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Whats going on everyone, I just bought a 2009 (VIN 24000+) with 12k miles on it as my first bike. I’ve been doing some basic maintenance, changed the oil, air filter, checked brake pads, bought the thermo bob... But as I’m not even licensed yet and the DMV makes you wait a month for appointments, I’m wondering if I should do some more thorough checks in my spare time before I’m legally on the road. I don’t have much mechanical experience but I’m pretty capable and willing to learn (the hard or easy way).

I’m the third owner and the guy I bought her from said the first owner claimed he did the doohickey. My thinking is that she wouldn’t make it to 12k miles without having it done, is that fair?

Next, I’ve heard of the deep hole problem on new 2009’s, I’m guessing mine is okay with a VIN over 24000?

Being that its my first bike period, pretty much any tips are welcome! Maintenance, adjustments, things to check, literally any advice is appreciated here...
 

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Eagle Mike would have included the Deep Hole spacer for the starter cluster gear if the Doo-Hickey had been purchased from him in about 2010 or later.

I'll suggest that it might be a good thing to dis-assemble & regrease the entire rear suspension needle bearings & plug those to stupid holes that let water into the lower rocker arm bolt and corrode them in, before things actually do get corroded in.

You could also dis-assemble & regrease the steering bearings. Owners used to blame the "Asian Grease Shortage".
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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Welcome, and first of all, read this:


Do you have a Clymer manual yet? If not, buy one before you do anything else. Trust me, learning the easy way is much cheaper and faster than learning the hard way!

Re adding zerk fittings to the frame tube—Tom Schmitz recently discovered that pumping grease into this tube ends up pushing grease up into the frame rails. Just seal up the holes instead. Maybe Tom will jump in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just got the Clymer the other day since I knew I want to work on it myself. For the most part the bike looks in great shape, I think the original owner kept good care... I have my doubts about the guy I bought it from, but also no reason to think it was mistreated. Excited to start riding for sure
 

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I have the zerk fittings on the suspension bits. It is a great convenience to do once-a-year maintenance by simply squirting a bit of grease into the swing-arm pivots and into the knuckle linkage and its bits. I will say, though, that I don't think the convenience is worth the effort.

Better is to disassemble the whole mess and grease it up properly. When installing the pivot for the linkage and the swingarm, grease them well. For the linkage pivot, once it is installed, stick the nozzle tube of a can of chain lube into each of the two holes and spray a fog of lube into the cavity. Turn the pivot bolt `80* and to it again. This replaces any of the grease that was wiped off and protects the pivot bolt from rust. Put a bit of electrical tape over each of the two holes and shmear a bit of RTV across the tape to hold it in place.

That's the best job you can do and the stuff won't rust. Every now and again you should take down the rear suspension and re-lube it.

You can look this over; it has pictures.
 
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I have the zerk fittings on the suspension bits. It is a great convenience to do once-a-year maintenance by simply squirting a bit of grease into the swing-arm pivots and into the knuckle linkage and its bits. I will say, though, that I don't think the convenience is worth the effort.

Better is to disassemble the whole mess and grease it up properly. When installing the pivot for the linkage and the swingarm, grease them well. For the linkage pivot, once it is installed, stick the nozzle tube of a can of chain lube into each of the two holes and spray a fog of lube into the cavity. Turn the pivot bolt `80* and to it again. This replaces any of the grease that was wiped off and protects the pivot bolt from rust. Put a bit of electrical tape over each of the two holes and shmear a bit of RTV across the tape to hold it in place.

That's the best job you can do and the stuff won't rust. Every now and again you should take down the rear suspension and re-lube it.

You can look this over; it has pictures.

And this: Swingarm Removal Problem

I need to catch my article up with what we did to @samuel's bike.
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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Just got the Clymer the other day since I knew I want to work on it myself. For the most part the bike looks in great shape, I think the original owner kept good care... I have my doubts about the guy I bought it from, but also no reason to think it was mistreated. Excited to start riding for sure
Old Bedouin wisdom: “When buying a camel, look more to the seller than to the camel.”
 

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I’m the third owner and the guy I bought her from said the first owner claimed he did the doohickey. My thinking is that she wouldn’t make it to 12k miles without having it done, is that fair?
Well . . . in my view, YES, and . . . NO.

Bayesian Probability would support your postulated premise: If it ain't failed in 12,000 miles, it ain't likely to fail now.

Yet . . . doohickey failure remains a highly random event, especially in Generation 2 (2008 and later) KLRs. Doohickey failure event may occur "like a thief in the night:" One never knows WHEN.

That said, catastrophic collateral damage from doohickey failure, not unknown in Generation 1s, remains extremely rare in Generation 2s. Weak balancer chain adjustment springs are not uncommon, but unlike, "ticking time bombs." Symptoms of excessive vibration likely occur before such springs are totally ineffective (again, in my view).

Have no data, but . . . I'd bet the vast majority of KLRs roaming the earth today (from 30-plus years of production), Generation 1s and 2s, muddle through with OEM stock doohickeys. Still, doohickey replacement, especially with Eagle Mike, "torsion springs," remain sound preventive maintenance, especially on pre-2008 models.

FULL DISCLOSURE: Have Eagle Mike doohickey and torsion spring on my Generation 1.

No help in your decision here; in a way, Clint Eastwood's line may apply: "Do you feel lucky . . . ?"
 

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Mister/Doctor/Professor: Do, I mean DO, read this!

 

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Whats going on everyone, I just bought a 2009 (VIN 24000+) with 12k miles on it as my first bike. I’ve been doing some basic maintenance, changed the oil, air filter, checked brake pads, bought the thermo bob... But as I’m not even licensed yet and the DMV makes you wait a month for appointments, I’m wondering if I should do some more thorough checks in my spare time before I’m legally on the road. I don’t have much mechanical experience but I’m pretty capable and willing to learn (the hard or easy way).

