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Discussion Starter #1
What MUST be done?
I have a 02 w/ 25k I just got. I know the Doohicky must be visually inspected to make sure it has been replaced..(25k?)
What else?
What to watch for? I have come across things that I thought would be outlined in a sticky but perhaps I missed a list.
Some oil ring replacement?
Thanks and howdy!
cw
 

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Hi seaweaver, welcome. So you just got a bike with 25k on it, and want to know what you have to work with. You already know what you need to do for the balancer system / doohickey.

I guess I would start with fluids. Fresh oil and filter. These bikes share the engine oil with the transmission. The oil takes a beating, and requires more frequent changing than engines that have their own oil sump. Most feel 2,000 miles is stretching it. We also have a wet clutch, which means we need to avoid Energy Conserving oils. They have friction modifiers that could render your clutch useless.

I'd check the cooling system. Make sure the fan is kicking on. Locate the relay fuse. Take a peak at the coolant level and condition.

Fork oil. I'd change it. Find out what you have for fork springs in there. Fork oil gets contaminated. You can adjust the fork dive with oil and air.

Fasteners. I'd be looking over every bolt on the bike ESPECIALLY frame bolts. Some are known to shear. Usually this is from allowing them to loosen up. These bikes have a tendency to loose fasteners. We have to stay on top of that. Blue Locktite is your friend.

Check your battery. Pull the terminals off and clean them, check the battery fluid level. Some bikes will suck water out of the battery like crazy. I use a sealed battery, so not an issue. I do clean my battery terminals about every 90 days. Walking = unhappy.

Brake fluid. I change mine every year. Brake fluid will become contaminated and no longer performed as designed. This will effect your ability to stop. Stopping on demand is a high priority for me. Not optional, you'd say.

We have tube type tires. They have a tendency to leak down a bit. To get all the life out tires you can get, we gotta stay on top of air pressures.

Air filter. Clean it often. You can buy a filter specific oil or use engine oil. Just do it frequently.

Fuses can be an issue. You might want to locate them and have a few replacements.

Chain and sprockets. You need to stay on top of these. A chain that breaks can take out your engine case, butcher your ankle or wrap around the swing arm, locking up the wheel and sliding you down the road. Ask if you need information on what to look for.

That's a start, giving you a fresh start and a point of reference for future maintenance intervals. Get your post count up so you can post some pictures of the bike. We can tell by looking whether some modifications have been done or not, or point out to you if something might need attention.

And please ask questions. We have competitive helpfulness here. We base out arrogance on who gets there first with the most information.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi seaweaver, welcome. So you just got a bike with 25k on it, and want to know what you have to work with. You already know what you need to do for the balancer system / doohickey.

I guess I would start with fluids. Fresh oil and filter. These bikes share the engine oil with the transmission. The oil takes a beating, and requires more frequent changing than engines that have their own oil sump. Most feel 2,000 miles is stretching it. We also have a wet clutch, which means we need to avoid Energy Conserving oils. They have friction modifiers that could render your clutch useless.

I'd check the cooling system. Make sure the fan is kicking on. Locate the relay fuse. Take a peak at the coolant level and condition.

Fork oil. I'd change it. Find out what you have for fork springs in there. Fork oil gets contaminated. You can adjust the fork dive with oil and air.

Fasteners. I'd be looking over every bolt on the bike ESPECIALLY frame bolts. Some are known to shear. Usually this is from allowing them to loosen up. These bikes have a tendency to loose fasteners. We have to stay on top of that. Blue Locktite is your friend.

Check your battery. Pull the terminals off and clean them, check the battery fluid level. Some bikes will suck water out of the battery like crazy. I use a sealed battery, so not an issue. I do clean my battery terminals about every 90 days. Walking = unhappy.

Brake fluid. I change mine every year. Brake fluid will become contaminated and no longer performed as designed. This will effect your ability to stop. Stopping on demand is a high priority for me. Not optional, you'd say.

We have tube type tires. They have a tendency to leak down a bit. To get all the life out tires you can get, we gotta stay on top of air pressures.

Air filter. Clean it often. You can buy a filter specific oil or use engine oil. Just do it frequently.

Fuses can be an issue. You might want to locate them and have a few replacements.

Chain and sprockets. You need to stay on top of these. A chain that breaks can take out your engine case, butcher your ankle or wrap around the swing arm, locking up the wheel and sliding you down the road. Ask if you need information on what to look for.

