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Discussion Starter #1
My stubbies are as bald as I am :)
Ordered some 705s and new tubes.
Also ordered a new chain and sprockets.

Was gonna do the work myself, but unfortunately don't have a motorcycle stand.
Also getting the sprocket off is kinda tricky with just a single person doing it, so I just wanted to see if there was anyone out there in my area who would be willing to help a fellow KLR owner out for a few beers and a few dollars (I'm in SW CO, Littleton to be exact).

I purchased the Motion Pro chain breaker kit. Got a Harbor Freight torquer.
I think I have all the tools needed except for a stand. (Still waiting on the tubes, which'll probably be here in a few days.)

Is there any way to change tires without a lift? Should I just splurge on one? I see one on Amazon for $45 which isn't too bad.
Any suggestions would be great.
 

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2008 KLR650
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Welcome to the forum. I'm a newcomer myself.
Harbor freight motorcycle lift at 20% off is 80 bucks well spent.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Welcome to the forum. I'm a newcomer myself.
Harbor freight motorcycle lift at 20% off is 80 bucks well spent.
Yeah, that's what I'm leaning toward.
There's an HF a couple miles away; might just pick one up here soon before my tubes arrive.
 

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Nice on the bike lifty thing.

I just did the new tires, sprocks and chain on mine a few weeks ago. Smoother and quieter, I am sure they were the originals from 09' and for sure had not been maintained. Enjoy the results.
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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Good job. Some years ago I bought a motorcycle lift for my Harley that was similar, but was made of stainless steel tubes. The main differences: (1) it was narrower under the bike, about 15”—wide enough to provide a stable base but not excessively wide; (2) the lever arm was 90 degrees different from yours, so that you lever the arm from vertical DOWN to the floor; (3) when the arm is down on the floor, the bridge under the frame is about 15 degrees past center, like a center stand works. That kept the arm pressed down on the ground and out of the way. (4) it comes apart in sections so it can be stowed on the bike for on the road use.

Here are some online links:


And I haven’t seen this lift before, but it looks like a really good solution for the home motorcycle shop:

 

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Discussion Starter #7
I built my own stand based on one I saw online.

There are plans for another style lift at Marknet:

Pardon my ignorance, but how do you get the bike propped on the wood like that?
Is that vertical piece used as some kind of lever arm?
Seems like it would break will trying cranking it from horizontal to vertical.

Also, your link isn't working for me.

I'm leaning toward just getting a HF one.
Waiting for some 20%+ coupon to show up, hopefully soon.
 

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If you have access to a tree nearby i use a hoist with a rope attached to a branch. Or you can use your garage ceiling.
28894
 

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I built one of the wood lifts like posted above prior to buying my HF lift. Hands down the HF lift is the better bet. I use it for my KLR and my HD Road King for tire changes, chain cleaning, etc. Spend the less than $100 and enjoy the benefits of the hydraulic lift.
 

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'12 Candy Lime KLR
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Pardon my ignorance, but how do you get the bike propped on the wood like that?
Lay the lift under the bike. Position the block so that when rotated up, it will meet the bottom of the frame. Stick a 3-4ft long 2x4 into the slot on the end of the lift. The 2x4 will be horizontal to the ground. You can orient the 2x4 towards the front or rear of the bike.

Grab the end of the 2x4 with one hand and lift it so the block meets the frame. The block will be at about a 45 degree angle. Grab the handle bar with your other hand to steady the bike. Pull the 2x4 up the rest of the way so it's vertical (and the bike will be off the ground and resting on the block).



Is that vertical piece used as some kind of lever arm?
Exactly.


Seems like it would break will trying cranking it from horizontal to vertical.
Nope, no problem. The 2x4 never even creaked.


Also, your link isn't working for me.
Correct link: MarkNet - KLR650



I'm leaning toward just getting a HF one.
I agree. I built the wood lift because I needed to do some maintenance on the chain urgently and didn't have a "real" lift. It worked great.

When I had the opportunity, I went out and bought the lift from HF. It is more stable and doesn't require the gymnastics that my home-built lift does.


Waiting for some 20%+ coupon to show up, hopefully soon.
Look online. I found a 20% off coupon. Final price was $80.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Thanks for all the tips everyone.

