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So sorry to hear about that, heal up and just take it easy for a while. Been there, done that with not remembering the accident.
The bike will wait for you.
 

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Wow, sorry to hear this PT-13. Wishing you the speediest recovery possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #63
Thanks a lot guys! Very much appreciated. I think I’m doing better than expected so far really. Considering the final injuries were, all on left side......
Broken fibula, 4 metatarsals, shoulder blade, clavicle, 9 ribs, collapsed lung, and spleen removed.
My plan to ride the back roads and trails to avoid the dangers of riding on busy roads seemed to have failed miserably. Ha!
I’m just glad I still have a seat at the party!
 

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So sorry to hear about your get-off and hope you're well on the way to recovery. I'm pretty sure I have a brake bracket around here in the Shed of Horrors. I'll dig it out and set it aside. When you're ready for it I'll send it along to you. I also have one black tank cowling, but can't remember which side. I have headlight cowlings, too, in '09 blue.

Get well soon!
 

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Discussion Starter #65
Tom, you’re a gentleman and a scholar! Please do. Best I can tell the left and center cowl (headlight fairing) needs replaced. Both side radiator fairings or whatever you call them looked fine. The handlebars are bent down and the windshield and brace I had are bent down but don’t have a scratch on them, which makes me think my body took them out. Had the 3 pelican cases on and they took the brunt in the back.
My friend took these after the accident.
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488FA244-1B19-4B77-B3F7-F4ACD63A1E0A.jpeg
51CD59FD-1A21-4535-A206-089445F9711D.jpeg
 

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I'll start a 'box 'o stuffs' to send you.
The center cowling for the fairing is something I don't have, but I do have the two side pieces. I'll put those aside for you. They are '09 blue, but in fairly good shape.

On your turn signals, the best approach would probably be to buy the 3-D Cycle turn signal repair kit.

If your nerf bars are bent, broken, or otherwise AFU I have a set that I can put in the box. They are pretty cherry. I don't recall if they had the beefed-up cross brace or if I just bent mine outward after I bitched to Tim about what crap the design was while he was trying to have a good time at Moab. That was insensitive of me but, hey, I am often a cranky asshole.

I should have a Gen 2 rear brake lever, but I don't know where it is. I know that I have two Gen 1 levers from a recent foray into the Shed of Horrors.

I will look to see if I have a fairing subframe; your's might be bent. I am quite sure I don't have any handlebars, though I have one mirror. I'd have to look to see which side it is.
 

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Wow.
It appears to have sheared the RH footrest bracket bolts off.

After many of my off-road & dual-sport bike 'crash' incidents, the first words out of my mouth usually were, "Hows my Bike?".
And I usually dusted myself off and at least rode the dirt bike back to the truck or the dual-sport bike all the way home.

I count myself lucky, that I have spent more medical money on snow sports injuries than motorcycle injuries over the past 50 years of riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Tom,
Keep a box and what you want for it all. Not worried about the color, might paint it just for fun anyway. The good news a while back I picked up some random leftovers from a local guy for a song. Have 2 mint mirrors and a whole set of 4 mint turn signals. The bars I’ll probably pick up some aftermarket. The caribou racks on the back are all attached and are pretty deformed. They were lightly framed square tubing
I hope they failed and the subframe isn’t bent. Not a huge deal if it is. When able I’ll get it on the Jack and really go over it all. Forks out and looked at, etc. The headlight/fairing mount is tweaked. If not too bad I’ll try to tweak it back. Doesn’t look too bad so far.

Paul:
Yeh, that foot peg probably won’t be a fun fix and I’m not a welder. And that had jns lowering brackets with 12.9 bolts in it. It didn’t go easy. Will deal as needed I guess.

And thank guys for all the help.While it will be a while before I can work on it, it does me good to think about better things to come. And I’m really looking forward to it!
 

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PT-13Pilot: sorry to hear of your injuries. The bike actually doesn’t look that bad, but I didn’t see how the pelican cases fared.

Let me turn this thread back to the title. My 2013 with 27Kmi is burning a lot of oil (1qt/120 miles at highway speeds) as I mentioned in another post. I plan to do a 685 or other piston displacement upgrade over the winter in the meantime I want to do the oil control mods to see if that reduces the consumption to a lesser environmental catastrophe.

I am thinking of doing the oil filter mod first, rather than banjo bolts, and then measuring consumption. I read Paul’s experiments with oil pressure and Tom’s discussion on his Souperdoo site.

As an engineer looking at the oiling system, I suspect that the oil flow through the banjo bolts and oil piping is more restricted by the piping diameter and length than by the banjo bolts. The big difference in oil control comes from putting a restriction in the passage to the crank, which reduces the oil thrown on the cylinder walls and increases the pressure and flow to the other parts of the engine. In perusing this forum and other KLR sites, I have not found complaints that the cam journals or transmission wear out (unless they run out of oil!). To the contrary, there are plenty of KLRs with more than 50Kmi on the original engine.

DO you see any problems with this reasoning?

I also need to put stiffer springs in the clutch as mine is slipping a little at full throttle. Might as well do them together.
 

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Perhaps you can do some fluid calculations around these numbers. The ID of the pipe is 4mm. The stock banjo bolt opening is 1.5mm and is a single opening. The revised banjo bolts have double openings of 3mm save for the transmission bolt, which has one 3mm opening. All banjo bolts have an axial hole of 4mm.

The restriction placed in the circuit feeding the crank is well-tested at 2.2mm.
 

