Kawasaki KLR Forum banner

21 - 40 of 52 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,282 Posts
The existing hose connector takes glycol burps and pipes them over the engine and deposits them right in front of th rear tire.
There is a very good reason that the recovery bottle Vent hose / Overflow hose used to extend nearly to the tail light.
Coolant is very slippery on asphalt & concrete!

You might consider anchoring your bottle vent hose to the RH side of the swingarm.
 

·
Registered
08 KLR stock stock stock with doo-hickey.
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I did follow that hose back, it does not go to the same place as the carb overflow vent hose and fuel tank vent hose and battery vent hose, those all come together to the side of the rear suspension linkage. That coolant vent hose indeed follows back along the frame and rear fender, almost to the tail light. I will leave it there.

Rode a couple hundred miles today, 15 degrees celcius or less (55~60 F) for most of it. Temp does not get over 170~180F, as measured by my laser temp-gun on the cylinder. Thats above 1/4 on the guage.

Is that too cool? Do I need a new thermostat? Cardboard over half the rad on cool days?

Or is this KLR like an early 70s Volvo with a little chain to pull that opens a canvas covering on the rad?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
Temp does not get over 170~180F, as measured by my laser temp-gun on the cylinder. Thats above 1/4 on the guage.

Is that too cool? Do I need a new thermostat? Cardboard over half the rad on cool days?

Or is this KLR like an early 70s Volvo with a little chain to pull that opens a canvas covering on the rad?
Oil temperature is more important than the temperature reading of the cylinder.

And KLR oil temperatures tend to run too cool in my mind. If you dig into some of Tom Schmitz's work as posted on this forum you will find specific KLR engine oil temperature readings taken under various conditions. Off the top of my head, I can't recall the exact numbers but none were close to 212F. Ideally IC engine oil temperature needs to be close to 212F in order to "boil off" water vapor that is produced by the combustion process. Even with cooling system modifications, the KLR engine just doesn't heat the oil to what most folks consider the optimum temperature.

So the upshot here is that a new thermostat and/or cardboard covers will not help much for increasing the oil temperature.

Jason
 

·
Registered
08 KLR stock stock stock with doo-hickey.
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
This KLR came to me with the 4" PVC tool tube empty. I'm working on getting things together to stuff the tool tube with the tools I might need to self-rescue from some sort of busted or failed thing. Most common thing to make one walk is some sort of tire failure. I have tire spoons, but they are my shop tools. I also want to include wrenches for front and rear axle, that means 19mm and 27mm, I decided to use combination wrenches, and grind-shape the open-ends into tire spoons and leave the 12-pt box ends for the axle nuts. Not having any spare sacrificial metric combination wrenches, but a few decades of left over SAE wrenches, I find that the 1-1/6" wrench is half a thou of an inch smaller than 27mm, and 3/4" is 2 thou larger than 19mm. Easily close enough to the right size to take axle nut off with the box end. A few minutes on the bench grinder, and the open ends of the wrenches are now tire spoons, and the box ends are the right size for the front and rear axle nuts. Still have some shining and burnishing to do when I get a new 800-grit belt for my belt sander. But these two tire spoons worked well to change two golf cart tires, so they should work for bike tires. Into the tool tube they go, here's hoping I never need them on the road.
29535


29536
 

·
Registered
08 KLR stock stock stock with doo-hickey.
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
The Motion-pro levers at the Canadian retailers are like $70 for the 12/13 and the 27. They do not seem to carry a 19. If I had seen them before I made mine, I probably would have bought the Motion-pro ones. The Motion-pros are aluminum alloy, obviously lighter than my hack-job lever wrenches.

Does anyone know the maximum outside diameter of a KLR spark plug 18mm socket?

