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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to keep up with skiphunt. how are these.





 

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Discussion Starter #5
iyaoyas98 said:
buddy2224 said:
The first two are awesome, but I can't figure out what the last one is. Maybe that's the point though?
A leg of a stone arch? Great pics!
that pretty good iyaoyas98. that's the northern arch in moab.
 

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Here's a couple of "Photo Hints" for ya... always try to get something in the foreground to establish depth. Especially with those grand scenery pics. Frame your shot so that only 1/3 of the sky or ground is at the top or bottom. (Rule of Thirds, I think it's called). Never center any subject in the middle of the shot. Some photograhers put a sticky dot over the center of their view screen.

Othwise, yeah... good eye. Keep shooting. Remember, professional photographers take hundreds of crap shots before they find one on the whole roll that makes it into National Geographic. Just keep increasing your odds for success!

What kind of camera are you using?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Biker Scout said:
Here's a couple of "Photo Hints" for ya... always try to get something in the foreground to establish depth. Especially with those grand scenery pics. Frame your shot so that only 1/3 of the sky or ground is at the top or bottom. (Rule of Thirds, I think it's called). Never center any subject in the middle of the shot. Some photograhers put a sticky dot over the center of their view screen.

Othwise, yeah... good eye. Keep shooting. Remember, professional photographers take hundreds of crap shots before they find one on the whole roll that makes it into National Geographic. Just keep increasing your odds for success!

What kind of camera are you using?
never heard any of that stuff biker. thanks so much, thats the kinda stuff I am looking for. info on how to shoot.

explain a little more about the foregrround. do you mean like the motorcycle in front or the handle bars? Or like a large rock?

The camera is Cannon, Powershot SD630. Digital Elph. 6.0 pixels.
 

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Yeah, that's a good camera. I've got the SD400 for KLR Rides. (It was slimmer than the others) My hunch was that it was a Canon.

Anyway, having something in the foreground means a subject of some kind. For instance, I happen to know there are quite a lot of small pine trees along the tim of the Grand Canyon. It's your job as the photographer to go and crawl on the ground and get the right angle, lighting and subject. Do what it takes, and you'll be rewarded for your efforts. Anyway, by placing a small tree or a cluster of rocks in the foreground of the pic, even if it's off to the side gives the photos a sense of depth and gives a subject so that the viewer's eyes have something to be drawn to.

For instance, popluar shots of stark rugged mountains or grand gorges with a cluster of wild flowers shows off nature in both it's majestic gradure and soft subtle beauty in the same frame. Same can be said for animals in your shot. A lizard perched on a rock with some striking monolith in the background is a sure fire crowd pleaser. But you have to get down to lizard eye level to make the shot compelling.

I'm not good at snap shots. So when it's birthday time or whatever, I have to hand to camera to my wife because it's not artsy enough for me, and pics never get taken. I'm weird, I know. But I've just got to be really moved about something to take it's picture first.

I'm not very good at taking pictures, but I dabble. I'm a good student and learn as much as I can.

 

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Discussion Starter #9
BS;

is this better. something in the foreground. is that what you are talking about?

I like your pic.


 

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Looks like the Marin Headlands.

OK, Nice Pic, but your subject matter is dead center bullseye in the middle. Move your horizonline up a little bit higher and the sun off to the left or right. A close passing by object like a "Closer" sailboat would make this pic pop!
 

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A KLR stuck in the mud there would do it too. :lol:


Looks like the rocks at the bottom are the "something in the foreground".

Right or wrong, hey I'm trying to learn something too.
 

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Yeah, that's a Mono Lake Tufa Tower.

The rocks in the foreground would work if you got down on your stomach to them... then you'd have a more flat horizion line with the water and the sail boats would then stick up above the line a little better. But before you snap, ask yourself if the rocks make an interesting focal point or subject.

Sunsets are hard to get just right anyway. Everyone likes the colors and they way it looks in person, but rarely does that translate to film. Which is why they have these photography guidlines to follow. Helps your pics be the best they can be.
 

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The first thing I tell someone to do is don't just look at the subject. Look at the entire viewfinder/screen as a print. Sounds simple but it's a whole different way of looking at it.
To me , prospective is the easiest to do and understand. Moving just a few feet can sometimes make a world of difference in a photo, and you can see the difference, just by looking at the viewfinder/screen.
Take some time to understand your camera, you may be surprised what it can do. Learn all the rules of photography you can (some listed in an earlier post), and don't be afraid to brake them. But you must understand them to know when and why to break them.
The biggest to remember is, if you like it shoot it.
 
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