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Discussion Starter #1
This piqued my interest after seeing a post from klr4evr in another thread: I didn't want to jack it.

We just bought a new vehicle last month and it has nitrogen-filled tires. We didn't get charged extra for the "nitrogen package." The guy I bought the car from (I used to work with him at my current job before he left) just kind of shrugged and said, "If your tires get low, just put some regular air in them."

Personally, I don't buy the nitrogen gig. I just don't think there's really enough difference in physical characteristics between nitrogen and standard compressed air to mess with the nitrogen: certainly not enough that it would make a real difference in an SUV tire.

I might be wrong, though. Who knows? Under our extended warranty/service plan I can get all the free nitrogen fill-ups I want for the next four years. I suppose during that time there's no reason not to use the nitrogen if it doesn't cost me anything.
 

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Depends on how convenient it is to go to the dealership and have the nitrogen added. If you add air in the meantime technically they should be emptying the tire and then recharging with nitrogen. Will they do that???

Google will give you more info on nitrogen than you have time to read. Everybody has an opinion. Yes nitrogen has advantages over air. They are particularly noticeable if you drive F1. For the average schmuck you don't need it. Anybody who tells me that they can tell the difference between nitrogen and air is blowing smoke up you know where.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
We always used it in helicopter tires, air/oil struts and accumulators, etc. but I think that was mainly because it had less moisture in it. I don't think that really matters with car tires.
 

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It's used a LOT in offroad applications, that and Co2. Nitrogen is "dry" and has no water in it as opposed to just basic air. If you use it constantly it keeps the inside of the rim from corroding/rotting due to moisture.

The only reason it's popular in offroad applications is because people have nitrogen/Co2 for shock tuning so almost everyone has a bottle close by and it saves from needing an air compressor in the trailer.

Nitrogen molecules are larger than an air molecule. This aids in keeping the tire full as well as it doesn't "bleed" through the rubber as quickly.

For the average Joe, you'll probably never notice the benefits or difference using it. If it's free fill ups I'd use it but wouldn't go out of my way for them.
 

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I dont buy the bigger molecule thing. Air is approximately 78% Nitrogen, 21% Oxygen,1% other gasses and 1% water. From my Stock Car racing experience N2 filled tires were more pressure consistent than air filled because of the water. The air filled tires would gain more pressure than the N2 filled tires as the tires got hot.
To me air filled tires on a street car would actually be a benefit on long highway trips. The tires will build up more pressure, more pressure equals less rolling resistance which equals better gas milage over the long run.
Seriously folks the difference amounts to virtually nothing. There are much bigger factors affecting gasmilage or tire wear or whatever N2 is supposed to improve over plain air in your tires. Driving style is one, fuel quality is an other. Air filter condition is another.
Check your pressures once a month and add whatever is convenient and most available.
JJ
 

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I use 50/50 propane/ oxygen with grill igniters in the valve stems.


Nitro doesn't compress as easily as atmosphere but still does.
Probably doesn't matter a bit what you use other than flammable gasses.
Maybe helium will lighten the bike 2 lbs?????????

Just playin' of course.
Enjoy the new ride!!!
(even if it has too many wheels)
 

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Hmmm....50/50 propane and oxygen mix with igniters....Instant self inflating tires!!! Why didn't I think of it!!!
JJ
 

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I think it was Shell who was advertising Nitrogen enriched gasoline. Nitrogen being an inert gas doesn't seem like a good fuel enhancer to me....I'm just sayin'!!
jj
 

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Discussion Starter #10
As far as free nitrogen fillups go, I would imagine when we drop our car off at the shop for service and leave it there all day while we're at work, a handy compressed air hose would most likely find the valve stem of one of our low tires rather than a nitrogen hose if they knew we weren't there possibly watching through the waiting room window......

On a side note, I do really like the real-time tire pressure monitoring gadget. It will be a lot nicer to use than crouching down in the snow with a tire gauge once a month and cursing because in the process of checking the air in the tire I accidentally let out a couple of pounds so even if it was okay in the first place, I still have to drag out the hose and shoot some air in it. I'm pretty anal about tire pressures in anything, even my lawnmower, so do religiously check tire pressures at least once a month.

It only displays the pressures when you're driving, but as long as you remember to do it then, it's easy to monitor the tires.