Here are the parts/tools that I have so far. I think I have everything, but if I'm missing something, please let me know.


28902
28903
28904


Aside from that main sprocket, I got a rear one with 16 teeth, so that the bike can stretch its legs a bit on the freeway. (I do most of my riding on the road anyway.)

Like I said, I think I have just about everything. Tube's are coming in the next few days.
Still need what? Trail Jack or Lift, maybe another spoon/tire iron or two? Can't think of anything else right now.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Is there some kind of lubricant/sealer I need for the tires? I haven't changed these since I bought the bike a year ago. I know you use sealant for tubeless, but what about ones with the tube?

Also, what's a good grease to use on the chain? I have some cheap, Walmart-brand stuff that I use on my bicycle, but think I might need something better for my bike.
 

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I'd like to hear what others say, but I don't use "Slime" or any similar sealer in my tubes. I always carry my patch kit and a tire pump for the inevitable flat tire(s).

Good luck with you tire installation adventure - it gets easier as you develop your technique through pain and practice. I use some dish soap with water as tire lube - lots of it. After getting one side of the tire onto the rim, I pat baby powder on the tube, and then put a little more baby powder into the tire and spread that around the inside. After getting the valve seated and inflating the tire a wee bit, I spoon the other side onto the rim with lots of lube and "many small bites". It helps if the new tire is warm and stretchy, so I like to leave it out in the sun for a little bit, if I can.

Any discussion of chain lube is bound to get a variety of input, but I use WD-40 for my chain almost exclusively - it's a good solvent for washing the grit out of my chain, not too messy, and it's fairly cheap.
 

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Watch this tire change video:


I'll add:

The tire paste/lube is nice, but soap works good too. I've even heard of people using WD40. But that is more work to clean up.

KLR does not have a rim lock, so easier yet. (Note the guy is not breathing heavy!!)

Once you get the tire off, in addition to the inspection, clean the rim good to remove any crusty stuff that will inhibit the tire from sliding onto the rim and seating the bead. Wire brush works good for that.

Tires have concentric circles cast into the tire next to the bead. Made sure you see all of the rings when you think you have the tire seated. If you don't, you don't have the bead seated all the way around.

I use all of the Motion Pro tools mentioned. Good stuff.

I don't have a stand, I use a 5 gallon bucket. My back is telling me I need a stand though!!!(LOL)
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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That video was way too easy. I’ve had to use c-clamps and big vise grips to keep the tire beads in the center of the wheel, and work hard at it. I guess some tires fit a little looser than others, and that makes a significant difference. It seems most of mine are tight. And my beads don’t seat that easily either. The last time I changed the rear tire, I had to run it up to 60 psi to get the bead on one side to pop out. And yes, I soaped it up pretty well. Maybe the bead paste he uses helps there too.

One interesting point, he said to not screw the nut on the stem down to the rim, but to back it up against the cap. I’ll have to try that, although I haven’t torn an inner tube yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
That video was way too easy. I’ve had to use c-clamps and big vise grips to keep the tire beads in the center of the wheel, and work hard at it. I guess some tires fit a little looser than others, and that makes a significant difference.
I was gonna ask about this. I'll probably need to buy some C-Clamps as well to break the seal.
I've also seen videos of people just leaning their bike/kick stand on the tire to break the seal.
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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The C-clamp isn’t to break the bead, although it helps with that chore too. It’s to keep the bead of the tire off the bead-bump on the rim so that you can get the levers into the opposite side of the tire.
 

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I guess some tires fit a little looser than others, and that makes a significant difference. It seems most of mine are tight.
Dirt bike rims are true tube type rims. (Easy-Peasey)

The rear KLR rim has the Tubeless safety rib on it. So a tubeless capable rear tire actually 'Snaps over' the safety rib like a true tubeless set-up would. Makes the tire more likely to stay 'beaded' on the rim in the event of a flat at speed.

But they can be a real bear to un-seat the tire beads with simple tire irons along side the road or trail.
 

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One interesting point, he said to not screw the nut on the stem down to the rim, but to back it up against the cap. I’ll have to try that, although I haven’t torn an inner tube yet.
I learned to do that when I was a kid. Probably read it in Dirt Bike Mag!

Another thing I use is the metal sealing valve stem caps. Extra layer of protection if you happen to get a valve core that leaks.
 
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