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So the cross holes on the banjo bolts are only 1.5mm diameter? I must have missed that measurement when I was reading about it on your site. The cross section of those holes is 1.77sqmm each. The cross section of the 4mm ID pipe is 12.56sqmm.
That makes a big difference in my engineering-eyeball analysis. Without getting into a calculation of the flow using the oil viscosity, length of pipe, considering whether it’s laminar flow in the pipe (probably), the cross sections of the restrictions, etc., I’m reasonably sure that the sum of 1.5mm holes will restrict the flow (and increase the pressure) more than the lengths of pipe.

At any rate, putting the #43 restriction in the passage to the crank will decrease oil to the crank/cylinder walls, and force more oil to the cams and transmission, even without opening up the holes in the banjo bolts. I might do the oil filter cover mod first, just to see how much difference it makes in my oil consumption because now I’m curious, then do the banjo bolts.
 

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So the cross holes on the banjo bolts are only 1.5mm diameter?...
It's worse than that. The OEM bolts are not cross-drilled. There's only one axial hole.

I never did figure out what the free-flow rate out of the pump was. I'm not sure if it is high enough to cause the length of the pipe to make a difference or even cause any sort of flow issues, laminar or turbulent.

Let's put it this way: there isn't enough flow at 5000 engine rpm to create more than 1psi at the cams. In truth, it hardly makes 1/2 psi. It's just enough flow to keep a film in the plain bearings of the camshaft.

BTW, from the article:
"Paul’s Initial Investigation

Paul took the banjo bolts out and saw that they had only one tiny 1/16” diameter hole feeding oil to the transmission and cams. There are three banjos; one at the case where the external oil pipe starts, one at the head that feeds the cams, and one at the transmission. They are all identical with just one tiny hole in them. Paul knew that on other engines of similar size Kawasaki had installed bolts that were cross-drilled with 1/8” holes, and he knew he had a way to move oil from the crank to the other side of the oiling system."

I must confess that the 1/16" quoted above is not precise and only mildly accurate. As I could not recall ever really measuring that hole (guilty, as the Italian driver with no rearview mirror, of not caring much what was behind me), I measured it today. It is .073"/1.85mm in diameter.
 

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At any rate, putting the #43 restriction in the passage to the crank will decrease oil to the crank/cylinder walls, and force more oil to the cams and transmission, even without opening up the holes in the banjo bolts. I might do the oil filter cover mod first, just to see how much difference it makes in my oil consumption because now I’m curious, then do the banjo bolts.
I encourage you to do so. We won't know which helps reduce cylinder wall oiling the most, without trials like this.

Have you ever read the original thread, with Toms graphs of my pressure numbers and with all of its twists & turns?
 

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Paul, yes I read both your thread and Tom’s Souperdoo article. Lots of info on both. I have a pretty good memory for numbers and technical details but I’m sure I missed some of the details.

My bike sucks so much oil (1qt in 120 miles at highway speed) that the experiment will only give a general idea of how much difference it makes to only restrict oil to the crank. But hey, if it goes to say 1qt per 500 miles, I’ll be ecstatic. Long term fix—Big bore kit—will have to wait for the winter.
 

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Answered in another post I’m sure but..... How much of a difference does using full synthetic oil make in providing better lubrication assuming the small diameter sizes of the banjo bolts is the main issue?
 

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Oh yeah, lots of discussion. Discussing oil is like discussing politics.

I used to be firmly in the synthetic oil camp but have moderated my views over the past 10 years to account for the level of oil consumption, specific applications in motorcycles, and types of oil. 40+ years ago, when synthetic oils first hit the market, they were so clearly superior to motor oils based on refined crude stock that choosing a synthetic was a no-brainer. I can tell you my many personal experiences with engines run on petroleum base oils and then switching over to Mobil1.

But over the decades, petroleum base oils have improved dramatically too. I won’t recount those discussions, but at this point in time my opinion is that either will work just as well under the usual conditions in “liquid cooled engines”. That’s a key qualifier, because air cooled engines get much hotter in certain areas than water cooled engines, so for air cooled engines I prefer synthetics because of their high temperature performance.

But one characteristic about motorcycles you should keep in mind is this: most motorcycles, including KLRs, have a wet clutch, that is, the clutch runs in the oil bath of the engine. I and many other people had the experience of switching to a synthetic automobile oil and then the clutch started slipping. Then we switched back to conventional oil and the clutch operated normally. The synthetic oils were actually too slippery! However, today, you can buy synthetic oils designed for motorcycles that have modifiers and additives that behave well with a wet clutch.

I won’t go into how ZDDP levels on oils have dropped significantly in response to EPA and catalyst performance requirements over the past 20 years, but that has made a big difference in oil formulations for cars versus diesel trucks versus motorcycles too.

For a KLR, the Bottom line is that you can buy conventional or synthetic oils forumated for the different requirements of motorcycles and both will work well. If you change your oil frequently, say 3000-5000 miles, on a liquid cooled bike, it won’t make any difference except in your wallet. If you want to go to longer change intervals, use synthetic motorcycle oil. If you are in some remote place and can’t find motorcycle oul, use a conventional oil for Diesel engines.

For much more debate, search past threads.
 

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Answered in another post I’m sure but..... How much of a difference does using full synthetic oil make in providing better lubrication assuming the small diameter sizes of the banjo bolts is the main issue?
Look at post #100 first & second pics.
Oil Quality is not an issue here & under normal circumstances oil Quantity should not be an issue either.

Too many people are trying to read between the lines and coming up with the mis-inturpretation that the banjo bolts are at issue, that is incorrect. That is WHY I put them LAST on this list. Mod #7 on this list was the primary goal!
Read here,
PDW Oil Flow Mods, order of importance.
 
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