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Discussion Starter #1
I know this has been covered, but it seems like every old thread i found took me down another road of more questions and less answers.

My Goal is to add LED Auxiliary lighting via the JNS mounts.

I have ordered and am swapping:
The headlights to Cyclops LED.
The dash to LED from super bright.
The tail light with the WOW kit from happy trails.

I am assuming this has been done before (lots) and 12V is not necessarily my strong suit...... How concerned should i be as to wattage of my LED Aux lights?

I will be using this as a commuter on mountain roads in the early mornings- hoping to see the critters a little sooner than later :nerd:
 

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Fear not; LEDs typically use less power than incandescent bulbs; the Generation 2 alternator covers your power budget adequately, IMHO.

I know it's DONE; but . . . why change the minuscule power-using OEM dash lights to LEDs? Longer-lasting than bulbs, surely; but . . . insignificant power savings, again, in my view (I could be HORRIBLY in error!).
 

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Info from JeffSaline and GoMotor;

In 2005 I did a draw test on all the circuits of my Gen I, 2003, KLR650. Then I took the specs for the Gen I and did the conversion. My guess is the Gen II KLRs use about the same amount of electrickery to operate the bike.

I dug out my factory service manuals and found the specs for the A14-A17, 2000, 2001, 2002 & 2003 models at the rear of the supplement manual. It rates the alternator at 17 amps @ 7,000 rpm @ 14 volts. That puts it at about 238 watts @ 7,000 rpm @ 14 volts.

The specs at the front of the supplement rate the alternator for A1-A9 at 14 amps @ 8,000 rpm @ 14 volts. That put the earlier alternators at 196 watts @ 8,000 rpm @ 14 volts.

For the Gen II (via Clymers) it is rated at (2008-2010) 14 volts at 17 amps at 7,000 rpm. The Gen II (2011-on) is rated at 14.5 volts at 17 amps at 7,000 rpm. So for the 2008-2010 it is 238 watts and for the 2011-on it is 246.5 watts.

Here is what MY KLR used for electrickery.

- With the headlight off, key on, I got a reading of 1.51 amps. I think this only taillight & instrument lights.
- With the headlight on, key on, I got a reading of 5.43 amps. Low beam drawing 3.92 amps.
- With the headlight on high beam, key on I got a reading of 6.10 amps. High beam drawing 4.59 amps.
- With the headlight off, key on, fan on, I got a reading of 3.83 amps. Fan drawing 2.32 amps.
- With the headlight off, key on, horn blowing, I got a reading of 3.08 amps. Horn drawing 1.57 amps.
- With the headlight off, key on, Dual Star LED Brake light on, I got a reading of 1.93 amps. LED brake light drawing 0.42 amps.
- My heated grips are on a different circuit and I got readings of 1.55 amps and 2.75 amps.
- My Gr8 Design heated vest pulled 2.21 amps.
- I didn't test my heated gloves.

This was done with a battery reading only 12.05 volts

So for MY KLR650 I'm maybe using 95 watts when using the bike.

Hope this info is helpful.

Best,

Jeff
Gomotor:
I fooled around with some numbers on my gen2.
Here is what I got.

Specs for alternators from sales brochures:
gen 1 = 14 amp: gen2 = 17 amp
At 14 Volts gen1 = 196 Watts; Gen2 = 238 Watts

ELECTRICAL USAGE in Watts excluding non continuous loads like turn signals, brake lights etc for Gen2

Dash meter lights 3 x 3.4 = 10.2
Tail Light 8
Tag light 8
Low beam headlight 55
High beam light (Gen-2 only) 55
High beam indicator 3.4
Ignition system ?? unknown
----
Gen-2 = 139.6 Watts Gen-1 = 84.6 Watts
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Awesome!

Thank you guys, the information available from all your combined experience is much appreciated.

Why the dash lights? good question, it's a cheap farkle and figured with the known issues with KLR power, any amperage I could save so much the better......And i got a few different colors to try, greens, blues and whites, all wide angle.....
 

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And, if you're worried about current capacity (e.g., you want to power Gerbings jacket liner, gloves, pants, and socks); there's always the option of the trick high-power aftermarket stator!

(Got one, on my Generation 1.)

Since, "There's no such thing as a FREE LUNCH," reality informs us: The higher maximum output stator actually produces LESS electric power at lower rpm than the stocker; higher output at higher rpm.
 

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Rather than calculating power draws and alternator output, I like to have a volt meter on the dash. That way there is no guessing involved.

As Damocles points out, I did the calculations and determined that my gen2 should have about 100 Watts extra to power accessories. In Houston I don't have a need for much extra power, but over Thanksgiving I rode over the Continental Divide on the way to Las Vegas and passed through some freezing temperatures with snow on the sides of the road.

At 5,000 rpm with the high beam on and 80 Watts of heated vest and 20 Watts of heated grips the Volt meter still indicated 13.8 Volts. A nice thing on the gen2 is that if your Volt meter tells you that you need a little extra charging capacity, you can turn off the high beam and pickup 50 Watts when needed.

