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Discussion Starter #1
My KLR came custom lowered by two inches. Is it hard to bring it back to stock height?

Can one person do it if the bike is on a jack/lift? Any special tools needed? Best to order stock parts from the dealer links and new kickstand, or some kind of after market parts?


Thanks


Crash
 

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I put raising links on mine. All you have to do is remove and reinstall two bolts/nuts. Personally, those bolts/nuts are something I made it a point to use a torque wrench on but you don't need any other special tools. I was actually just fiddling around with mine the other day. I'm pretty sure the nuts are 21mm and get about 72 ft./lbs. of torque.

It's best to get the rear wheel off the ground an inch or so so you can get some play in the suspension to finagle things around a little.

If you still have the stock kickstand, raising the rear of the bike should make it lean over even more on the stand for more stability. You'd probably just have to put your new links on and see what effect that has on the sidestand/lean angle.
 

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One other thing to check as well, the forks have more than likely been raised up in the triple clamps when the previous owner lowered it. Usually the tubes are raised up by about an inch or an inch and a half. It's a simple matter to loosen the 4 pinch bolts on the triple clamps (with the bike raised and supported of course) and then gently push on the tops of the tubes (assuming that it's a second gen KLR without the schrader valves) until the tubes are flush with the top of the triple clamps. The screw in cap portion at the top of the tubes should still be above the triples but the rest of the tube should be in the top of the triple. You'll also want to remove the front fender so that you can loosen the clamps and move the fork boots back to their original position, they slide up about an inch or so. Tighten everything back up and replace the fender and your golden :). Again, all this is on the Gen 2 machine, the Gen 1 would be about the same but there are schrader valves on top of the fork tubes.

Edit: Actually I screwed up, I think there are 8 pinch bolts you have to loosen, 2 at the top and bottom of each fork tube. When all of them are loose the forks slide pretty easily.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, it is a gen1 and the forks were modified when the lowering links went in. The bike rode and handled great last season, but I want to try more off road this season.


Crash
 

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One other thing to check as well, the forks have more than likely been raised up in the triple clamps when the previous owner lowered it. Usually the tubes are raised up by about an inch or an inch and a half. It's a simple matter to loosen the 4 pinch bolts on the triple clamps (with the bike raised and supported of course) and then gently push on the tops of the tubes (assuming that it's a second gen KLR without the schrader valves) until the tubes are flush with the top of the triple clamps. The screw in cap portion at the top of the tubes should still be above the triples but the rest of the tube should be in the top of the triple. You'll also want to remove the front fender so that you can loosen the clamps and move the fork boots back to their original position, they slide up about an inch or so. Tighten everything back up and replace the fender and your golden :). Again, all this is on the Gen 2 machine, the Gen 1 would be about the same but there are schrader valves on top of the fork tubes.
Good point. I'd overlooked that facet of the process since I didn't have to alter my setup in the front.
 

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I bought mine lowered as well, but luckily the original owner saved the links and such for me so I was able to restore it to original height. With a 32 inch inseam I'm pretty much on the balls of my feet but you get used to it pretty quick. My kickstand had been shortened about an inch but since the Gen 2's sit up so darn straight anyway (and fall over!) I left it shortened and it has the perfect lean when parked now :). I don't think the 1st gen machines stood up as straight though so you may have to replace your stand or have it lengthened by a welder.

I actually enjoyed being able to flat foot with the links, especially when backing up on loose gravel and uneven surfaces. I also drug the pegs a lot when turning when it was lowered though, didn't care for that too much! With it back up to stock height the pegs rarely drag unless the lean angle is severe... Much better! :35a:
 
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