None of my socket-sets have 18mm, so I'm going to have to buy an 18mm socket for the spark-plug. As I understand it, a regular thick-wall 18mm socket will not fit. Can someone please caliper measure the outside of their 18mm socket that they know fits into the spark plug hole, and I will take my caliper along into the store as I hunt around for a socket of that size or thinner. It would be dumb to get a socket for my road-kit, only to find its too fat to fit in the sparkplug hole.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,282 Posts
I measure the oem KLR tool kit socket at 23.5mm maximum. You will probably need to rotate any steel tool socket against a grinder wheel to thin it down at the bottom 6 -12 mm, as I even put a 45 degree bevel on the very bottom 3mm of the oem tool kit sockets to keep the corners from digging into the pocket.
 

·
Premium Member
2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
This whole discussion makes me think I should increase the spark plug well diameter very slightly to get a regular size socket in there. I was thinking of using a cylindrical sandpaper on a die grinder to just slightly increase the diameter of the well. Of course, I’d have to plug the spark plug hole and blow/vacuum out any of the grit.
 

·
Premium Member
2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
I’m talking about .010” or less. And yes, I’ve modified a bunch of things to make them work better.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,282 Posts
So you want to grind on a $300 head........
Have you priced a new cylinder head? Blank, no valve seals, valves, springs, retainers, keepers. About $1100.00.

Any used head with good bearings and all valves installed may be $600 & still need attention to valve seats & valve faces.

Best to grind on the socket, PeteK. ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,669 Posts
the price of heads and scarcity of cylinders are a couple reasons why I'm looking for a cheap, running 1996 - 2007 parts/project bike

Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
No I didn't price a head, I just pulled $300 out of the air because it was 100 times more than the out of the air socket price.
So the real world price on a head makes grinding the socket look much better. Right?
The first time I pulled the plug on mine, I noticed the socket was tight, so without thinking, I went to the grinder and took a little off. Fixed!
 

·
Registered
08 KLR stock stock stock with doo-hickey.
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #34 ·
I measured the 18mm socket I just bought... 23.4mm so it should fit. But just to make sure, I'm going to (fix what ain't broke until it is) take the tank off and check to make sure it fits. If the socket fits, I will sculpt-grind (on the socket!!) a 19mm hex onto the socket that will fit the 19mm combination tire-spoon-front-axle-nut-wrench I made a few days ago.

The three different fastener heads to get to the spark-plug are an annoyance to me. Two phillps-head screws on the top surface of the side plastics. About ten 8mm-head bolts holding the front and rear side plastics on. Two 10mm head bolts holding the seat on. Two 10mm head bolts holding the tank on. And two microscopic spring-clip hose clamps on the vac-line and fuel line on the petcock.

I'm going to go to my allen-head bolt assortment kit and try and replace all of the bolts and screws that hold the plastics and tank on with bolts that fit the same size allen wrench. The two down-facing phillips-head screws on the tops of the side-plastics may need their clip-in nuts replaced.

One Ikea-like allen wrench to get the side plastics and the tank off? Darwin the Ikea Monkey would be able to get to the spark plug ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
The three different fastener heads to get to the spark-plug are an annoyance to me.
I remember seeing a video on another forum showing a person removing the spark plug on a Gen II without the gas tank removed. However, the problem I see with this approach is that it does not afford the opportunity to blow out all the sand/dirt/crude from around the base of the spark plug.

The Kawasaki Owner's Manual recommends replacing the spark plug after 7,500 miles, which for me and my short trips equates to about two years. So having to use a Phillips, an Allen and a socket wrench to get to the spark plug every two years is not particularly annoying to me. What does bug me is the amount of stuff that has to be removed in order to gain access to the spark plug. I guess I'm spoiled by the "hanging out there in the breeze" location of the spark plugs on my Ultra Limited and Aermacchi.

Jason
 

·
Registered
08 KLR stock stock stock with doo-hickey.
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I agree it shouldn't be so hard to get to spark plug(s). Yes, gone are the days of a flat-head model-A Ford for which a 12" crescent wrench would suffice. But even most jammed-in transverse 4cyl UJMs provided a means of removing the plugs with a socket and 6" extension. Diminished access to plug is the price we pay for having all that nice ornamental bodywork and the big tank.

