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Gas

Only two in N.H.

Wish there were more. Wonder how much it's going for per gallon.
How competetive pricing, etc.
 

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Only two in N.H.

Wish there were more. Wonder how much it's going for per gallon.
How competetive pricing, etc.
There may be more. The site is maintained and updated by the users. I'll be adding a few local country stores to the list that are in my neck of the woods that have a high number of landscapers and tree workers that have a tough time finding straight gasoline.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Only two in N.H.

Wish there were more. Wonder how much it's going for per gallon.
How competetive pricing, etc.
Last weekend I gased up at the Getty in Freedom, NH.
It was $4.27/gal for the pure gas. Their regular 10% ethanol was about $3.60/gal.
 

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Most stations here offer NO ethanol in Premium grade fuel. There is ethanol, up to 10%, in the mid and low grade.
 

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We have three locally. Since they only offer it in premium grade I usually pass. Seems a waste. However, I don't really know the consequences of it.
 

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Interesting list. I thought the geo-political side of the listings might tell some stories, but I guess since it's not comprehensive and just relies on people to inform them of a station, none can be read. Must admit, there were a lot more straight-gas-selling stations here in Midwestern Corn/Ethanol Country than I thought there would be.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
However, I don't really know the consequences of it.
I'm not an expert, but my understanding is there are two major concerns about ethanol.
(Please, anybody that knows more about it, feel free to correct me.)
Ethanol is a solvent or an alcohol.
1) It will disolve rubber, certain plastics, fiberglass, etc. Parts that may be in a fuel system.
2) It attracts or will absorb moisture. You can end up with water in your fuel. I understand it gets worse the longer it sets (eg. winter storage).

I think I heard there may also be problems with deposits, "varnish" and/or corrosion. Anybody know more?
 

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I went out and had a read of my owners manual in regard to fuel. I knew that my Goldwing was okay with up to 10% ethanol but wasn't sure about Kawasaki specs. Seems like it's okay so as far as the fuel system disintegrating because of ethanol I don't think it's an issue. I'm more concerned with the poor shelf life of fuel and the reduced fuel economy.
 

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While not a proponent of the ethanol industry, I use it. The only station around here that sells straight gas is 30 miles away.

As noted by klr4evr, shelf life is a concern.

Which brings up a related question, since I run the ethanol blend in everything and we're talking shelf life.

Seems like all small engine manufacturers recommend you drain the fuel system for storage. I'm guessing they're probably right and I'm probably wrong, but I don't do it with my motorcycles, mowers or anything else.

At the end of the season, I fill the tanks, then add fairly copious amounts of Seafoam and let the engines run for awhile to make sure the Seafoam has circulated through the system.

Everything fires right up in the Spring. Again, I may be foolish, but it seems to me there are components in the fuel system, such as seals, o-rings, etc., that depend on the fuel for lubrication/preservation. It doesn't make any sense to dry them out for months at a time by draining everything.

Am I mistaken? Should I top off the KLR tank and add some Seafoam, shut off the tank and then drain the rest of the fuel system? We're talking a term of about 3-4 months here with a 10% ethanol blend and Seafoam in the system.
 

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The ones that sell premium alcohol free gas is because of snowmobilers.. Many of the pumps actually say recreational use, alcohol free, premium fuel.. Many sleds require premium fuel..

As far as running it in the KLR, I've been doing so for the 8 years that I've owned mine. Runs fine, starts fine, and no fuel related issues even when storing it.. I put SeaFoam in it and change oil in the fall, and in the spring I crank it over for a couple seconds and runs like it did when I put it away..

I can live with 10%.. Hasn't bothered any of my bikes, chainsaws, car, truck, 4 wheeler, etc....

Basically, I can think of a thousand other things that are more of a concern to me than 10% Ethanol in my gas..
 

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While not a proponent of the ethanol industry, I use it. The only station around here that sells straight gas is 30 miles away.

As noted by klr4evr, shelf life is a concern.

Which brings up a related question, since I run the ethanol blend in everything and we're talking shelf life.

Seems like all small engine manufacturers recommend you drain the fuel system for storage. I'm guessing they're probably right and I'm probably wrong, but I don't do it with my motorcycles, mowers or anything else.

At the end of the season, I fill the tanks, then add fairly copious amounts of Seafoam and let the engines run for awhile to make sure the Seafoam has circulated through the system.

Everything fires right up in the Spring. Again, I may be foolish, but it seems to me there are components in the fuel system, such as seals, o-rings, etc., that depend on the fuel for lubrication/preservation. It doesn't make any sense to dry them out for months at a time by draining everything.

Am I mistaken? Should I top off the KLR tank and add some Seafoam, shut off the tank and then drain the rest of the fuel system? We're talking a term of about 3-4 months here with a 10% ethanol blend and Seafoam in the system.
You do basically what I've been doing for years. The only difference is I've been using Sta-Bil but that may change.
I used the same system for storage when I owned 2 Honda CBX's. That's a total of 12 carbs. I never had any issues come spring with start up or carb gumming.
In the spring I usually syphon the gas out of the tank and add it to my car or truck. Figure it's better mixed in with some fresher stuff.

If you read your owners manual, for storage, Kawasaki will have you draining all fuel and removing the tank and swishing it with motor oil.
 

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Yeah, I just do it because I'm lazy. I've seen the other side of the coin, too.

I inherited some stuff with small gas engines from my Dad; two tillers, a snowblower, a generator, etc. He kept them in the basement, so he always drained all the gas out of them at the end of the season.

They had been sitting there, unused, for at least 15 years. Some of them were so old they required leaded gasoline. All were absolutely bone dry.

While maybe not as complex as a vehicle carburetor, every time I'd decide to pull one out and put some gas in it and see if it would run, I would proclaim, "This d**n thing's never gonna start."

Believe it or not, without exception, every one of them started within five or six pulls of the rope and ran like they were made yesterday.

I still wonder if the small gas engines produced today would do as well.
 

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Trend around here is for gas stn to offer both ethanol lended fuel AND pure gasoline. the pure stuff sells for 10 cents more per gallon. Based on the more favorable fuel economy alone, it makes sense to pay the extra dime, and opt for pure gas. My F-150 gets almost 10% better mpg on pure gasoline than it does on e-10.

CW
 
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