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Discussion Starter #1
Recently got my new to me 2001 klr650 with 3900 miles back from the shop. When I bought her she ran OK just needed to crank over awhile before she started because the gas was 5 months old. The tires were the original 01 tires that were showing their age. I took it to a shop that quoted me a good price on the phone for a tune-up, new tires and a battery tender. When I went to pick it up 4 weeks later they hand me a bill for 380.31 (parts)+19.02 (tax)+408.2 (5.8hrs labor)= 807.35 almost double the quote! New tires and a tune-up on my car doesn't cost that much! The parts they charged me for were: Float valve+clip (43.58), O-ring float chamber+drain screw (17.48), Shinko 705's (148.9), cotter pin (0.98), battery tender (39.95), battery (56.95), oil (22.47). They said that they had to rebuild my carb and replace the battery both of which they did not call me before doing. The tune up included: brake fluid flush/replace, engine oil (didn't change filter), valve adjustment, new spark plug and 2 gal. gas. I am new to motorcycling so I don't know if this a normal price to pay for this type of work or if I was "had". I am leaning towards the latter. They dropped the price to 705.02 after I asked them to work with me in the price because of the unauthorized work and incomplete tune-up (radiator fluid wasn't flushed as originally agreed). I payed them and took the bike home. As I am unloading the bike I notice the plastic skid plate is missing and a screw on the brake fluid reservoir was stripped. I called them and they said they would look into it. This was a couple of weeks ago. Should I take the bike back and ask them to replace the screw and skid plate? or should I let it slide?
I cant spend that kind of money every time I need an oil change. Which service manual is the best to get?

I welcome all feedback
 

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Get a Clymer manual and never, ever let a shop touch your bike again. I was a novice at wrenching when I got my bike and still have a lot to learn, but I have friends and am not afraid to ask Q's and it is an easy bike to work on.

Forget about whether or not you got "had". It's done. You won't ever have to pay for an oil change again. Think about it that way. Changing the oil takes five minutes.

Welcome to the club. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Lockjaw. I am very comfortable working on my cages but because it is my first bike I decided to play it safe and take it to a shop. Rookie mistake I know better now. I was checking out some youtube maintenance vids and the KLR looks like it would be an easy bike to work on. I will get a Clymer ASAP. On a different note I just picked up two 20mm ammo cans for $20 a piece that I am hoping to use as panniers. They are big, cheap and water tight. All I have to do is get the pannier racks and weld tabs for padlocks on the cans and I'll be good to go
 

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Flat-rate shop hours run close to $ 100 here in northern Virginia; for the work performed the bill isn't particularly out of line, IMHO. Regrettably high, the parts prices appear close to dealer list prices, also.

Yet, the shop owes you a skid plate and should address the screw issue, IMHO.

If you need a stock skid plate (not recommended; a more robust aluminum one preferred for any off-road riding); I have one I'll GIVE you--totally serviceable, came off my Generation 1 bike (if I can FIND it in the junk box!).

If you must go into the carb again, you can find a good primer by Googling, "Care and feeding of the CVK40." vatrader01 posted an excellent tutorial on carb tuning on this website.

All this said, if your bike is sound, you've still got a treasure! A battery and tires are expendables you MUST buy, and if the technical work is competent, you've the equivalent of a barely broken-in new bike!

Now, about the doohickey . . . doomsday, "The sky is falling!" alarmists will tell you you MUST upgrade your doohickey with an aftermarket part, or your engine will turn into a pumpkin at the stroke of midnight. While the deisgn of your Generation 1 doohickey (idler shaft lever) is questionable, such peril may be exaggerated. Not a bad idea to upgrade, plenty of videos and tutorials, do-it-yourself wise.

Bottom line; time-and-place, you weren't particularly savagely hosed; yet you're due yur skid plate and a serviceable screw (if the latter's the dealer's responsibility).

May the bad taste disappear, allowing you to enjoy your delicious bike!

----------------------

Note on that stripped (I imagine you mean, "boogered screw head," vs. stripped threads) master cylinder reservoir screw: an IMPACT DRIVER is my tool of choice for removing these screws (wiithout boogering the screw heads; JIS bits help, too). GALVANIC CORROSION causes tenacious adhesion between the steel screws and the alloy casting, 'specially on a bike sitting as long as yours has. An impact driver applies torque only when the threads are relieved by a hammer blow, freeing stubborn fasteners (about $ 10 at Harbor Freight).

You might consider replacing the screws with Allen-head fasteners (same with the carb), to avoid future trauma.
 

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May the bad taste disappear, allowing you to enjoy your delicious bike!
Exactly.. And if Lone Rider doesn't come through with his free stock skid plate, I'll give you two of them.. :) I would get that screw for the reservoir though.. You want to keep the brake fluid dry and the cap needs to be sealed tight with the needed screws.