I suppose shops are trying to make some extra money with the nitrogen gig. Vehicles are a lot more dependable these days: change the oil regularly and don't drive them like a maniac and they'll last a long time.

We had 178,000 miles on the '05 Durango we traded in for this Nissan. We never had to do anything to it besides regular services and replacing the camshaft and crankshaft sensors a few months ago but that only cost about $100. The only major services were a transmission service and replacing the plugs/wires at 100K.

My '03 Tacoma has 190,000 trouble-free miles on it and it's never been in the shop for anything but regular scheduled maintenance. I will be the one who finds out exactly how many miles it's good for as I plan to keep it until it dies. Once I retire and don't drive it as much, there's a possibility it might outlast me.......

Reminds me of this article I saw on The Onion the other day:

Toyota Recalls 1993 Camry Due To Fact That Owners Really Should Have Bought Something New By Now - The Onion - America's Finest News Source
 

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JustJeff, +1 My shop compressor adds 78% that seems to work out just fine still leaks out though.

Pure O2 sounds like the HOT tip not for smokers though...!!!!

Local shop was charging 7 bucks a wheel for nitrogen........
 

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On a side note, I do really like the real-time tire pressure monitoring gadget. It will be a lot nicer to use than crouching down in the snow with a tire gauge once a month and cursing because in the process of checking the air in the tire I accidentally let out a couple of pounds so even if it was okay in the first place, I still have to drag out the hose and shoot some air in it. I'm pretty anal about tire pressures in anything, even my lawnmower, so do religiously check tire pressures at least once a month.

You might change your tune on that if you ever have to pay for having one replaced and programmed to your car. All you need is some flunky in a tire shop ripping the sensor out when removing the tire from the rim. As I have learned from a bad experience they are not responsible for damages. Said so in the fine print that you signed without reading.

I was actually happy that when I bought my car it didn't have the sensors. A year later my brother purchased a programmer so that hit would be gone now. The sensors are pricey alone though.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You might change your tune on that if you ever have to pay for having one replaced and programmed to your car. All you need is some flunky in a tire shop ripping the sensor out when removing the tire from the rim. As I have learned from a bad experience they are not responsible for damages. Said so in the fine print that you signed without reading.

I was actually happy that when I bought my car it didn't have the sensors. A year later my brother purchased a programmer so that hit would be gone now. The sensors are pricey alone though.


Don't you guys have bailment agreements in Canada?

"Automobile Mechanic Liability

When you leave your car with a mechanic for repair or service, you have a bailment relationship with the mechanic. As a result, he has several legal duties. Specifically, the mechanic must:

Treat your car with a reasonable standard of care until you pick it up.

Make repairs in a skillful, careful, and workmanlike manner. He must have the ordinary skills of other mechanics.

Inspect your car to make sure that it is not a danger to the driver or other driver and repair the car to make it safe for use.

Give a written estimate and receive authorization before doing any repair work, in many states. In these places, even if the mechanic does excellent work and charges a reasonable price, the mechanic cannot recover for his work because he gave no estimate.

Not engage in fraud, concealment, lowballing, or bait and switch.

Not make unauthorized or unnecessary repairs."

Of course it's a different story if you have to hire a lawyer to pursue compensation for a valid complaint so these laws only mean so much, but I would think claiming to be "not responsible for damages" definitely falls under the categories of "fraud" and "concealment" at least here.
 

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Don't you guys have bailment agreements in Canada?
We probably do have such things but pursuing them is another matter.

Reading that there are too many things open to interpretation. What's "reasonable care"?? Ask 10 guys you'll get 10 different answers.

In my case I took a wheel in for a flat repair. Aluminum wheel that I had lovingly cared for the entire life of the car to that point. What the flunky did was hook the wheel weight with the tire changer and dragged the weight around the edge of the rim gouging it. When I pointed it out they pointed to the sign posted with the shop agreement stating that they weren't responsible for damages. They took the wheel and applied some polish and called it good. I left and never will be back.

This is Canadian Tire, a national chain. Only reason I went there was because it had a road hazard warranty. Lesson learned.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
That's kind of like walking into a Canadian Tire store and taking all the cash out of their register at gunpoint while wearing a t-shirt that says "Not Responsible For Your Losses."
 
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