I’m the third owner and the guy I bought her from said the first owner claimed he did the doohickey. My thinking is that she wouldn’t make it to 12k miles without having it done, is that fair?

Next, I’ve heard of the deep hole problem on new 2009’s, I’m guessing mine is okay with a VIN over 24000?

Being that its my first bike period, pretty much any tips are welcome! Maintenance, adjustments, things to check, literally any advice is appreciated here...
regarding the doo and balancer system: failure resulting in catastrophic damage in the gen2 engines is pretty rare. If it happens, it's usually related to the upper rear l/h bearing failing. This is usually due to poor maintenance, but a few bearings have been bad from the factory.
Important note here: not upgrading the doo does result in more wear on the balancer sprockets, and eventually the chain. Sometimes neglect results in wear on the splines on the front weight and shaft. I'd suggest checking to see what's in there at the very least. If you want to remove the left side outer case every 7500 miles or so, you could manually adjust the doo/adjustment lever then. IMO it's a bit easier to change the doo and put in a torsion spring. I have a few instructional videos up on the tube.
If you get in there and have questions, please call. If I miss your call will call you back when I can. Number on my site.
 

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I saw watt mans write up in the zirks for the rear swing arm, do you think thats a good idea right off the bat?
If one Looks at Watt-mans last 2 pictures, one can just barely make out that he used some Clear RTV silicone on the LH hole of the Lower frame pipe (probably on the RH hole also) that is the most susceptible to corroding the bolt in.
Yet to the best of my memory or knowledge, he never mentioned anything about those 2 stupid holes.

That's a lot of work to remove the entire rear suspension system, de-grease, press out some bearings, drill & tap holes PERFECTLY positioned, re-install some bearings, re-grease manually prior to re-assemble, re-install seals, pump grease into assemblies to purge air pockets.

Most of us de-grease the assemblies prior to removing any SEALS. Remove seals & bearing sleeves, mash 2 or 3 fingerfulls of Waterproof marine grade grease into the all of the needle rollers and begin reassembly.
Either thread & Loc-Tite screws into those 2 stupid holes or a blob of RTV.
 

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Whats going on everyone, I just bought a 2009 (VIN 24000+) with 12k miles on it as my first bike. I’ve been doing some basic maintenance, changed the oil, air filter, checked brake pads, bought the thermo bob... But as I’m not even licensed yet and the DMV makes you wait a month for appointments, I’m wondering if I should do some more thorough checks in my spare time before I’m legally on the road. I don’t have much mechanical experience but I’m pretty capable and willing to learn (the hard or easy way).

I’m the third owner and the guy I bought her from said the first owner claimed he did the doohickey. My thinking is that she wouldn’t make it to 12k miles without having it done, is that fair?

Next, I’ve heard of the deep hole problem on new 2009’s, I’m guessing mine is okay with a VIN over 24000?

Being that its my first bike period, pretty much any tips are welcome! Maintenance, adjustments, things to check, literally any advice is appreciated here...
I have an 88 with 28K. Dewhicky was not done when I got it. Still ran like a beast. Probably worth a looksie.
 

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Sorry I mean I got it with 28k and it was not done. There was no indication in the way it ran
The balancer sprockets are worth inspecting, especially the left front. They are a multipart assembly, and occasionally fail. I have pictures somewhere.
The factory doo often will not adjust, and isn't a very good part. Those were used 1984-1989, the thin stamped version.
Hope you have happy miles with it.
 

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I'm gonna go out on a limb and say that shows a bit of damage, and isn't adjusting correctly.

It looks like I see witness marks on the edges of the slot. This means the engine was run with the clamping bolt loose. You can also see the oversize countersink in the threaded hold for the clamping bolt. Often the early levers like yours would get a dimple into that countersink when the bolt was tightened. The later bolt (1990/later) has a larger diameter head where is clamps the lever.
 

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There was no indication in the way it ran
I'm reasonably certain that you just weren't familiar enough with the KLR engine.

I'd think that you would have heard quite a bit of Clack, clack, clack from the engine every time it was accelerated? And the bike would 'shudder' while accelerating?
Those light weight original springs didn't have much tensioning force, but didn't seem to break the hooks off as often as the next 2 generations of oem springs.

I'll bet that that noise almost completely disappeared after installing the EM Doo Hickey & Torsion spring?
What year did you make this repair?
 

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The bolt was tight and both pieces were actually held together until i loosened it. But who knows if it was improperly adjusted prior....The spring was laying next to it. Basically, when I bought it (450$) I didn't want to put any money into it until I knew it ran. The carb was actually pretty clean so I Ran some fuel in it and it started right up, but I didn't ride it until after the doo was done, so I have no idea if it was noisy as I ran it for a short time with no load. Its funny because the guy I bought it from knew all about the doo but never did it. I have no idea the history of the bike but have been through most of it and I am surprised that's there is no dirt in the odd crevice. As of now it runs very strong and quiet. up to now Ive done:
Tank clean and seal
Carb rebuild
Doo
rear shock and suspension rebuild
front shock reseal
manual petcock
choke cable eliminate
gauge clean and repair
various lights and cyclops bulb
crash bars
cobra exhaust from CL sounds and runs awesome
tires
oil and coolant with low profile plug
chain and gears already done by PO
wiring is stock and not mutilated
shortened turn signals
lots of little things like any old bike.
doesn't use oil or smoke.

You are correct as this is my first Killer and its a learning experience which is why I bought it. But i would take it any where. Its definitely strong and using it to learn. Thanks for the tips
 
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