That's a start, giving you a fresh start and a point of reference for future maintenance intervals. Get your post count up so you can post some pictures of the bike. We can tell by looking whether some modifications have been done or not, or point out to you if something might need attention.

And please ask questions. We have competitive helpfulness here. We base out arrogance on who gets there first with the most information.
Yep...That the kind of list I was looking for!
I just rode over to my brothers house to borrow a tool and he was looking the bike over and found something disturbing. The rear sprocket is lose, wobbly and appears at one time so bad that a sprocket bolt cut a notch into the rear arm. I'm going to park the bike till I can get that ( and a lift from Harbor fright) fixed. The previous owner gave me a manual on disk that I need to get opened and sort out some of these things you have mentioned.
Thanks.
cw
 

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The rear sprocket will have a bit of play, maybe a quarter inch. It has a rubber damper / bushing between the sprocket and the hub. Here is a diagram of the rear hub;

http://www.bikebandit.com/houseofmotorcycles/2004-kawasaki-motorcycle-klr650-klr650-a18/o/m3692

You might check that the spacers are on the axle in the right ordwer and location. It is easy to get them mixed up, which might give you some play where there shouldn't be any.

Not too sure about the sprocket bolt / swing arm notch thing. Pictures. Got a host site for photos, like photo bucket? I'd like to see this.
 

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Wow!

There should be no way for the rear sprocket to be wobbly enough to do that without a total rear bearing failure, accompanied by much drama, wailing, and teeth gnashing.

Nonetheless, there it is and who knows how. As vatrader says, the rear sprocket will have some play in it because it runs on a cush drive. If, when you grab the back of the sprocket, you can only wiggle it a bit, then the rear sprocket and cush drive are in good shape. Whatever it was that caused the drama must have been fixed. Could have been some trail debris got jammed in there during the last 25K miles.

My only concern would be the integrity of the swing arm. The swing arm is hollow. Arm chair diagnosis is also hollow. Can you have someone look at it that could give you an opinion as to whether or not that damage should be welded up?

When you look at it from the inside of the swing arm, is the damage only at the corner, or does it swipe across the inside of the swing arm in an arc, with a path about the size of the nuts that hold the sprocket in place?

Welcome to the forum!

Tom
 

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That is ugly. Hopefully, it is a scar from a long ago incident, and not a current issue. One thought come to mind, and I'm not real sure about the feasibility of this, but if the spacers on the rear axle were not on in order, left off, lost, etc, the sprocket may have walked out from the wheel far enough to inflict that gash. i'm echoing Tom's concern about the full amount of damage. That would not be a complicated repair, and could be done with an internal sleeve or external reinforcement. If you look at the bikebandit.com diagram link I put in that previous post, it will show you what spacers and order of installation.

Can you describe the amount of play you are getting at the sprocket? I know thats all subjective, but if you grab the sprocket from the rear of the bike, and push it left / right, what are you finding?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I'm uploading a video to youtube now. I'm not sure how good it will be as I'm shaking the camera as I'm shaking the sprocket!
There seems to be no way it can touch the arm now and therefore must be old. The arm as an inner ridge top and bottom. Both have been cut, the bottom less and the "box" not compromised so I think it is still quite strong.
I had been noticing a "KNOCK " from aft as I'm tooling around the hood and thought it was due to the chain being loose and hitting...(?) a chain plate?
The chain is loose, but when I found this loose sprocket..i started associating the knock w/ "float" rpm and the wheel catching up to the chain and ...the sprocket barking as it past the chain speed and dropped back to load.
cw
 

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I don't see anything alarming there. I would ride on what you showed us. You mentioned hearing a clunk from aft, and that clunk possibly coming from the chain. Chain tension needs to be considered.

Here is a step by step on chain adjustment:

http://germz.org/klr650/chain-tension.html


Let me clarify a few things before you get confused in our highly technical jargon.

Gen I- 1987-2007 bikes

Gen II- 2008 and newer

Drive trains are essentially the same in both versions. Brake components are not. Most mechanical input from Gen II owners will apply to your bike, and vis-a-versa.

Gen I bikes were virtually unchanged, so parts and diagrams are the same. If you see a part or diagram for an '06 or '98, its all the same beast. There were some internal changes along the way, but for visible, maintenance type stuff, its the same 'ol same 'ol.
 
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