As far as the doohickey, of the 12 that I've been a part of replacing, I've seen 4 bad ones.. 2 broken doos, 2 broken springs.. If I bought another KLR it'd be done on the day I bought it, but it's because I've done them before and it's not a big deal.. I'd also replace the sub-frame bolts, but that's me.. It's your bike and you're free to do what you wish to your bike..:)

As mentioned, grab a manual, take your time, and if you run into ANY issues, stop in and ask for help and we'll do our best to get you through it.
 

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Thanks Lockjaw. I am very comfortable working on my cages but because it is my first bike I decided to play it safe and take it to a shop.
If you're comfortable working on a car, bikes are even easier because almost everything is easier to get to.

It is up to you whether a return trip to that shop is worthwhile to get what they screwed up resolved. I've hit several shops where it simply isn't worth my level of frustration to even walk back in the door.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you guys for your input. LonerRider I may take you up on the skid plate offer just because the budget is a little tight right now so the farkles/hard parts will have to wait a bit. I will just buy a replacement screw for the reservoir but I am not sure if it will come off without a fight because the phillips head is stripped. @ LoneRider I am just an hour south of DC in fredericksburg if you are ever in the area maybe we can go for a ride and you could show me what the swiss army knife on wheels can do.:)
 

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I will just buy a replacement screw for the reservoir but I am not sure if it will come off without a fight because the phillips head is stripped.
I'm pretty sure I have a couple of the stock screws sitting around (one should even be new.) PM me your mailing address, and I'll mail them to you.
 

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Thank you guys for your input. LonerRider I may take you up on the skid plate offer just because the budget is a little tight right now so the farkles/hard parts will have to wait a bit. I will just buy a replacement screw for the reservoir but I am not sure if it will come off without a fight because the phillips head is stripped. @ LoneRider I am just an hour south of DC in fredericksburg if you are ever in the area maybe we can go for a ride and you could show me what the swiss army knife on wheels can do.:)

Welcome to the forum!

Replace the philips screws with stainless allens. Everybody strips those phillip heads, they're made of cheese... :28:
 

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Replace the philips screws with stainless allens. Everybody strips those phillip heads, they're made of cheese... :28:
True enough, unless an IMPACT DRIVER, preferably with a JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) vs. a SAE bit is used.

The SAE Phillips-head bit grips the JIS screw head a LITTLE better, if the point of the bit is dulled (for deeper penetration).

The culprit, fundamentally, appears to me to be Galvanic corrosion between the dissimilar screw and casting metals and its attendant adhesion.

IMPACT DRIVER to the rescue!

For an already-boogered screw head, a Dremel Moto-Tool cut-off wheel can cut a slot for a flat-blade screwdriver; or . . . worst case, the screw can be drilled out (I've had few miracle cures with Easy-Outs, myself).
 

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Thank you guys for your input. LonerRider I may take you up on the skid plate offer just because the budget is a little tight right now so the farkles/hard parts will have to wait a bit. I will just buy a replacement screw for the reservoir but I am not sure if it will come off without a fight because the phillips head is stripped. @ LoneRider I am just an hour south of DC in fredericksburg if you are ever in the area maybe we can go for a ride and you could show me what the swiss army knife on wheels can do.:)
PM me if the shop refuses to cough up your skid plate; a ride to Gordonsville is scheduled April 7:

http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=660536&page=85

Think about cutting a flat-blade screwdriver slot in that screw with a Moto-Tool cut-off wheel . . . I'd still recommend an Impact Driver to remove it, but . . . a big screwdriver might work.
 

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Recently got my new to me 2001 klr650 with 3900 miles back from the shop. When I bought her she ran OK just needed to crank over awhile before she started because the gas was 5 months old. The tires were the original 01 tires that were showing their age. I took it to a shop that quoted me a good price on the phone for a tune-up, new tires and a battery tender. When I went to pick it up 4 weeks later they hand me a bill for 380.31 (parts)+19.02 (tax)+408.2 (5.8hrs labor)= 807.35 almost double the quote! New tires and a tune-up on my car doesn't cost that much! The parts they charged me for were: Float valve+clip (43.58), O-ring float chamber+drain screw (17.48), Shinko 705's (148.9), cotter pin (0.98), battery tender (39.95), battery (56.95), oil (22.47). They said that they had to rebuild my carb and replace the battery both of which they did not call me before doing. The tune up included: brake fluid flush/replace, engine oil (didn't change filter), valve adjustment, new spark plug and 2 gal. gas. I am new to motorcycling so I don't know if this a normal price to pay for this type of work or if I was "had". I am leaning towards the latter. They dropped the price to 705.02 after I asked them to work with me in the price because of the unauthorized work and incomplete tune-up (radiator fluid wasn't flushed as originally agreed). I payed them and took the bike home. As I am unloading the bike I notice the plastic skid plate is missing and a screw on the brake fluid reservoir was stripped. I called them and they said they would look into it. This was a couple of weeks ago. Should I take the bike back and ask them to replace the screw and skid plate? or should I let it slide?
I cant spend that kind of money every time I need an oil change. Which service manual is the best to get?