There is a "blow-out / drain hole" for the recessed sparkplug well just under the coolant outlet - or thermobob if equipped. A thermobob somewhat diminishes access to the drain hole, but you can still get to it. In a shop situation with tank removed, one would remove the sparkplug wire and boot, poke around in there with some stiff wire to loosen dirt and crud, and then blow in there with 120 psi compressed air to get everything out, and for good measure give a blast of air up the drain hole. On the trail-side with the tank on, and the only compressed air available is like 1.2 psi its a little more complicated. I usually have a couple feet of fuel-line size hose in my road-kit, will make sure my road-kit piece of hose is at least 2 feet long.

And one always has a generous ball of haywire in the road-kit...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,669 Posts
I remember seeing a video on another forum showing a person removing the spark plug on a Gen II without the gas tank removed. However, the problem I see with this approach is that it does not afford the opportunity to blow out all the sand/dirt/crude from around the base of the spark plug.

The Kawasaki Owner's Manual recommends replacing the spark plug after 7,500 miles, which for me and my short trips equates to about two years. So having to use a Phillips, an Allen and a socket wrench to get to the spark plug every two years is not particularly annoying to me. What does bug me is the amount of stuff that has to be removed in order to gain access the spark plug. I guess I'm spoiled by the "hanging out there in the breeze" location of the spark plugs on my Ultra Limited and Aermacchi.

Jason
I agree 100%; the risk of getting dirt into the cylinder is extreme, even if you blow out the crud through the drain hole.....personally, I wouldn't attempt it with the tank in place.

I've found that plugs last longer than 7500 miles and since it's a gigantic PITA, I only change them when I'm doing a valve shim check or other operation where I have everything apart anyhow.

Dave
 

·
Premium Member
2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
I agree 100%; the risk of getting dirt into the cylinder is extreme, even if you blow out the crud through the drain hole.....personally, I wouldn't attempt it with the tank in place.

I've found that plugs last longer than 7500 miles and since it's a gigantic PITA, I only change them when I'm doing a valve shim check or other operation where I have everything apart anyhow.

Dave
Ditto, and I buy the long life iridium spark plugs from EM, so I won’t have to change them again in the time I own the bike.

...and I don’t see how you can change the spark plug with the tank and body panels in place without more effort than removing them. And if you have the wrap-around crash bars, fuhgedaboudit.
 

·
Registered
08 KLR stock stock stock with doo-hickey.
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Rainy day in central Alberta so I took the tank off to look at spark plug and check that my socket fits. I put the socket I bought on the plug, it doesn't seem to have any clearance issues on the sides, fits on the plug and jiggles a bit. I ground the top of the socket into a 19mm hexagon to fit my recently manufactured combination front-axle-nut-tire-spoon. While apart this far, I will replace the plug with an NGK Iridium.

No one "plans" on taking a plug out outside of the shop, if roadside/trailside plug-removal is necessary its usually because of some screw-up. If I ever find myself in such a situation, I will take the tank off to lessen the likelihood of layering one screw-up on top of another. Dropping crud in, or cross-threading or some other screw-up I haven't even thought of will be vastly diminished if the tank is off.

This is a test of my road-kit spark plug removal tools, a bit fiddly 1/24 of a turn at a time, but it works.
29600


What I have learned is that when in my shop for post-ride routine maintenance and check-over, a blast of 120psi shop air in the spark plug well drain hole is in order. Only takes a moment, and seems to be quite effective at clearing crap from around base of plug. Just make it part of check-over routine, and be more prepared should roadside plug removal be necessary.
 

·
Premium Member
2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
I see you still have the AIS system installed. You should consider removing it for several reasons: 1. simplify the top of the engine for easier access; 2. less crap to go wrong; 3. Less exhaust popping.
 
21 - 40 of 52 Posts
Top