oil drain plug, they've been known to split / crack radially from the 6 point allen socket points!

No Need for rim locks, one really should stay above 18 psi in the front tire of a KLR650 due to the weight of a KLR650! We don't want rim dents!
The rear rim is shaped like a tubeless rim, so a tubeless capable tire 'Snaps On' & the inner face of the rim bead is serrated for bead traction. 16 psi is low enough on the rear, again due to KLR weight.

Leo Vince muffler never needs packing, it uses internal baffles only. And not overly loud.
 

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The K761 is about a 10K mile tire on the rear, twice that on the front.

The mods you're contemplating are all good, but the KLR doesn't need rim locks. It doesn't have enough power to spin a tire on the rim unless you're running extremely low pressures and are in way over the KLR's head. I suppose you could, technically, spin a front with hard braking but I have never seen that. You'd have to be way too low on tire pressure.

The stock muffler has a spark arrestor built in.

We had a tool thread someplace. Maybe three or four of them. Bottom line is that the only tools that are of much use/can be of much use from the stock tool kit is the spark plug wrench and the wrench for the axle nuts. The wrench for the rear nut is actually a torque wrench. If the axle nut is torqued to factory specs the wrench will bend when you try to take the nut off. That's how you know it is torqued to spec. If you torque it to about 15 pounds less than spec (perfectly fine) that wrench is useful. All the other pieces are better replaced by sockets. Well, the screwdriver is a good piece, as it is JIS and works better than a Philips on the JIS screw heads.

An oft-repeated maxim is that your on-the-bike tool kit should be what you would use for routine and normal maintenance that you'd expect to do while not in your garage. Your riding determines what that would be but should include, at the very least, checking fastener tightness, chain adjustment, adding oil, replacing a clutch cable, removing body panels and seat, adding water to the battery, and replacing an air filter. You don't need to carry enough to rebuild the bike. Of course, there are other items that are good to carry, such as a bit of duct tape, some bailing wire, a couple of common screws and nuts, that sort of thing. Tire tools, a patch kit, a spare front tube and a pump are all good to carry. It's also good to carry a pint of oil, as KLRs tend to use a bit of oil when they run over 5K RPM.

Hopefully others may chime in with their thoughts on tools. If they do and this turns into a tool thread I'll be happy to break it out into it's own thread.
 

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Hey Kilkubli

I am only 6'6" 290 and I do off road on my '06 KLR - some pretty gnarly stuff too.
Here is a short list of 15+ things for you to think about: LMFaceO!

- Doohickey would be #1 - gotta check it and confirm it has been taken care of. If it is not taken care of you will need the Not sure how to tell - fellas? ... If in doubt - IMHO fix it. Whole kit $138 Complete lever kit with torsion spring

- Sounds like you already have the dog bones to raise the machine so that is done.

- EM makes a fork brace that you might consider as us normal sized people tend to twist the forks when off-roading. Fork brace for KLR650, 2007 and earlier (back to 1987)

- His Thru-bolt solution Drill through subframe upgrade kit IMHO would be a good idea as well. I drove the caliper bleed screw through my pretty aluminum slip-on Jardine RT4 because the a-frame flexed on the attachments. (which is also the Summit industries JSP1 "Summit Industries, Inc., dba Jardine Performance Products & Doug Thorley Headers" https://www.cmtc.com/made-in-california-profile-archived/summit-industries-inc.-dba-jardine-performance-products-doug-thorley-headers) ~ I welded the hole and the thru-bolt fix removed the problem - no holes - plenty of hard and high jumps since.

- I am not a fan of lowering the pegs for off road. IMHO more clearance = better

- Is that a heavy aluminum bash plate? I welded two together as there was some definite penetrations (aka new water pump) from rocks with only 1.
- I have the happy trails engine guards which I mounted some pegs on in the event I needed "comfort" on a longer, smoother drives.

- I didn't like the thin front wheel - It broke loose once on the road and I wrecked in the middle of a group - had DOT knobbies (always) - so I re-laced a Takasago Excel front rim to the orig hub and coupled that with a Continental 110/80 b19 "Twin Duro" tire. IMHO this is the best combination for us normal people - enough grip in the slop and great grab on the asphalt.

- Brakes are a problem. A braided brake line fixed the rear. I am in the middle of a 685 rebuild (he was smoking a ton and it was time) so I added braided brake lines and will be testing an EBC 320 rotor and pads with the stock master and caliper - I can easily add the caliper of master if there still is not enough grab. I'll let you know.

- I did LED break-away turnsignals - pretty slick but I did need to add resistors to get then to work properly.

- Might consider adding a tool kit behind the front wheel in some PVC pipe if you are getting way off road. Lot-o-pics on the web about that (I put a bag behind me on the rack)

- IMO get an extra shift level - the original will break in a fall - like it is supposed - to leaving the shifting linkage intact. Bring it home and weld it back for the next fall - I have done this a half-dozen times.
- Get bigger pegs - for both driver and rider - these are IMS SuperStock Foot Pegs - love 'em!
- I cant tell if you have the rear brake master cylinder cover ... IMO get one now ~ or ~ after a fall when you break your rear caliper ...

- The carb screw upgrade stainless steel carb screws and front master cylinder screw upgrade front master cylinder screws are "really nice to have" for a total of $7 if you are getting anything from EM anyway.

- A low profile magnetic drain plug is another "nice to have" for $9 low profile magnetic drain plug

- I did the Vinton valve stem seal as a preventative measure another nice to have (if you are adjusting your won valves - all you need to do to hold the valves up is put a thin rope through the spark plug hole and turn the crank toward TDC the roape will fill the void and hold your valves in place while you make the mod. Pretty easy one at a valve adjustment - oh yeah - IMHO adjust your valves ...

- I got ride o the choke cable and installed an old-school enrichner - less to gum up and fail

- IMHO go with know quantities - Remove snorkle - drill 4 - 1" holes in your air box and get a unit filter. Uni air filter $21

- Again IMO - following proven wisdom - get the KLX needle kit and a range of jets KLX jet kit

- Lastly of the easy ones is drilling you slide for better throttle response. Modify at your own risk (but it works) plenty of guys here to help

- Eventually you are going to need to bore the cylinder. All of them go oval at the bottom - but once work hardened, bored, and honed - you could be set for 80,000 miles or more depending on how yo treat it.

I list EM first becasue he is a great guy and super easy to work with. Secondly he know his stuff and makes great fixes. You can price shop him or have all your treat arrive as described with a help desk just a call away. He personally answers the phone. There is a reason he offers all these fixes and you continually see him listed as a source. Just sayin'.

Hope it goes well!
Sherman
 

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But maybe it does ...

but the KLR doesn't need rim locks. It doesn't have enough power to spin a tire on the rim unless you're running extremely low pressures and are in way over the KLR's head. I suppose you could, technically, spin a front with hard braking but I have never seen that. You'd have to be way too low on tire pressure.
Great Post Tom!

I am going to differ with you here. When I go off road I am at 12-14 psi. The rim lock are not an impediment on the road and a great help off - yes I get way over the KLRs head. There in lies some of the fun for me.

Same with the front - I added a second lock and balanced it. ounce of prevention = a pound .... I've seen fellas on the side changing a front tube in the woods with no locks on the wheels. I just stop and help and usually the subject of "why" and "how to prevent" comes up. If it doesn't impede something else - IMHO put locks on the tires - especially if you add kenetic energy from being huge.
 
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