I welcome all feedback
I haven't had much experience with motorcycle shops, but even though they shouldn't have done some of the stuff without consulting you first (and didn't do some they should have) the cost doesn't really seem that out of line to me considering some of the work they did. I mean, it's a lot of money, but I doubt any other shop would have done that work for considerably less.

For example, I was going to put on some new tires before a trip I was taking last year and I'd sprained my left wrist and had so much other stuff going on at the time I considered letting the local dealer just do it for me. I've had them do some other work on mowers and stuff for me and I've never had an issue with their work or their charges. I know the service manager fairly well and he seems like a good guy.

But, when I called about the tires, these are the prices I got. Bear in mind, I already had the tires and tubes. I just wanted them to mount them for me.

Take the bike in and let them take both wheels off and change the tires:
$150

Take the wheels off and take them in and let them change the tires:
$90

They wouldn't budge on those estimates, either. I wound up putting the tires on myself at the last minute before the trip. I had to get my neighbor to do some of the work while I told him what to do.

The stripped screw and missing skid plate are, in my opinion, unacceptable.
Can't really say what I'd do. I see you've had some offers for a skid plate and the advice to change out the screws with allen-heads is the way to go.

To me, the stripped screw that wasn't replaced is an indicator of a problem with the people working in the shop. If a mechanic, or "technician" will let something like that slide and not be ashamed to give it back to the customer like that, what other shortcuts will he/she take?

But, I also don't like getting screwed over so personally I would go back to the shop and at least demand the skid plate even if I'd already gotten one from somebody on the forum.

Did they write down any information about the valve adjustment? If not, they might not have any record of it, but I would try to find out exactly what they found and what they did. Were the valves barely good but "within specs" so they just left them alone? Did they re-shim? If so, what were the measurements when they were done? That information would be good to know so you have a better idea of when to check them again but, as noted, if they didn't annotate that on any of the paperwork they gave you, you'll probably never get it. Can't hurt to ask, though.

Sure, it was a good chunk of change, but in one fell swoop you got a lot of work done that left you with a ready-to-ride KLR you can now enjoy.

Just remember when any of it needs to be done again, there's nothing they did at that shop that you can't do at home the next time it needs to be done and that's one of the great things about owning a KLR.

Between the Clymer's manual and the wealth of readily-available advice and information from the experienced riders/wrenchers here on this forum, there's not much you can't do. I've gotten a lot of help here and appreciate it.
 

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When it comes to getting the screw out, Lonerider brings up some good points about bits.

My .02 on that is to spit on the bit and then dip it in some Comet-type scouring powder before using it. The grit will help the bit better grip the screw head.

Depends on the condition of the screw head, but might help.
 

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PM me if the shop refuses to cough up your skid plate; a ride to Gordonsville is scheduled April 7:

http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=660536&page=85

Think about cutting a flat-blade screwdriver slot in that screw with a Moto-Tool cut-off wheel . . . I'd still recommend an Impact Driver to remove it, but . . . a big screwdriver might work.

my .02...

I wouldn't use a cutoff wheel, I would cut a slot into the cover! Get some sort of chisel type tool and turn the screw with that.

The reservoir is cast alluminum (or magnesium) I would be concerned about wacking it with an impact driver.
 

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my .02...

I wouldn't use a cutoff wheel, I would cut a slot into the cover! Get some sort of chisel type tool and turn the screw with that.

The reservoir is cast alluminum (or magnesium) I would be concerned about wacking it with an impact driver.
The small-diameter Moto-Tool cut-off disk, geometrically, can cut a slot in the screw head without destroying the cover, IMHO.

Concern about the fragility of the reservoir is well-taken, but . . . I do NOT recommend, for example, an 8-pound sledge hammer as an auxiliary tool-of-choice for activation of the impact driver. Rather, a lighter ball peen hammer, used with controlled, sharp, raps . . .

I've used this technique on both master cylinder reservoir screws, and on carburetor screws, without casting casualties yet.

Once more, the JIS bit profile fits the screw head more snugly, offers greater torque potential, and is less likely to booger the screw head than a SAE Phillips-head bit, either impact or regular screwdriver . . .
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I called the shop back today and they said they found the skid plate minus hardware and if I could get the screw off they would see if they could match it from their bins of miscellaneous screws. They told me to stop by anytime. I am going to see if they will take my bike in and put the skid plate on and replace the screw. Thank you guys for all your advice I feel better about shelling out the money because it seems that its within the normal realm on MC shops. I am definitely going to take full advantage of the info on the forums to wrench on my steed from now on. Never put tire on a rim before but my new tires should give me more than enough time to learn.
 

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don't let them change your headlight, or you will be heading home without a windscreen. i would be choked, if they didn't put your skid plate back on for you. as said. get a clymer, ask questions and welcome to the forum.
 
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