For dash lighting, I like LED lights that have an array of small elements pointing outward. This spreads the light out across the face of the instrument illuminating the whole face better. Also, they last longer and if one element burns out, you still have the other four working for you. I stick with the white ones.
 

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I have a GEN 2 2015 KLR and I run heated grips(heat demon) and run Denali light that draws 3.2 amps total. I have never had any problems with the draw, then I don't sit standing still in traffic with everything on and the high beam on. I also have a voltmeter that I look monitor.
 

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Rather than calculating power draws and alternator output, I like to have a volt meter on the dash. That way there is no guessing involved.

As Damocles points out, I did the calculations and determined that my gen2 should have about 100 Watts extra to power accessories. In Houston I don't have a need for much extra power, but over Thanksgiving I rode over the Continental Divide on the way to Las Vegas and passed through some freezing temperatures with snow on the sides of the road.

At 5,000 rpm with the high beam on and 80 Watts of heated vest and 20 Watts of heated grips the Volt meter still indicated 13.8 Volts. A nice thing on the gen2 is that if your Volt meter tells you that you need a little extra charging capacity, you can turn off the high beam and pickup 50 Watts when needed.

For dash lighting, I like LED lights that have an array of small elements pointing outward. This spreads the light out across the face of the instrument illuminating the whole face better. Also, they last longer and if one element burns out, you still have the other four working for you. I stick with the white ones.
Really need an ammeter to know whether you are consuming more than the alternator is producting. A voltmeter won’t tell you that directly. You might be able to infer it if you know at exactly what voltage reading your current draw goes negative.
 

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Installing an ammeter is a giant pain in the ass but, to Voyager's point, it provides the best information.

What I wish was made is a small inductive ammeter with a remote head. If the ammeter could be designed to clip onto a 14 gauge wire it would be a simple matter to clip it to the white wire and then run small gauge wires to a remote head on the dash.

There must be a technical reason for not making such a thing. I know an induction ammeter is not going to be the most accurate device, but it should be good enough to tell us what we need to know on a motorsickle.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, I got all the LED light installs done today....now to choose my Aux lighting....and I will change my USB outlet to one that includes a Voltmeter- assuming thats what the above posts are referring too?

I do ride mountain passes (5000 foot) in early morning hours spring and fall it is cool, but i think layering my winter gear will suffice..... Hoping to not do heated gear.
 

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Back in the day farmers used what was called a canvas/plexiglass. "heater housing" in the Winter to provide some warmth on their cab-less tractors. It wasn't a temporary cab, just a shroud that routed engine heat and provided some windscreen protection for the operator. This is basically the same principle applied to motorcycles and strikes me as simple and ingenious.

I've never seen one and didn't know there was such a thing. Enjoyed the writeup!
 

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There must be a technical reason for not making such a thing. I know an induction ammeter is not going to be the most accurate device, but it should be good enough to tell us what we need to know on a motorsickle.
My memory indicates, back in the day, automobiles were equipped with dashboard meters labeled, "AMPS." The needles on these meters had a default center position, and could swing to the right ("+") or to the left ("-"), depending upon the immediate functioning of the GENERATOR and its load. The meter indicated whether the battery was being CHARGED, or was DISCHARGING. I do not recall any quantifying markings (as in, how MANY amps might have been traveling either way), and . . . I'm unsure of the wiring for these indicators.

I'd imagine these primitive indicators were wired directly (don't think wrap-around meters existed back in those days). Looks like a similar arrangement might be possible on motorcycles of today.

------------------------------

Well, found an image of this Model A meter; the dial actually measures numerically the amp flow:



Reckon one of these might work on a bike; once we figure out the WIRING.
 

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Damocles,

Those were the '30-0-30' ammeters. They required hefty 10 gauge wire, through which all of the car's current passed and into which the gauge was wired in series.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
And to Add to my question....Hopefully not too deep into the thread:

I want to add a Fuse box/ Power distribution, to minimize my wiring....Is there any advantage on a KLR to doing the expensive 'PDM' vs a simple waterproof fuseblock?

It looks like on some other threads that the best place to mount it is near the horn? thoughts?
 

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Damocles,

Those were the '30-0-30' ammeters. They required hefty 10 gauge wire, through which all of the car's current passed and into which the gauge was wired in series.
I might play around with my Harbor Freight wrap-around ammeter and see what it says! If current can be measured by encircling, say, battery positive lead, then . . . wiring the sensor to a dash gauge should be a doable do, seems to me.
 

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And to Add to my question....Hopefully not too deep into the thread:

I want to add a Fuse box/ Power distribution, to minimize my wiring....Is there any advantage on a KLR to doing the expensive 'PDM' vs a simple waterproof fuseblock?

It looks like on some other threads that the best place to mount it is near the horn? thoughts?
I chose to add my fuse box at the left rear, making a mounting plate that used the frame bosses that were for the evaporative emissions canister.

The fuse box I use is from a Suzuki Bandit and is available from Cycle Terminal: ATC/ATO 5 Circuit Bussed Fuse Box

Is peekture:


I like this location because I can bring a hot-all-the-time from the starter solenoid and it is a short run.

The location near the horn is good, too, becasue there is a key-on hot at the horn. It is easy to extend off of that hot to power the fuse box.
 
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